Слова на букву bum -come (459) Словарь американских идиом
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EN-DE-FR →  Словарь американских идиом →  --- -be m be n-bull bum -come come-does dog-fill fill-get get -hard hard-in a in a-keep keep-long long-nest nest-open open-pull pull-scen sche-so b so b-take take-turn turn-word


Слова на букву bum -come (459)

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chance
See: BY CHANCE, FAT CHANCE, STAND A CHANCE, TAKE A CHANCE.
chance it
{v. phr.} To be willing to risk an action whose outcome is uncertain. * /"Should we take the boat out in such stormy weather?" Jim asked. "We can chance it," Tony ...
chance on
also[chance upon] {v.} To happen to find or meet; find or meet by accident. * /On our vacation we chanced upon an interesting antique store./ * /Mary dropped her ring in ...
change
See: RING THE CHANGES.
change color
{v. phr.} 1. To become pale. * /The sight was so horrible that Mary changed color from fear./ * /Bill lost so much blood from the cut that he changed color./ 2. To ...
change hands
{v. phr.} To change or transfer ownership. * /Ever since our apartment building changed hands, things are working a lot better./
change horses in the middle of a stream
or[change horses in midstream] {v. phr.} To make new plans or choose a new leader in the middle of an important activity. * /When a new President is to be elected ...
change of heart
{n. phr.} A change in the way one feels or thinks about a given task, idea or problem to be solved. * /Joan had a change of heart and suddenly broke off her engagement to ...
change of life
{n. phr.} The menopause (primarily in women). * /Women usually undergo a change of life in their forties or fifties./
change of pace
{n. phr.} A quick change in what you are doing. * /John studied for three hours and then read a comic book for a change of pace./ * /The doctor told the man he needed a ...
change off
{v.}, {informal} To take turns doing something; alternate. * /John and Bill changed off at riding the bicycle./ * /Bob painted one patch of wall and then he changed off ...
change one's mind
{v. phr.} To alter one's opinion or judgment on a given issue. * /I used to hate Chicago, but as the years passed I gradually changed my mind and now I actually love ...
change one's tune
{v. phr.}, {informal} To make a change in your story, statement, or claim; change your way of acting. * /The man said he was innocent, but when they found the stolen money in ...
change up
See: LET UP(4).
character
See: IN CHARACTER.
charge
See: CARRYING CHARGE, CHARGE OFF(2), IN CHARGE, IN CHARGE OF, TAKE CHARGE.
charge account
{n.} An agreement with a store through which you can buy things and pay for them later. * /Mother bought a new dress on her charge account./ * /Mr. Jones has a charge ...
charge off
{v.} 1. To consider or record as a loss, especially in an account book. * /The store owner charged off all of the last season's stock of suits./ Syn.: WRITE OFF(1). ...
charge something to something
{v.} 1. To place the blame on; make responsible for. * /John failed to win a prize, but he charged it to his lack of experience./ * /The coach charged the loss of the game to ...
charge up
{v. phr.} 1. To submit to a flow of electricity in order to make functional. * /I mustn't forget to charge up my razor before we go on our trip./ 2. To use up all the ...
charge with
{v. phr.} To accuse someone in a court of law. * /The criminal was charged with aggravated kidnapping across a state line./
charmed life
{n.} A life often saved from danger; a life full of lucky escapes. * /He was in two airplane accidents, but he had a charmed life./ * /During the war a bullet knocked ...
chase
See: GIVE CHASE, GO CHASE ONESELF, LEAD A MERRY CHASE.
chase after
See: RUN AFTER.
chase around
See: RUN AROUND.
cheapskate
{n.}, {informal} A selfish or stingy person; a person who will not spend much. - An insulting term. * /None of the girls like to go out on a date with him because he is a ...
cheat on someone
{v. phr.}, {informal} To be unfaithful (to one's wife or husband, or to one's sweetheart or fiancee). * /It is rumored that Joe cheats on his wife./
check
See: BLANK CHECK, CLAIM CHECK, DOUBLE CHECK, IN CHECK, RAIN CHECK, RUBBER CHECK, SALES CHECK.
