Слова на букву be n-bull (459) Словарь американских идиом
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EN-DE-FR →  Словарь американских идиом →  --- -be m be n-bull bum -come come-does dog-fill fill-get get -hard hard-in a in a-keep keep-long long-nest nest-open open-pull pull-scen sche-so b so b-take take-turn turn-word


Слова на букву be n-bull (459)

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body English
{n.}, {informal} The wishful attempt to make a ball move in the right direction after it has been hit or let go, by twisting the body in the desired direction. * /He ...
bog down
{v. phr.} To be immobilized in mud, snow, etc.; slow down. * /Our research got bogged down for a lack of appropriate funding./ * /Don't get bogged down in too much ...
bog down, to get bogged down
{v. phr.}, {mostly intransitive or passive} 1. To stop progressing; to slow to a halt. * /Work on the new building bogged down, because the contractor didn't deliver the ...
boggle the mind
{v. phr.}, {informal} To stop the rational thinking process by virtue of being too fantastic or incredible. * /It boggles the mind that John should have been inside a ...
boil
See: MAKE ONE'S BLOOD BOIL or MAKE THE BLOOD BOIL.
boil down
{v.} 1. To boil away some of the water from; make less by boiling. * /She boiled down the maple sap to a thick syrup./ * /The fruit juice boiled down until it was almost not ...
boil over
{v. phr.} 1. To rise due to boiling and overflow down the sides of a pan or a pot. * /"Watch out!" Jane cried. "The milk is boiling over on the stove!"/ 2. To become ...
boiling point
{n.} 1. The temperature at which a liquid boils. * /The boiling point of water is 272{sup}o{/sup} Fahrenheit./ 2. The time when you become very angry. * /He has a low ...
bolt from the blue
{n. phr.} Something sudden and unexpected; an event that you did not see coming; a great and usually unpleasant surprise; shock. * /We had been sure she was in Chicago, ...
bombshell
See: EXPLODE A BOMBSHELL.
bond
See: SAVINGS BOND.
bone
See: BRED IN THE BONE, FEEL IN ONE'S BONES or KNOW IN ONE'S BONES, FUNNY BONE, MAKE NO BONES, SKIN AND BONES, T-BONE STEAK, WORK ONE'S FINGERS TO THE BONE.
bone of contention
{n. phr.} Something to fight over; a reason for quarrels; the subject of a fight. * /The boundary line between the farms was a bone of contention between the two farmers./ ...
bone to pick
or[crow to pick] {n. phr.}, {informal} A reason for dispute; something to complain of or argue about. - Often used jokingly. * /"I have a bone to pick with you," he ...
bone up
{v.}, {informal} To fill with information; try to learn a lot about something in a short time; study quickly. * /Carl was boning up for an examination./ * /Jim had to make a ...
bonehead
{n.}, {slang} An unusually dense or stupid person. * /John is such a bonehead - small wonder he flunks all of his courses./
bonest-to-goodness
or[honest-to-God] {adj. phr.}, {informal} Real; genuine. - Used for emphasis. * /She served him honest-to-goodness deep dish apple pie./ * /It was ...
bonnet
See: BEE IN ONE'S BONNET.
book
See: CLOSED BOOK, CLOSE THE BOOKS, HIT THE BOOKS, KEEP BOOKS, NOSE IN A BOOK, ONE FOR THE BOOKS, READ ONE LIKE A BOOK, TALKING BOOK, THROW THE BOOK AT.
boom
See: LOWER THE BOOM.
boot
See: DIE IN ONE'S BOOTS, IN ONE'S SHOES also IN ONE'S BOOTS, LICK ONE'S BOOTS, SHAKE IN ONE'S SHOES or SHAKE IN ONE'S BOOTS, TO BOOT, TOO BIG FOR ONE'S BREECHES or TOO BIG ...
boot hill
{n.} A cemetery in the old Wild West where cowboys and cops and robbers used to be buried with their boots on. Hence, jokingly, any cemetery. * /Good old Joe, the ...
boot out
See: KICK OUT.
