Слова на букву bum -come (459) Словарь американских идиом
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EN-DE-FR →  Словарь американских идиом →  --- -be m be n-bull bum -come come-does dog-fill fill-get get -hard hard-in a in a-keep keep-long long-nest nest-open open-pull pull-scen sche-so b so b-take take-turn turn-word


Слова на букву bum -come (459)

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bum around
{v. phr.}, {slang} To aimlessly wander in no definite direction, like a vagabond. * /Jim had been bumming around in the desert for three days and nights before he was able ...
bum steer
{n.} Wrong or misleading directions given naively or on purpose. * /Man, you sure gave me a bum steer when you told me to go north on the highway; you should have sent me ...
bum to a crisp
{v. phr.} To burn black; burn past saving or using especially as food. * /While getting breakfast, Mother was called to the telephone, and when she got back, the bacon had ...
bum's rush
{n. phr.}, {slang} Throwing or pushing someone out from where he is not wanted. * /When John tried to go to the party where he was not invited, Bill and Fred gave him the ...
bump
See: GOOSE BUMPS.
bump into
{v.}, {informal} To meet without expecting to; happen to meet; come upon by accident. * /Mary was walking down the street, when she suddenly bumped into Joan./ * /Ed was ...
bump off
{v.}, {slang} To kill in a violent way; murder in gangster fashion. * /Hoodlums in a speeding car bumped him off with Tommy guns./
bundle of laughs
{n. phr.} A very amusing person, thing, or event. * /Uncle Lester tells so many jokes that he is a bundle of laughs./
bundle up
See: WRAP UP(1).
burn
See: EARS BURN, KEEP THE HOME FIRES BURNING, MONEY TO BURN.
burn a hole in one's pocket
{v. phr.} To make you want to buy something; be likely to be quickly spent. * /Money burns a hole in Linda's pocket./ * /The silver dollar that Don got for his ...
burn down
{v. phr.} To burn to the ground; be totally gutted by fire. * /The old frame house burned down before the firefighters could get to it./
burn in effigy
See: HANG IN EFFIGY.
burn one's bridges
also[burn one's boats] {v. phr.} To make a decision that you cannot change; remove or destroy all the ways you can get back out of a place you have got into on ...
burn one's fingers
{v. phr.}, {informal} To get in trouble doing something and fear to do it again; learn caution through an unpleasant experience. * /He had burned his fingers in the stock ...
burn out
{v. phr.} 1. To destroy by fire or by overheating. * /Mr. Jones burned out the clutch on his car./ 2. To destroy someone's house or business by fire so that they have ...
burn rubber
{v. phr.}, {slang} 1. To start up a car or a motorcycle from dead stop so fast that the tires leave a mark on the road. * /The neighborhood drag racers burned a ...
burn the candle at both ends
{v. phr.} To work or play too hard without enough rest; get too tired. * /He worked hard every day as a lawyer and went to parties and dances every night; he was burning ...
burn the midnight oil
{v. phr.} To study late at night. * /Exam time was near, and more and more pupils were burning the midnight oil./
burn up
{v.} 1. To burn completely; destroy or be destroyed by fire. * /Mr. Scott was burning up old letters./ * /The house burned up before the firemen got there./ 2. {informal} ...
burn up the road
{v. phr.}, {informal} To drive a car very fast. * /In his eagerness to see his girl again, he burned up the road on his way to see her./ * /Speed demons burning up the ...
burn-out
{n.} A point of physical or emotional exhaustion. * /There are so many refugees all over the world that charitable organizations as well as individuals are ...
burnt child dreads the fire
or[once bitten, twice shy] A person who has suffered from doing something has learned to avoid doing it again. - A proverb. * /Once Mary had got lost when her mother took ...
burst at the seams
{v. phr.}, {informal} To be too full or too crowded. * /John ate so much he was bursting at the seams./ * /Mary's album was so full of pictures it was bursting at the ...
burst into
{v. phr.} 1. To enter suddenly. * /Stuart burst into the room, screaming angrily./ 2. To break out. * /The crowd burst out cheering when the astronauts paraded along Fifth ...
burst into flames
{v. phr.} To begin to burn suddenly. * /The children threw away some burning matches and the barn burst into flames./
burst into tears
{v. phr.} To suddenly start crying. * /Mary burst into tears when she heard that her brother was killed in a car accident./
burst with joy
or[pride] {v. phr.} To be so full of the feeling of joy or pride that one cannot refrain from showing one's exuberant feelings. * /Armstrong and Aldrin burst with pride when ...
bury one's head in the sand
See: HIDE ONE'S HEAD IN THE SAND.