check in
{v.} 1a. To sign your name (as at a hotel or convention). * /The last guests to reach the hotel checked in at 12 o'clock./ Contrast: CHECK OUT. 1b. {informal} ...
check off
{v.} To put a mark beside (the name of a person or thing on a list) to show that it has been counted. * /The teacher checked off each pupil as he got on the bus./ * ...
check on someone/thing
or[check up on someone/thing] {v}. To try to find out the truth or rightness of; make sure of; examine; inspect; investigate. * /We checked on Dan's age by getting his birth ...
check out
{v.} 1a. To pay your hotel bill and leave. * /The last guests checked out of their rooms in the morning./ Contrast: CHECK IN. 1b. {informal} To go away; leave. * /I hoped our ...
check up
{v.} To find out or try to find out the truth or correctness of something; make sure of something; investigate. * /Mrs. Brown thought she had heard a burglar in the ...
check with
{v. phr.} 1. To consult. * /I want to check with my lawyer before I sign the papers./ 2. To agree with. * /Does my reconciliation of our account check with the ...
check-up
{n.} A periodic examination by a physician or of some equipment by a mechanic. * /I am overdue for my annual physical check-up./ * /I need to take my car in for a ...
cheek
See: TURN THE OTHER CHEEK.
cheer
See: BRONX CHEER.
cheer on
{v. phr.} To vociferously encourage a person or a team during a sports event. * /The spectators at the stadium cheered on their home team./
cheer up
{v.} 1. To feel happy; stop being sad or discouraged; become hopeful, joyous, or glad. * /Jones was sad at losing the business, but he cheered up at the sight of ...
cheese
See: BIG CHEESE, WHOLE CHEESE.
cheesebox
{n.}, {slang} A small, suburban house built by a land developer available at low cost and resembling the other houses around it. * /They moved to a suburb, but their house is ...
cheesecake
{n.}, {slang}, {informal} A showing of the legs of an attractive woman or a display of her breasts as in certain magazines known as cheesecake magazines. * /Photographer to ...
cherry farm
{n.}, {slang} A correctional institution of minimal security where the inmates, mostly first offenders, work as farmhands. * /Joe got a light sentence and was sent to a ...
chest
See: OFF ONE'S CHEST, ON ONE'S CHEST.
chew
See: BITE OFF MORE THAN ONE CAN CHEW.
chew out
{v.}, {slang} To scold roughly. * /The boy's father chewed him out for staying up late./ * /The coach chews out lazy players./ Syn.: BAWL OUT, CALL ON THE CARPET, ...
chew the fat
or[chew the rag] {v. phr.}, {slang} To talk together in an idle, friendly fashion; chat. * /We used to meet after work, and chew the fat over coffee and doughnuts./ ...
chew the scenery
{v. phr.}, {slang} To act overemotionally in a situation where it is inappropriate; to engage in histrionics. * /I don't know if Joe was sincere about our house, but he sure ...
chicken
See: COUNT ONE'S CHICKENS BEFORE THEY ARE HATCHED, GO TO BED WITH THE CHICKENS, SPRING CHICKEN.
chicken feed
{n.}, {slang} A very small sum of money. * /John and Bill worked very hard, but they were only paid chicken feed./ * /Mr. Jones is so rich be thinks a thousand dollars is ...
chicken out
{v. phr.}, {informal} To stop doing something because of fear; to decide not to do something after all even though previously having decided to try it. * /I used to ...
chicken switch
{n.}, {slang}, {Space English} 1. The emergency eject button used by test pilots in fast and high flying aircraft by means of which they can parachute to safety if the ...
chicken-brained
{adj.} Stupid; narrow-minded; unimaginative. * /I can't understand how a bright woman like Helen can date such a chicken-brained guy as Oliver./
chicken-hearted
{adj.} Cowardly; excessively timid. * /"Come on, let's get on that roller coaster," she cried. "Don't be so chicken-hearted."/ See: CHICKEN-LIVERED.