boot strap
See: PULL ONESELF UP BY THE BOOTSTRAPS.
border on
{v. phr.} To be adjacent to; come close to; adjoin. * /Our village borders on the Mississippi River./ * /John's actions border on irresponsibility./
bore to death
See: TO DEATH.
bore to tears
{v. phr.} To fill with tired dislike; tire by dullness or the same old thing bore. * /The party was dull and Roger showed plainly that he was bored to tears./ * /Mary ...
born
See: NATURAL-BORN, TO THE MANNER BORN.
born out of wedlock
{adj. phr.} Born to parents who are not married to each other; without legal parents. * /Sometimes when a married couple can't have children, they adopt a child who ...
born with a silver spoon in one's mouth
{adj. phr.} Born to wealth and comfort; provided from birth with everything wanted; born rich. * /The stranger's conduct was that of a man who had been born with a ...
born yesterday
{adj. phr.} Inexperienced and easily fooled; not alert to trickery; easily deceived or cheated. - Usually used in negative sentences. * /When Bill started the new ...
borrow
See: LIVE ON BORROWED TIME.
borrow trouble
{v. phr.} To worry for nothing about trouble that may not come; make trouble for yourself needlessly. * /Don't borrow trouble by worrying about next year. It's too far ...
bosom friend
{n. phr.} A very close friend; an old buddy with whom one has a confidential relationship. * /Sue and Jane have been bosom friends since their college days./
boss
See: STRAW BOSS.
boss one around
{v. phr.} To keep giving someone orders; to act overbearingly toward someone. * /"If you keep bossing me around, darling," Tom said to Jane, "the days of our relationship ...
botch up
{v. phr.} To ruin, spoil, or mess something up. * /"I botched up my chemistry exam," Tim said, with a resigned sigh./
both
See: CUT BOTH WAYS, PLAGUE ON BOTH YOUR HOUSES.
both --- and
{coord. conj.} Used to emphasize that two or more things are talked about. * /Both Frank and Mary were at the party./ * /Millie is both a good swimmer and a good cook./ * ...
bothered
See: HOT AND BOTHERED.
bottle blond
{n.}, {slang} A person who is obviously not a natural blond but whose hair is artificially colored. * /I doubt that Leonora's hair color is natural; she strikes me ...
bottle up
{v.} 1. To hide or hold back; control. * /There was no understanding person to talk to, so Fred bottled up his unhappy feeling./ 2. To hold in a place from which there ...
bottleneck
{n.} A heavy traffic congestion. * /In Chicago the worst bottleneck is found where the Kennedy and the Eden's expressways separate on the way to the airport./
bottom
See: BET ONE'S BOOTS or BET ONE'S BOTTOM DOLLAR, FROM THE BOTTOM OF ONE'S HEART, FROM --- TO ---, GET TO THE BOTTOM OF, HIT BOTTOM or TOUCH BOTTOM, ROCK BOTTOM, SCRAPE ...
bottom dollar
{n.}, {v. phr.}, {informal} One's last penny, one's last dollar. * /He was down to his bottom dollar when he suddenly got the job offer./
bottom drop out
or[bottom fall out] {v. phr.} {informal} 1. To fall below an earlier lowest price. * /The bottom dropped out of the price of peaches./ 2. To lose all cheerful qualities; ...
bottom line
{n.}, {informal} (stress on " line") 1. The last word on a controversial issue; a final decision. * /"Give me the bottom line on the proposed merger," said John./ 2. The ...
bottom out
{v. phr.} To reach the lowest point (said chiefly of economic cycles). * /According to the leading economic indicators the recession will bottom out within the next two ...
bounce
See: GET THE BOUNCE, GIVE THE BOUNCE.
bound
See: BIND, BY LEAPS AND BOUNDS, OUT OF BOUNDS, WITHIN BOUNDS.
bound for
{adj. phr.} On the way to; going to. * /I am bound for the country club./ * /The ship is bound for Liverpool./
bound up with
{v. phr.} To be connected; be involved with. * /Tuition at our university is bound up with the state budget./
bow
See: TAKE A BOW.