bury the hatchet
{v. phr.}, {informal} To settle a quarrel or end a war; make peace. * /The two men had been enemies a long time, but after the flood they buried the hatchet./ Compare: MAKE ...
bus
See: MISS THE BOAT or MISS THE BUS.
bush
See: BEAT ABOUT THE BUSH, BIRD IN THE HAND IS WORTH TWO IN THE BUSH.
bushel
See: HIDE ONE'S LIGHT UNDER A BUSHEL.
bushes
See: BEAT THE BUSHES.
business
See: DO THE BUSINESS, HAVE NO BUSINESS, LAND-OFFICE BUSINESS, MEAN BUSINESS, MONKEY BUSINESS, THE BUSINESS.
bust up
{v. phr.}, {slang} To terminate a partnership, a relationship, a friendship, or a marriage. * /If Jack keeps drinking the way he does, it will bust up his marriage to ...
busy work
{n.} Work that is done not to do or finish anything important, but just to keep busy. * /When the teacher finished all she had to say it was still a half hour before ...
but good
{adv. phr.}, {informal} Very much so; thoroughly completely; forcefully. - Used for emphasis. * /Jack called Charles a bad name, and Charles hit him, but good./ * /Tom ...
but for
See: EXCEPT FOR.
but not least
See: LAST BUT NOT LEAST.
butt in
{v.}, {slang} To join in with what other people are doing without asking or being asked; interfere in other people's business; meddle. * /Mary was explaining to Jane how to ...
butter
See: BREAD AND BUTTER.
butter up
{v.}, {informal} To try to get the favor or friendship of (a person) by flattery or pleasantness. * /He began to butter up the boss in hope of being given a better ...
butter wouldn't melt in one's mouth
{informal} You act very polite and friendly but do not really care, you are very nice to people but are not sincere. * /The new secretary was rude to the other workers, ...
butterflies in one's stomach
{n. phr.} A queer feeling in the stomach caused by nervous fear or uncertainty; a feeling of fear or anxiety in the stomach. * /When Bob walked into the factory office ...
button
See: HAVE ALL ONE'S BUTTONS, ON THE BUTTON, PUSH THE PANIC BUTTON.
button down
{v.}, {slang} (stress on "down") To state precisely, to ascertain, to pin down, to peg down. * /First let's get the facts buttoned down, then we can plan ahead./
button one's lip
also[zip one's lip] {v. phr.}, {slang} To stop talking; keep a secret; shut your mouth; be quiet. * /The man was getting loud and insulting and the cop told him to ...
button-down
{attrib. adj.}, {slang} (stress on " button") Well-groomed, conservatively dressed. * /Joe is a regular button-down type./
buttonhole
{v.} To approach a person in order to speak with him or her in private. * /After waiting for several hours, Sam managed to buttonhole his boss just as she was about to ...
buy for a song
{v. phr.} To buy something very cheaply. * /Since the building on the corner was old and neglected, I was able to buy it for a song./
buy off
{v.} To turn from duty or purpose by a gift. * /When the police threatened to stop the gambling business, the owner bought them off./ * /The Indians were going to burn the ...
buy out
{v.} 1. To buy the ownership or a share of; purchase the stock of. * /He bought out several small stockholders. 2. To buy all the goods of; purchase the merchandise of./ * ...
buy up
{v. phr.} To purchase the entire stock of something. * /The company is trying to buy up all the available shares./
buzz
See: GIVE A RING also GIVE A BUZZ.
buzz word
{n.} A word that sounds big and important in a sentence but, on closer inspection, means little except the speaker's indication to belong to a certain group. * /The ...
by
See: TOO --- BY HALF.
by a hair
See: HANG BY A THREAD or HANG BY A HAIR
by a long shot
{adv. phr.}, {informal} By a big difference; by far. - Used to add emphasis. * /Bert was the best swimmer in the race, by a long shot./ Often used with a negative. * /Tom ...
by a mile
See: MISS BY A MILE.
by a thread
See: HANG BY A THREAD.
by all means
also[by all manner of means] {adv. phr.} Certainly, without fail. * /He felt that he should by all means warn Jones./ Contrast: BY NO MEANS.
by all odds
{adv. phr.} Without question; certainly. * /He was by all odds the strongest candidate./ * /By all odds we should win the game, because the other team is so weak./ Compare: ...
by and by
{adv.} After a while; at some time in the future; later. * /Roger said he would do his homework by and by./ * /The mother knew her baby would be a man by and by and ...
by and large
{adv. phr.} As it most often happens; more often than not; usually; mostly. * /There were bad days, but it was a pleasant summer, by and large./ * /By and large, ...
by any means
See: BY NO MEANS.