chicken-livered
{adj.}, {slang}, {colloquial} Easily scared; cowardly. * /Joe sure is a chicken-livered guy./ See: CHICKEN-HEARTED.
chickens come home to roost
{informal} Words or acts come back to cause trouble for a person; something bad you said or did receives punishment; you get the punishment that you deserve. * ...
child
See: BURNT CHILD DREADS THE FIRE, WITH CHILD.
child's play
{adj.} Easy; requiring no effort. * /Mary's work as a volunteer social worker is so agreeable to her that she thinks of it as child's play./
children and fools speak the truth
Children and fools say things without thinking; they say what they think or know when grown-ups might not think it was polite or wise to do so. - A proverb. * /"Uncle ...
children should be seen and not heard
A command issued by adults to children ordering them to be quiet and not to interrupt. - A proverb. * /Your children should not argue so loudly. Haven't you taught ...
chill
See: SPINE-CHILLING.
chime in
{v.} 1. {informal} To join in. * /The whole group chimed in on the chorus./ * /When the argument got hot, John chimed in./ 2. To agree; go well together. - Usually used with ...
chin
See: KEEP ONE'S CHIN UP, STICK ONE'S NECK OUT or STICK ONE'S CHIN OUT, TAKE IT ON THE CHIN, UP TO THE CHIN IN.
china shop
See: BULL IN A CHINA SHOP.
China syndrome
{n.}, {informal} From the title of the movie with Jane Fonda and Jack Lemmon. The possibility that an industrial nuclear reactor might explode, literally affecting the other ...
chip
See: CASH IN ONE'S CHIPS at CASH-IN, IN THE CHIPS. LET THE CHIPS FALL WHERE THEY MAY, FISH-AND-CHIPS, WHEN THE CHIPS ARE DOWN.
chip in
or[kick in] {v.}, {informal} To give together with others, contribute. * /The pupils chipped in a dime apiece for the teacher's Christmas present./ * /All the ...
chip off the old block
{n. phr.} A person whose character traits closely resemble those of his parents. * /I hear that Tom plays the violin in the orchestra his father conducts; he sure is a chip ...
chip on one's shoulder
{n. phr.}, {informal} A quarrelsome nature; readiness to be angered. * /He went through life with a chip on his shoulder./ * /Jim often gets into fights because he goes ...
chips
See: WHEN THE CHIPS ARE DOWN.
chisel
or[muscle in on] {v. phr.} To illegitimately and forcefully intrude into someone's traditional sales or professional arena of operation. * /Tim has a good sales ...
choice
See: BY CHOICE, FIELDER'S CHOICE.
choke off
{v.} To put a sudden end to; stop abruptly or forcefully. * /It was almost time for the meeting to end, and the presiding officer had to move to choke off debate./ ...
choke up
{v.} 1a. To come near losing calmness or self-control from strong feeling; be upset by your feelings. * /When one speaker after another praised John, he choked up and ...
choose
See: PICK AND CHOOSE.
choose up sides
{v. phr.} To form two teams with two captains taking turns choosing players. * /The boys chose up sides for a game of softball./ * /Tom and Joe were the captains. They chose ...
chooser
See: BEGGARS CAN'T BE CHOOSERS.
chop
See: LICK ONE'S CHOPS.
chow line
{n.}, {slang} A line of people waiting for food. * /The chow line was already long when John got to the dining hall./ * /The soldiers picked up trays and got into the chow ...
Christmas
See: FATHER CHRISTMAS.