bow and scrape
{v.} To be too polite or obedient from fear or hope of gain; act like a slave. * /The old servant bowed and scraped before them, too obedient and eager to please./
bow out
{v.}, {informal} 1. To give up taking part; excuse yourself from doing any more; quit. * /Mr. Black often quarreled with his partners, so finally he bowed out of the ...
bowl of cherries
See: BED OF ROSES.
bowl over
{v.}, {informal} 1. To knock down as if with a bowled ball. * /The taxi hit him a glancing blow and bowled him over./ 2. To astonish with success or shock with misfortune; ...
box
See: IN A BIND or IN A BOX, PENALTY BOX, PRESS BOX, STUFF THE BALLOT BOX, VOICE BOX.
box office
{n.}, {informal} 1. The place at movies and theaters where tickets may be purchased just before the performance instead of having ordered them through the telephone or having ...
boy
See: ALL WORK AND NO PLAY MAKES JACK A DULL BOY, FAIR-HAIRED BOY, MAMA'S BOY, OLD BOY, SEPARATE THE MEN FROM THE BOYS.
boyfriend
{n.}, {informal} 1. A male friend or companion. * /"John and his boyfriends have gone to the ball game," said his mother./ 2. A girl's steady date, a woman's ...
boys will be boys
Boys are only children and must sometimes get into mischief or trouble or behave too roughly. * /Boys will be boys and make a lot of noise, so John's mother told him and ...
brain
See: BEAT ONE'S BRAINS OUT, BLOW ONE'S BRAINS OUT, ON THE BRAIN, RACK ONE'S BRAIN, GET ONE'S BRAINS FRIED.
brain drain
{n.}, {informal} 1. The loss of the leading intellectuals and researchers of a country due to excessive emigration to other countries where conditions are better. * ...
brain bucket
{n.}, {slang} A motorcycle helmet. * /If you want to share a ride with me, you've got to wear a brain bucket./
brain trust
{n.} A group of specially trained, highly intelligent experts in a given field. * /Albert Einstein gathered a brain trust around himself at the Princeton Institute of ...
brain-storm
{v.} To have a discussion among fellow researchers or co-workers on a project in order to find the best solution to a given problem. * /Dr. Watson and his research assistants ...
brainstorm
{n.} A sudden insight; a stroke of comprehension. * /Listen to me, I've just had a major brainstorm, and I think I found the solution to our problem./
brake
See: RIDE THE BRAKE.
branch off
{v.} To go from something big or important to something smaller or less important; turn aside. * /At the bridge a little road branches off from the highway and ...
branch out
{v.} To add new interests or activities; begin doing other things also. * /First Jane collected stamps; then she branched out and collected coins, too./ * /John started a ...
brand-new
also[bran-new] {adj.} As new or fresh as when just made and sold by the manufacturer; showing no use or wear. * /He had taken a brand-new car from the dealer's floor and ...
brass
See: DOUBLE IN BRASS, GET DOWN TO BRASS TACKS.
brass hat
{n.}, {slang} 1. A high officer in the army, navy, or air force. * /The brass hats In Washington often discuss important secrets./ 2. Any person who has a high position ...
brass tacks
See: GET DOWN TO BRASS TACKS.
brave it out
{v. phr.} To endure something difficult or dangerous through to the end; keep on through trouble or danger. * /It was a dangerous ocean crossing in wartime, but captain and ...
brazen it out
{v. phr.} To pretend you did nothing wrong; be suspected, accused, or scolded without admitting you did wrong; act as if not guilty. * /The teacher found a stolen pen that ...
bread
See: HALF A LOAF is BETTER THAN NONE, KNOW WHICH SIDE ONE'S BREAD IS BUTTERED ON, TAKE THE BREAD OUT OF ONE'S MOUTH.
bread and butter(1)
{n. phr.} The usual needs of life; food, shelter, and clothing. * /Ed earned his bread and butter as a bookkeeper, but added a little jam by working with a ...