by chance
{adv. phr.} Without any cause or reason; by accident; accidentally. * /Tom met Bill by chance./ * /The apple fell by chance on Bobby's head./
by choice
{adv. phr.} As a result of choosing because of wanting to; freely. * /John helped his father by choice./ * /Mary ate a plum, but not by choice. Her mother told her she must ...
by dint of
{prep.} By the exertion of; by the use of; through. * /By dint of sheer toughness and real courage, he lived through the jungle difficulties and dangers./ * /His ...
by ear
{adv. phr.} 1. By sound, without ever reading the printed music of the piece being played. * /The church choir sang the hymns by ear./ 2. Waiting to see what will happen. * ...
by far
{adv. phr.} By a large difference; much. * /His work was better by far than that of any other printer in the city./ * /The old road is prettier, but it is by far the ...
by fits and starts
or[jerks] {adv. phr.} With many stops and starts, a little now and a little more later; not all the time; irregularly. * /He had worked on the invention by fits and ...
by heart
{adv. phr.} By exact memorizing; so well that you remember it; by memory. * /The pupils learned many poems by heart./ * /He knew the records of the major league teams by ...
by hook or by crook
{adv. phr.} By honest ways or dishonest in any way necessary. * /The wolf tried to get the little pigs by hook or by crook./ * /The team was determined to win that last game ...
by inches
{adv. phr.} By small or slow degrees; little by little; gradually. * /The river was rising by inches./ * /They got a heavy wooden beam under the barn for a lever, and ...
by leaps and bounds
{adv. phr.} With long steps; very rapidly. * /Production in the factory was increasing by leaps and bounds./ * /The school enrollment was going up by leaps and bounds./
by means of
{prep.} By the use of; with the help of. * /The fisherman saved himself by means of a floating log./ * /By means of monthly payments, people can buy more than in the ...
by mistake
{adv. phr.} As the result of a mistake; through error. * /He picked up the wrong hat by mistake./
by no means
or[not by any means] also[by no manner of means] or [not by any manner of means] {adv. phr.} Not even a little; certainly not. * /He is by no means bright./ * /"May I stay ...
by one's own bootstraps
See: PULL ONE SELF UP BY THE BOOTSTRAPS.
by oneself
{adv. phr.} 1. Without any others around; separate from others; alone. * /The house stood by itself on a hill./ * /Tom liked to go walking by himself./ * /Betty felt ...
by storm
See: TAKE BY STORM.
by surprise
See: TAKE BY SURPRISE.
by the board
See: GO BY THE BOARD also PASS BY THE BOARD.
by the bootstraps
See: PULL ONESELF UP BY THE BOOTSTRAPS.
by the bye
See: BY THE WAY.
by the dozen
or[by the hundred] or[by the thousand] {adv. phr.} Very many at one time; in great numbers. * /Tommy ate cookies by the down./ Often used in the plural, meaning even larger ...
by the horns
See: TAKE THE BULL BY THE HORNS.
by the hundred
See: BY THE DOZEN.
by the nose
See: LEAD BY THE NOSE.
by the piece
{adv. phr.} Counted one piece at a time, separately for each single piece. * /John bought boxes full of bags of potato chips and sold them by the piece./ * /Mary ...
by the seat of one's pants
See: FLY BY THE SEAT OF ONE'S PANTS.
by the skin of one's teeth
{adv. phr.} By a narrow margin; with no room to spare; barely. * /The drowning man struggled, and I got him to land by the skin of my teeth./ * /She passed English by the ...
by the sweat of one's brow
{adv. phr.} By hard work; by tiring effort; laboriously. * /Even with modern labor-saving machinery, the farmer makes his living by the sweat of his brow./
by the thousand
See: BY THE DOZEN.
by the way
also[by the bye] {adv. phr.} Just as some added fact or news; as something else that I think of. - Used to introduce something related to the general subject, or ...
by the wayside
See: FALL BY THE WAYSIDE.
by turns
{adv. phr.} First one and then another in a regular way; one substituting for or following another according to a repeated plan. * /On the drive to Chicago, the three men ...
by virtue of
also[in virtue of] {prep.} On the strength of; because of; by reason of. * /By virtue of his high rank and position, the President takes social leadership over almost ...
by way of
{prep.} 1. For the sake or purpose of; as. * /By way of example, he described his own experience./ 2. Through; by a route including; via. * /He went from New York to San ...
by word of mouth
{adv. phr.} From person to person by the spoken word; orally. * /The news got around by word of mouth./ * /The message reached him quietly by word of mouth./
bye
See: BY THE WAY also BY THE BYE.
bygone
See: LET BYGONES BE BYGONES.
C.E.O.
{n.} Abbreviation of "Chief Executive Officer." The head of a company, factory, firm, etc. * /We are very proud of the fact that our C.E.O. is a young woman./
C.O.D.
{n. phr.} Abbreviation of " cash on delivery." * /If you want to receive a piece of merchandise by mail and pay when you receive it, you place a C.O.D. order./
cahoots
See: IN LEAGUE WITH or IN CAHOOTS WITH.
Cain
See: RAISE CAIN.
cake
See: EAT-ONE'S CAKE AND HAVE IT TOO, PAT-A-CAKE, TAKE THE CAKE.
calculated risk
{n.} An action that may fail but is judged more likely to succeed. * /The sending of troops to the rebellious island was a calculated risk./
calf love
See: PUPPY LOVE.
call
See: AT CALL, AT ONE'S BECK AND CALL, CLOSE CALL, ON CALL, PORT OF CALL, POT CALLS THE KETTLE BLACK, WITHIN CALL.
call girl
{n.}, {slang} A prostitute catering to wealthy clientele, especially one who is contacted by telephone for an appointment. * /Rush Street is full of call girls./
call a halt
{v. phr.} To give a command to stop. * /The scouts were tired during the hike, and the scoutmaster called a halt./ * /When the children's play, got too noisy, their ...
call a spade a spade
{v. phr.} To call a person or thing a name that is true but not polite; speak bluntly; use the plainest language. * /A boy took some money from Dick's desk and said he ...
call down
also[dress down] {v.}, {informal} To scold. * /Jim was called down by his teacher for being late to class./ * /Mother called Bob down for walking into the kitchen with muddy ...
call for
{v.} 1. To come or go to get (someone or something). * /John called for Mary to take her to the dance./ Syn.: PICK UP. 2. To need; require. * /The cake recipe calls for ...
call in question
or[call into question] or[call in doubt] {v. phr.} To say (something) may be a mistake; express doubt about; question. * /Bill called in question Ed's remark that ...
call it a day
{v. phr.} To declare that a given day's work has been accomplished and go home; to quit for the day. * /"Let's call it a day," the boss said, "and go out for a drink."/ * ...
call it a night
{v. phr.} To declare that an evening party or other activity conducted late in the day is finished. * /I am so tired that I am going to call it a night and go to ...
call it quits
{v. phr.}, {informal} 1. To decide to stop what you are doing; quit. * /When Tom had painted half the garage, he called it quits./ 2. To agree that each side in a fight is ...
call names
{v. phr.} To use ugly or unkind words when speaking to someone or when talking about someone. - Usually used by or to children. * /Bill got so mad he started calling ...
call off
{v.} To stop (something planned); quit; cancel. * /When the ice became soft and sloppy, we had to call off the ice-skating party./ * /The baseball game was called off ...
call on
or[call upon] {v.} 1. To make a call upon; visit. * /Mr. Brown called on an old friend while he was in the city./ 2. To ask for help. * /He called on a friend to give him ...
call on the carpet
{v. phr.}, {informal} To call (a person) before an authority (as a boss or teacher) for a scolding or reprimand. * /The worker was called on the carpet by the ...
call one's bluff
{v. phr.}, {informal} To ask someone to prove what he says he can or will do. (Originally from the card game of poker.) * /Tom said he could jump twenty feet and so ...
call one's shot
{v. phr.} 1. To tell before firing where a bullet will hit. * /An expert rifleman can call his shot regularly./ * /The wind was strong and John couldn't call his shots./ 2. ...
call out
{v. phr.} 1. To shout; speak loudly. * /My name was called out several times, but I was unable to hear it./ 2. To summon someone. * /If the rioting continues, the ...
call the roll
{v. phr.} To read out the names on a certain list, usually in alphabetical order. * /The sergeant called the roll of the newly enlisted volunteers in the army./
call the shots
{v. phr.}, {informal} To give orders; be in charge; direct; control. * /Bob is a first-rate leader who knows how to call the shots./ * /The quarterback called the ...
call the tune
{v. phr.}, {informal} To be in control; give orders or directions; command. * /Bill was president of the club but Jim was secretary and called the tune./ * /The people supported ...
call the turn
See: CALL ONE'S SHOT(2).
call to account
{v. phr.} 1. To ask (someone) to explain why he did something wrong (as breaking a rule). * /The principal called Jim to account after Jim left school early without ...
call to arms
{v. phr.} To summon into the army. * /During World War II millions of Americans were called to arms to fight for their country./
call to mind
{v. phr.} To remember; cause to remember. * /Your story calls to mind a similar event that happened to us a few years back./
call to order
{v. phr.} 1. To open (a meeting) formally. * /The chairman called the committee to order./ * /The president pounded with his gavel to call the convention to order./ 2. To ...