bread and butter(2)
{adj.} Thanking someone for entertainment or a nice visit; thank-you. * /After spending the weekend as a guest in the Jones' home, Alice wrote the Joneses the usual ...
bread and butter(3)
{interj.}, {informal} Spoken to prevent bad luck that you think might result from some action. * /We'd say " Bread and butter!" when we had passed on opposite sides of a ...
bread-and-butter letter
{n.} A written acknowledgment of hospitality received. * /Jane wrote the Browns a bread-and-butter letter when she returned home from her visit to them./
breadbasket
{n}, {slang} The stomach. * /John is stuffing his breadbasket again./
break
See: COFFEE BREAK.
break off
{v.} 1. To stop suddenly. * /The speaker was interrupted so often that he broke off and sat down./ * /When Bob came in, Jean broke off her talk with Linda and ...
break away
or[break loose] {v. phr.} To liberate oneself from someone or something. * /Jane tried to break loose from her attacker, but he was too strong./
break camp
{v. phr.} To take down and pack tents and camping things; take your things from a camping place. * /The scouts broke camp at dawn./
break down
{v.} (stress on "down") 1. To smash or hit (something) so that it falls; cause to fall by force. * /The firemen broke down the door./ 2. To reduce or destroy the strength ...
break even
{v. phr.}, {informal} (stress on "even") To end a series of gains and losses having the same amount you started with; have expenses equal to profits; have equal gain ...
break ground
{v. phr.} To begin a construction project by digging for the foundation; especially, to turn the formal first spadeful of dirt. * /City officials and industrial leaders were ...
break in
{v.} (stress on "in") 1a. To break from outside. * /The firemen broke in the door of the burning house./ 1b. To enter by force or unlawfully. * /Thieves broke in while the ...
break into
{v.} 1. To force an entrance into; make a rough or unlawful entrance into. * /Thieves broke into the store at night./ 2. {informal} To succeed in beginning (a career, ...
break new ground
{v. phr.} 1. To start a new activity previously neglected by others; do pioneering work. * /Albert Einstein broke new ground with his theory of relativity./ 2. To begin ...
break one's balls
{v. phr.}, {slang}, {vulgar}, {avoidable} To do something with maximum effort; to do something very difficult or taxing * /I've been breaking my balls to buy you this new ...
break one's heart
{v. phr.} To discourage greatly; make very sad or hopeless. * /His son's disgrace broke his heart./ * /When Mr. White lost everything he had worked so hard for, it broke his ...
break one's neck
{v. phr.}, {slang} To do all you possibly can; try your hardest. - Usually used with a limiting adverb or negative. * /John nearly broke his neck trying not to be late to ...
break one's word
{v. phr.} To renege on a promise. * /When Jake broke his word that he would marry Sarah, she became very depressed./
break out
{v.} 1. To begin showing a rash or other skin disorder. - Often used with "with". * /He broke out with scarlet fever./ 2. To speak or act suddenly and violently. * /He ...
break the ice
{v. phr.}, {informal} 1. To conquer the first difficulties in starting a conversation, getting a party going, or making an acquaintance. * /To break the ice Ted spoke ...
break the record
{v. phr.} To set or to establish a new mark or record. * /Algernon broke the record in both the pentathlon and the decathlon and took home two gold medals from the ...
break through
{v.} To be successful after overcoming a difficulty or bar to success. * /Dr. Salk failed many times but he finally broke through to find a successful polio vaccine./ * /Jim ...
break up
{v. phr.} To end a romantic relationship, a marriage, or a business partnership. * /Tom and Jane broke up because Tom played so much golf that he had no time for her./
break with
{v.} To separate yourself from; end membership in; stop friendly association with. * /He broke with the Democratic party on the question of civil rights./ * /He had ...
break-even
{n.} The point of equilibrium in a business venture when one has made as much money as one had invested, but not more - that would be "profit." * /"We've reached the ...
break-in
{n.} (stress on " break") A robbery; a burglary. * /We lost our jewelry during a break-in./
break-up
{n.} The end of a relationship, personal or commercial. * /The break-up finally occurred when Smith and Brown decided to sue each other for embezzlement./
breakdown
See: NERVOUS BREAKDOWN.