call up
{v.} 1. To make someone think of; bring to mind; remind. * /The picture of the Capitol called up memories of our class trip./ 2. To tell to come (as before a court). * ...
call upon
See: CALL ON.
calling down
also[dressing down] {n. phr.}, {informal} A scolding; reprimand. * /The judge gave the boy a calling down for speeding./
calm down
{v. phr.} To become quiet; relax. * /"Calm down, Mr. Smith," the doctor said with a reassuring smile. "You are going to live a long time."/
came natural
See: COME EASY.
camel
See: STRAW THAT BROKE THE CAMEL'S BACK at LAST STRAW.
camp
See: BREAK CAMP.
camp follower
{n.} 1. A man or woman who goes with an army, not to fight but to sell something. * /Nowadays camp followers are not allowed as they were long ago./ 2. A person who goes ...
camp out
{v.} To live, cook, and sleep out of doors (as in a tent). * /We camped out near the river for a week./
campaign
See: WHISPERING CAMPAIGN.
can
See: AS BEST ONE CAN, CATCH AS CATCH CAN.
can of worms
{n.}, {slang}, {informal} 1. A complex problem, or complicated situation. * /Let's not get into big city politics - that's a different can of worms./ 2. A very restless, ...
can't help but
{informal} also {formal}[cannot but] {v. phr.} To be forced to; can only; must. * /When the streets are full of melting snow, you can't help but get your shoes wet./ * /When ...
can't make an omelette without breaking (some) eggs
To achieve a certain goal one must sometimes incur damage, experience difficulties, or make sacrifices. - A proverb. * /When we drove across the country, we put a lot of ...
can't see the wood for the trees
or[can't see the woods for the trees] or[can't see the forest for the trees] {v. phr.} To be unable to judge or understand the whole because of attention to the parts; ...
canary
See: LOOK LIKE THE CAT THAT ATE THE CANARY or LOOK LIKE THE CAT THAT SWALLOWED THE CANARY.
cancel out
{v.} To destroy the effect of; balance or make useless. * /The boy got an "A" in history to cancel out the "C" he got in arithmetic./ * /Our track team won the mile ...
cancer stick
{n.}, {slang} A cigarette. * /Throw away that cancer stick! Smoking is bad for you!/
candle
BURN THE CANDLE AT BOTH ENDS, GAME IS NOT WORTH THE CANDLE, HOLD A CANDLE.
canned heat
{n.} Chemicals in a can which burn with a hot, smokeless flame. * /Some people use canned heat to keep food warm./ * /The mountain climbers used canned heat for ...
canned laughter
{n.}, {informal} The sounds of laughter heard on certain television programs that were obviously not recorded in front of a live audience and are played for the benefit of ...
canned music
{n.} Recorded music, as opposed to music played live. * /"Let us go to a real concert, honey," Mike said. "I am tired of all this canned music we've been listening ...
canoe
See: PADDLE ONE'S OWN CANOE.
cap
See: FEATHER IN ONE'S CAP, SET ONE'S CAP FOR, PUT ON ONE'S THINKING CAP.
cap the climax
{v. phr.} To exceed what is already a high point of achievement. * /Sam's piano recital was great, but Bill's performance capped the climax./
car pool
{n.} A group of people who own cars and take turns driving each other to work or on some other regular trip. * /It was John's father's week to drive his own car in the ...
card
See: CREDIT CARD, FLASH CARD, HOUSE OF CARDS, IN THE CARDS or ON THE CARDS, LAY ONE'S CARDS ON THE TABLE, PLAY ONE'S CARDS RIGHT, PUT ONE'S CARDS ON THE TABLE, STACK THE ...
card up one's sleeve
{n. phr.}, {informal} Another help, plan, or argument kept back and produced if needed; another way to do something. * /John knew his mother would lend him money if ...
cards stacked against one
See: STACK THE CARDS.
care
See: COULDN'T CARE LESS, HAVE A CARE, GIVE A HANG or CARE A HANG, TAKE CARE.
carpet
See: CALL ON THE CARPET, MAGIC CARPET, ROLL OUT THE RED CARPET.
carriage trade
{n.}, {literary} Rich or upper class people. * /The hotel is so expensive that only the carriage trade stays there./ * /The carriage trade buys its clothes at the best ...
carrot and stick
{n. phr.} The promise of reward and threat of punishment, both at the same time. * /John's father used the carrot and stick when he talked about his low grades./
carry
See: CASH-AND-CARRY.
carry --- off one's feet
See: KNOCK OFF ONE'S FEET, SWEEP OFF ONE'S FEET.
carry a torch
or[carry the torch] {v. phr.} 1. To show great and unchanging loyalty to a cause or a person. * /Although the others gave up fighting for their rights, John continued to carry ...
carry a tune
{v. phr.} To sing the right notes without catching any false ones. * /Al is a wonderful fellow, but he sure can't carry a tune and his singing is a pain to listen to./
carry away
{v.} To cause very strong feeling; excite or delight to the loss of cool judgment. * /The music carried her away./ * /He let his anger carry him away./ - Often used in ...
carry coals to Newcastle
{v. phr.} To do something unnecessary; bring or furnish something of which there is plenty. * /The man who waters his grass after a good rain is carrying coals to ...
carry off the palm
or[bear off the palm] {v. phr.}, {literary} To gain the victory; win. * /John carried off the palm in the tennis championship match./ * /Our army bore off the palm in the ...
carry on
{v.} 1. To cause death of; kill. * /Years ago smallpox carried off hundreds of Indians of the Sioux tribe./ Compare: WIPE OUT. 2. To succeed in winning. * /Bob carried ...
carry one's cross
or {literary}[bear one's cross] {v. phr.} To live with pain or trouble; keep on even though you suffer or have trouble. * /Weak ankles are a cross Joe carries while the ...
carry out
{v.} To put into action; follow; execute. * /The generals were determined to carry out their plans to defeat the enemy./ * /John listened carefully and carried ...
carry over
{v.} 1. To save for another time. * /The store had some bathing suits it had carried over from last year./ * /What you learn in school should carry over into adult ...
carry the ball
{v. phr.}, {informal} To take the most important or difficult part in an action or business. * /None of the other boys would tell the principal about their breaking the ...
carry the banner
{v. phr.} To support a cause or an ideal with obvious advocacy. * /Our college is carrying the banner for saving the humpback whale, which is on the list of endangered ...
carry the day
{v. phr.}, {informal} To win completely; to succeed in getting one's aim accomplished. * /The defense attorney's summary before the jury helped him carry the day./
carry the torch
See: CARRY A TORCH.
carry the weight of the world on one's shoulders
See: WEIGHT OF THE WORLD ON ONE'S SHOULDERS.
carry through
{v.} 1a. To put into action. * /Mr. Green was not able to carry through his plans for a hike because he broke his leg./ 1b. To do something you have planned; put a plan into ...
carry weight
{n.} To be influential; have significance and/or clout; impress. * /A letter of recommendation from a full professor carries more weight than a letter from an assistant ...
carrying charge
{n.} An extra cost added to the price of something bought on weekly or monthly payments. * /The price of the bicycle was $50. Jim bought it for $5.00 a month for ten ...
cart before the horse (to put)
{n. phr.}, {informal} Things in wrong order; something backwards or mixed up. - An overused expression. Usually used with "put" but sometimes with "get" or ...
cart off
or[cart away] {v.}, {informal} To take away, often with force or with rough handling or behavior. * /The police carted the rioters off to jail./ * /When Bobby wouldn't ...
carved
or[chiseled] or[inscribed in granite] /[written in stone] {adj. phr.} Holy; unchangeable; noble and of ancient origin. * /You should wear shoes when you come to class, ...
case
See: BASKET CASE, CIRCUMSTANCES ALTER CASES, COUCH CASE, GET DOWN TO BRASS TACKS also GET DOWN TO CASES, IN ANY CASE, IN CASE or IN THE EVENT, IN CASE OF also IN THE ...
case in point
{n. phr.} An example that proves something or helps to make something clearer. * /An American can rise from the humblest beginnings to become President. Abraham Lincoln is a ...
case the joint
{v. phr.}, {slang} 1. To study the layout of a place one wishes to burglarize. * /The hooded criminals carefully cased the joint before robbing the neighborhood ...
cash
See: COLD CASH.
cash crop
{n.} A crop grown to be sold. * /Cotton is a cash crop in the South./ * /They raise potatoes to eat, but tobacco is their cash crop./
cash in
{v.} 1. To exchange (as poker chips or bonds) for the value in money. * /He paid the bill by cashing in some bonds./ * /When the card game ended, the players cashed in ...
cash in on
{v.}, {informal} To see (a chance) and profit by it; take advantage of (an opportunity or happening). * /Mr. Brown cashed in on people's great interest in camping and ...
cash on the barrelhead
{n. phr.}, {informal} Money paid at once; money paid when something is bought. * /Father paid cash on the barrelhead for a new car./ * /Some lawyers want cash ...
cash-and-carry(1)
{adj.} Selling things for cash money only and letting the customer carry them home, not having the store deliver them; also sold in this way. * /This is a cash-and-carry ...