breaker
See: JAW-BREAKER.
breakthrough
{n.} A point of sudden success after a long process of experimentation, trial and error. * /The U.S. Space Program experienced a major breakthrough when Armstrong and ...
breast
See: MAKE A CLEAN BREAST OF.
breath
See: CATCH ONE'S BREATH, DRAW A LONG BREATH or TAKE A LONG BREATH, HOLD ONE'S BREATH, IN THE SAME BREATH, OUT OF BREATH, SAVE ONE'S BREATH, SECOND WIND also SECOND ...
breathe down one's neck
{v. phr.}, {informal} To follow closely; threaten from behind; watch every action. * /Too many creditors were breathing down his neck./ * /The carpenter didn't like to work ...
breathe easily
or[breathe freely] {v.} To have relief from difficulty or worry; relax; feel that trouble is gone; stop worrying. * /Now that the big bills were paid, he breathed more ...
breathe one's last
{v. phr.} To die. * /The wounded soldier fell back on the ground and breathed his last./
bred in the bone
{adj. phr.} Belonging to your nature or character, especially from early teaching or long habit; natural from belief or habit; believing deeply. * /The Willett ...
breeches
See: TOO BIG FOR ONE'S BREECHES.
breeze
See: SHOOT THE BREEZE or BAT THE BREEZE or FAN THE BREEZE, WIN IN A WALK or WIN IN A BREEZE.
breeze in
{v. phr.}, {slang}, {informal} To walk into a place casually (like a soft blowing wind). * /Betsie breezed in and sat down at the bar./
brew
See: HOME BREW.
brick
See: MAKE BRICKS WITHOUT STRAW.
brick wall
See: STONE WALL.
bridge
See: BURN ONE'S BRIDGES, CROSS A BRIDGE BEFORE ONE COMES TO IT, WATER OVER THE DAM or WATER UNDER THE BRIDGE.
brief
See: HOLD A BRIEF FOR, IN BRIEF or IN SHORT or IN A WORD.
bright and early
{adj. phr.} Prompt and alert; on time and ready; cheerful and on time or before time. * /He came down bright and early to breakfast./ * /She arrived bright and early for the ...
bring
or[wheel in] or[out] or[up the big guns] {v. phr.} To make use of a concealed plan in order to defeat an opponent in an argument or in a game, debate, or competition. * ...
bring down
{v. phr.}, {slang}, {informal} 1. To deflate (someone's ego). * /John brought Ted down very cleverly with his remarks./ 2. To depress (someone). * /The funeral ...
bring about
{v.} To cause; produce; lead to. * /The war had brought about great changes in living./ * /Drink brought about his downfall./
bring around
or[bring round] {v.} 1. {informal} To restore to health or consciousness cure. * /He was quite ill, but good nursing brought him around./ Compare: BRING TO(1). 2. To ...
bring down about one's ears
or[bring down around one's ears] See: ABOUT ONE'S EARS.
bring down the house
{v. phr.}, {informal} To start an audience laughing or clapping enthusiastically. * /The principal's story was funny in itself and also touched their loyalties, so it ...
bring home
{v.} To show clearly; emphasize; make (someone) realize; demonstrate. * /The accident caused a death in his family, and it brought home to him the evil of drinking ...
bring home the bacon
{v. phr.}, {informal} 1. To support your family; earn the family living. * /He was a steady fellow, who always brought home the bacon./ 2. To win a game or prize. * ...
bring in
{v.} In baseball: To enable men on base to score, score. * /Dick's hit brought in both base runners./ * /A walk and a triple brought in a run in the third inning./
bring into line
{v. phr.} To make someone conform to the accepted standard. * /Sam had to be brought into line when he refused to take his muddy shoes off the cocktail table./
bring off
{v.} To do (something difficult); perform successfully (an act of skill); accomplish (something requiring unusual ability). * /By skillful discussion, Mr. White had brought off ...
bring on
{v.} To result in; cause; produce. * /The murder of Archduke Franz Ferdinand in the summer of 1914 brought on the First World War./ * /Spinal meningitis brought on John's ...