cash-and-carry(2)
{adv}. With no credit, no time payments, and no deliveries. * /Some stores sell cash-and-carry only./ * /It is cheaper to buy cash-and-carry./
cast
or[shed] or[throw light upon] {v. phr.} To explain; illuminate; clarify. * /The letters that were found suddenly cast a new light on the circumstances of Tom's ...
cast about
also[cast around] {v.}, {literary} 1. To look everywhere; search. * /The committee was casting about for an experienced teacher to take the retiring principal's ...
cast down
{adj.} Discouraged; sad; unhappy. - Used less often than the reverse form, "downcast". * /Mary was cast down at the news of her uncle's death./ * /Charles felt cast ...
cast in one's lot with
{formal} See: THROW IN ONE'S LOT WITH.
cast off
{v.} 1a. or[cast loose] To unfasten; untie; let loose (as a rope holding a boat). * /The captain of the boat cast off the line and we were soon out in open water./ ...
cast one's lot with
See: THROW IN ONE'S LOT WITH.
cast out
{v.}, {formal} To force (someone) to go out or away; banish; expel. * /After the scandal, he was cast out of the best society./ Compare: CAST OFF(3).
cast pearls before swine
or[cast one's pearls before swine] {n. phr.}, {literary} To waste good acts or valuable things on someone who won't understand or be thankful for them, just as pigs ...
cast the first stone
{v. phr.}, {literary} To be the first to blame someone, lead accusers against a wrongdoer. * /Jesus said that a person who was without sin could cast the first stone./ ...
cast up
{v.}, {literary} 1. To turn or direct upward; raise. * /The dying missionary cast up his eyes to heaven and prayed./ 2. {archaic} To do sums; do a problem in addition; ...
castle in the air
See: BUILD CASTLES IN THE AIR.
castles in Spain
See: CASTLES IN THE AIR.
cat
See: COPY CAT, CURIOSITY KILLED THE CAT, FRAIDY-CAT or FRAID-CAT or SCAREDY CAT OY SCARED-CAT, HOLY CATS, LET THE CAT OUT OF THE BAG, LOOK LIKE THE CAT THAT ATE THE ...
cat got one's tongue
You are not able or willing to talk because of shyness. Usually used about children or as a question to children. * /Tommy's father asked Tommy if the cat had got his ...
cat has nine lives
A cat can move so fast and jump so well that he seems to escape being killed many times. * /We thought our cat would be killed when he fell from the roof of the ...
cat's meow
or[cat's pajamas] {n.}, {slang} Something very wonderful, special, or good. * /John's new hike is really the cat's meow./ * /Mary's party is going to be the cat's ...
catch
See: EARLY BIRD CATCHES THE WORM, FAIR CATCH, SHOESTRING CATCH.
catch cold
{v. phr.} 1. or[take cold] To get a common cold-weather sickness that causes a running nose, sneezing, and sometimes sore throat and fever or other symptoms. * ...
catch (someone) dead
{v. phr.}, {informal} To see or hear (someone) in an embarrassing act or place at any time. Used in the negative usually in the passive. * /You won't catch Bill dead ...
catch at
{v.} 1. To try to catch suddenly; grab for. * /The boy on the merry-go-round caught at the brass ring, but did not get it./ 2. To seize quickly; accept mentally or ...
catch at a straw
See: GRASP AT STRAWS.
catch fire
{v. phr.} 1. To begin to burn. * /When he dropped a match in the leaves, they caught fire./ 2. To become excited. * /The audience caught fire at the speaker's words and ...
catch flat-footed
See: FLAT-FOOTED(2).
catch forty winks
See: FORTY WINKS.
catch hold of
{v. phr.} To grasp a person or a thing. * /"I've been trying to catch hold of you all week," John said, "but you were out of town."/ * /The mountain climber successfully ...
catch it
or[get it] {v. phr.}, {informal} To be scolded or punished. - Usually used of children. * /John knew he would catch it when he came home late for supper./ * /Wow, ...
catch it in the neck
or[get it in the neck] {v. phr.}, {slang} To be blamed or punished. * /Tom got it in the neck because he forgot to close the windows when it rained./ * /Students get it in ...
catch off balance
{v. phr.} To confront someone with physical force or with a statement or question he or she is not prepared to answer or deal with; to exploit the disadvantage of ...
catch off guard
{v. phr.} To challenge or confront a person at a time of lack of preparedness or sufficient care. * /The suspect was caught off guard by the detective and confessed where ...
catch on
{v.}, {informal} 1. To understand; learn about. - Often used with "to". * /You'll catch on to the job after you've been here awhile./ * /Don't play any tricks on Joe. When ...
catch one's death of
or[take one's death of] {v. phr.}, {informal} To become very ill with (a cold, pneumonia, flu). * /Johnny fell in the icy water and almost took his death of cold./ ...
catch one's breath
{v. phr.} 1. To breathe in suddenly with fear or surprise. * /The beauty of the scene made him catch his breath./ Compare: TAKE ONE'S BREATH AWAY. 2a. To rest and get ...
catch one's eye
{v. phr.} To attract your attention. * /I caught his eye as he moved through the crowd, and waved at him to come over./ * /The dress in the window caught her eye when she ...
catch red-handed
{v. phr.} /To apprehend a person during the act of committing an illicit or criminal act./ * /Al was caught red-handed at the local store when he was trying to walk out with a ...
catch sight of
{v. phr.} To see suddenly or unexpectedly. * /Allan caught sight of a kingbird in a maple tree./ Contrast: LOSE SIGHT OF.
catch some rays
{v. phr.}, {slang}, {informal} To get tanned while sunbathing. * /Tomorrow I'll go to the beach and try to catch some rays./
catch some Z's
{v. phr.}, {slang}, {informal} To take a nap, to go to sleep. (Because of the "z" sound resembling snoring.) * /I want to hit the sack and catch some Z's./
catch up
{v.} 1. To take or pick up suddenly; grab (something). * /She caught up the book from the table and ran out of the room./ 2. To capture or trap (someone) in a situation; ...
catch with one's pants down
{v. phr.}, {slang} To surprise someone in an embarrassing position or guilty act. * /They thought they could succeed in the robbery, but they got caught with ...
catch-22
{n.}, {informal} From Joseph Heller's novel "Catch-22", set in World War II. 1. A regulation or situation that is self-contradictory or that conflicts with ...
catch-as-catch-can(1)
{adv. phr.} In a free manner; in any way possible; in the best way you can. * /On moving day everything is packed and we eat meals catch-as-catch-can./
catch-as-catch-can(2)
{adj. phr.} Using any means or method; unplanned; free. * /Rip van Winkle seems to have led a catch-as-catch-can life./ * /Politics is rather a ...
cathouse
{n.}, {slang} A house of ill repute, a house of prostitution. * /Massage parlors are frequently cathouses in disguise./
caught short
{adj. phr.}, {informal} Not having enough of something when you need it. * /Mrs. Ford was caught short when the newspaper boy came for his money a day early./ * /The ...
cause eyebrows to raise
{v. phr.} To do something that causes consternation; to shock others. * /When Algernon entered Orchestra Hall barefoot and wearing a woman's wig, he caused eyebrows to ...
cause tongues to wag
See: TONGUES TO WAG.
caution
See: THROW CAUTION TO THE WINDS.
cave in
{v.} 1. To fall or collapse inward. * /The mine caved in and crushed three miners./ * /Don't climb on that old roof. It might cave in./ 2. {informal} To weaken and be ...
cease fire
{v.} To give a military command ordering soldiers to stop shooting. * /"Cease fire!" the captain cried, and the shooting stopped./
cease-fire
{n.} A period of negotiated nonaggression, when the warring parties involved promise not to attack. * /Unfortunately, the cease-fire in Bosnia was broken many times by all ...
ceiling
See: HIT THE CEILING or HIT THE ROOF.
cent
See: TWO CENTS, WORTH A CENT.
center
See: FRONT AND CENTER, OFF-CENTER, SHOPPING CENTER.
century
See: TURN OF THE CENTURY.
ceremony
See: STAND ON CEREMONY.
certain
See: FOR SURE or FOR CERTAIN.
chain gang
{n.} A group of convicts or slaves in the old South who were chained together. * /Chain gangs are no longer an acceptable way of punishment, according to modern ...
chain letter
{n.} A letter which each person receiving it is asked to copy and send to several others. * /Most chain letters die out quickly./
chain stores
{n.} A series of stores in different locations, joined together under one ownership and general management. * /The goods in chain stores tend to be more uniform ...
chain-smoke
{v.} To smoke cigarettes or cigars one after another without stopping. * /Mr. Jones is very nervous. He chain-smokes cigars./[chain smoker] {n.} * /Mr. Jones is ...
chained to the oars
{adj. phr.} The condition of being forced to do strenuous and unwelcome labor against one's wishes for an extended period of time. * /Teachers in large public schools ...
chair
See: MUSICAL CHAIRS.
chalk
See: WALK THE CHALK.
chalk up
{v.}, {informal} 1. To write down as part of a score; record. * /The scorekeeper chalked up one more point for the home team./ 2. To make (a score or part of a score); ...
champ at the bit
{v. phr.} To be eager to begin; be tired of being held back; want to start. * /The horses were champing at the bit, anxious to start racing./ * /As punishment John ...

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