bring out
{v.} 1. To cause to appear; make clear. * /His report brought out the foolishness of the plan./ * /Brushing will bring out the beauty of your hair./ 2. To help (an ability ...
bring round
See: BRING AROUND.
bring suit against
{v. phr.} To sue someone in a court of law. * /Fred brought suit against Tom for fraud and embezzlement./
bring to
{v.} (stress on "to") 1. To restore to consciousness; wake from sleep, anesthesia, hypnosis, or fainting. * /Smelling salts will often bring a fainting person to./ Compare: ...
bring to a close
{v. phr.} To terminate; cause to end. * /The meeting was brought to an abrupt close when the speaker collapsed with a heart attack./
bring to a head
{v. phr.} To cause some activity to reach the point of culmination. * /Time is running out, gentlemen, so let us bring this discussion to a head./
bring to bay
{v. phr.} To chase or force into a place where escape is impossible without a fight; trap; corner. * /The police brought the robber to bay on the roof and he gave ...
bring to heel
See: TO HEEL.
bring to light
{v. phr.} To discover (something hidden); find out about; expose. * /Many things left by the ancient Egyptians in tombs have been brought to light by scientists and ...
bring to one's knees
{v. phr.} To seriously weaken the power or impair the function of. * /The fuel shortage brought the automobile industry to its knees./
bring to pass
{v. phr.}, {informal} To make (something) happen; succeed in causing. * /By much planning, the mother brought the marriage to pass./ * /The change in the law was ...
bring to terms
{v. phr.} To make (someone) agree or do; make surrender. * /The two brothers were brought to terms by their father for riding the bicycle./ * /The war won't end until we ...
bring up
{v.} 1. To take care of (a child); raise, train, educate. * /He gave much attention and thought to bringing up his children./ * /Joe was born in Texas but brought ...
bring up the rear
{v. phr.} 1. To come last in a march, parade, or procession; end a line. * /The fire truck with Santa on it brought up the rear of the Christmas parade./ * /The governor ...
bringdown
{n.}, {slang}, {informal} 1. (from " bring down", past "brought down"). A critical or cutting remark said sarcastically in order to deflate a braggard's ego. * /John always ...
broke
See: GO BROKE, GO FOR BROKE, STONE-BROKE OT DEAD BROKE or FLAT BROKE, STRAW THAT BROKE THE CAMEL'S BACK.
Bronx cheer
{n. phr.}, {slang} A loud sound made with tongue and lips to show opposition or scorn. * /When he began to show anti-union feelings, he was greeted with Bronx cheers all ...
broom
See: NEW BROOM SWEEPS CLEAN.
broth
See: SCOTCH BROTH.
brow
See: BY THE SWEAT OF ONE'S BROW.
brown
See: DO UP BROWN.
brown paper bag
{n.}, {slang}, {citizen's band radio jargon} An unmarked police car. * /The beaver got a Christmas card because she didn't notice the brown paper bag at her back ...
brown study
{n. phr.} A time of deep thought about something; a deep thoughtful mood. * /When his wife found him, he had pushed away his books and was in a brown study./
brown-bagger
{n.}, {slang}, {informal} A person who does not go to the cafeteria or to a restaurant for lunch at work, but who brings his homemade lunch to work in order to save money. * ...
brown-nose
{v.}, {slang}, {avoidable}, {though gaining in acceptance} To curry favor in a subservient way, as by obviously exaggerated flattery. * /Max brown-noses his ...
brush
See: BEAT THE BUSHES or BEAT THE BRUSH.
brush aside
{v. phr.} To ignore; give no reply. * /Brushing aside the editor's comments, the young novelist proceeded with his story, which was subsequently rejected by the publisher./
brush back
{v.} To throw a baseball pitch close to. * /The pitcher threw a high inside pitch to brush the batter back./ Syn.: DUST OFF.
brush off
or[give the brush off] {v. phr.} 1. To refuse to hear or believe; quickly and impatiently; not take seriously or think important. * /John brushed off Bill's warning that ...
brush up
or[brush up on] {v.} To refresh one's memory of or skill at by practice or review; improve; make perfect. * /She spent the summer brushing up on her American History as ...
brushoff
See: GET THE BRUSHOFF, BRUSH OFF or GIVE THE BRUSHOFF.
bubble gum music
{n.}, {slang} The kind of rock'n'roll that appeals to young teenagers. * /When will you learn to appreciate Mozart instead of that bubble gum music?/
bubble trouble
{n.}, {slang}, {citizen's band radio jargon} Tire trouble, flat tire. * /The eighteen wheeler ahead of me seems to have bubble trouble./
buck
See: FAST BUCK or QUICK BUCK, PASS THE BUCK.
buck passer
,[buck-passing] See: PASS THE BUCK.
buck up
{v. phr.}, {informal} To make or become more cheerful; make or become free from discouragement; become more hopeful. * /After the heavy rain, the scoutmaster bucked up the ...
bucket
See: KICK THE BUCKET, RAIN CATS AND DOGS or RAIN BUCKETS.
bucket of bolts
{n.}, {slang} A very old and shaky car that barely goes. * /When are you going to get rid of that old bucket of bolts?/
buckle
See: BUCKLE DOWN or KNUCKLE DOWN.
buckle down
or[knuckle down] {v.} To give complete attention (to an effort or job); attend. * /They chatted idly for a few moments then each buckled down to work./ * /Jim was fooling ...
bud
See: NIP IN THE BUD.
bug in one's ear
{n. phr.}, {informal} A hint; secret information given to someone to make him act; idea. * /I saw Mary at the jeweler's admiring the diamond pin; I'll put a bug in Henry's ...
bug-eyed
{adj.}, {slang} Wide-eyed with surprise. * /He stood there bug-eyed when told that he had won the award./
buggy-whip
{n.}, {slang} An unusually long, thin radio antenna on a car that bends back like a whip when the car moves fast. * /He's very impressed with himself ever since he got a ...
bughouse(1)
{n.}, {slang} An insane asylum. * /They took Joe to the bughouse./
bughouse(2)
{adj.}, {slang} Crazy, insane. * /Joe's gone bughouse./
build
See: JERRY-BUILT.
build a fire under
{v. phr.} To urge or force (a slow or unwilling person) to action; get (someone) moving; arouse. * /The health department built a fire under the restaurant owner ...
build castles in the air
or[build castles in Spain] {v. phr.} To make impossible or imaginary plans, dream about future successes that are unlikely. * /He liked to build castles in the air, but ...
build on sand
{v. phr.} To lay a weak or insufficient foundation for a building, a business, or a relationship. * /"I don't want to build my business on sand," John said, "so please. ...
build up
{v.} 1. To make out of separate pieces or layers; construct from parts. * /Johnny built up a fort out of large balls of snow./ * /Lois built up a cake of three layers./ ...
build up to
{v. phr.} To be in the process of reaching a culmination point. * /The clouds were building up to a violent storm./ * /Their heated words were building up to a ...
bull
See: HIT THE BULLS-EYE, SHOOT THE BREEZE or SHOOT THE BULL, TAKE THE BULL BY THE HORNS.
bull in a china shop
{n. phr.} A rough or clumsy person who says or does something to anger others or upset plans; a tactless person. * /We were talking politely and carefully with the teacher about ...
bull session
{n.}, {slang} A long informal talk about something by a group of persons. * /After the game the boys in the dormitory had a bull session until the lights went out./
bullet lane
{n.}, {slang}, {citizen's band radio jargon} The passing lane. * /Move over into the bullet lane, this eighteen wheeler is moving too slow./
bullshit
{n.}, {vulgar, but gaining in acceptance by some} Exaggerated or insincere talk meant to impress others. * /"Joe, this is a lot of bullshit!"/
bullshit artist
{n.}, {slang}, {vulgar, but gaining in social acceptance} A person who habitually makes exaggerated or insincerely flattering speeches designed to impress others. * /Joe is ...

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