Christmas card
{n.}, {slang}, {citizen's band radio jargon} A speeding ticket. * /Smokey just gave a Christmas card to the eighteen wheeler we passed./
Christmas club
{n.} A plan for putting money in the bank to be saved for Christmas shopping. * /John deposits $10 each week in the Christmas club./ * /The woman will get her ...
chum around with
{v. phr.} 1. To be close friends with someone. * /They have been chumming around with one another for quite some time./ 2. To travel around with someone. * /Jack is planning to ...
cigar-store Indian
{n. phr.} A wooden statue of an Indian which in the past was placed in front of a cigar store. * /A cigar store Indian used to mean a cigar store in the same way a ...
circle
See: COME FULL CIRCLE, IN A CIRCLE or IN CIRCLES, RUN CIRCLES AROUND also RUN RINGS AROUND.
circulation
See: IN CIRCULATION, OUT OF CIRCULATION.
circumstance
See: UNDER THE CIRCUMSTANCES also IN THE CIRCUMSTANCES.
circumstances alter cases
{formal} The way things are, or happen, may change the way you are expected to act. * /John's father told him never to touch his gun, but one day when Father was away, John ...
circus
See: THREE-RING CIRCUS.
citizen
See: SENIOR CITIZEN.
civil
See: KEEP A CIVIL TONGUE IN ONE'S HEAD.
claim
See: STAKE A CLAIM.
claim check
{n.} A ticket needed to get back something. * /The man at the parking lot gave Mrs. Collins a claim check./ * /The boy put the dry cleaning claim check in his ...
clam up
{v.}, {slang} To refuse to say anything more; stop talking. * /The suspect clammed up, and the police could get no more information out of him./
clamp down
{v.}, {informal} To put on strict controls; enforce rules or laws. * /After the explosion, police clamped down and let no more visitors inside the monument./ * /The school ...
class
See: HIGH-CLASS, SECOND CLASS.
clay
See: FEET OF CLAY.
clay pigeon
{n.}, {slang}, {informal} 1. A popular target at practice shooting made of clay and roughly resembling a pigeon; an easy target that doesn't move. * /All he can shoot ...
clean
See: COME CLEAN, KEEP ONE'S NOSE CLEAN, MAKE A CLEAN BREAST OF, NEW BROOM SWEEPS CLEAN, TAKE TO ONE'S HEELS, also SHOW A CLEAN PAIR OF HEELS.
clean bill of health
{n. phr.} 1. A certificate that a person or animal has no infectious disease. * /The government doctor gave Jones a clean bill of health when he entered the country./ 2. ...
clean break
{n. phr.} A complete separation. * /Tom made a clean break with his former girlfriends before marrying Pamela./
clean hands
{n. phr.}, {slang} Freedom from guilt or dishonesty; innocence. * /John grew up in a bad neighborhood, but he grew up with clean hands./ * /There was much proof against Bill, ...
clean out
{v.} 1. {slang} To take everything from; empty; strip. * /George's friends cleaned him out when they were playing cards last night./ * /The sudden demand for paper plates ...
clean slate
{n. phr.} A record of nothing but good conduct, without any errors or bad deeds; past acts that are all good without any bad ones. * /Johnny was sent to the principal ...
clean sweep
{n. phr.} A complete victory. * /Our candidate for the United States Senate made a clean sweep over his opponent./
clean up
{v. phr.} 1. To wash and make oneself presentable. * /After quitting for the day in the garage, Tim decided to clean up and put on a clean shirt./ 2. To finish; ...
clean-up
{n.} 1. An act of removing all the dirt from a given set of objects. * /What this filthy room needs is an honest clean-up./ 2. The elimination of pockets of resistance during ...
cleaners
See: TO TAKE TO THE CLEANERS.
clear
See: COAST IS CLEAR, IN THE CLEAR, OUT OF THE BLUE or OUT OF A CLEAR SKY or OUT OF A CLEAR BLUE SKY, SEE ONE'S WAY CLEAR, STEER CLEAR OF.
clear the air
{v. phr.} To remove angry feelings, misunderstanding, or confusion. * /The President's statement that he would run for office again cleared the air of rumors and ...
clear one's name
{v. phr.} To prove someone is innocent of a crime or misdeed of which he has been accused. * /The falsely accused rapist has been trying in vain to clear his name./
clear out
{v.} 1. To take everything out of; empty. * /When Bill was moved to another class he cleared out his desk./ 2. {informal} To leave suddenly; go away; depart. * /The cop told ...
clear the decks
{v. phr.} To put everything in readiness for a major activity; to eliminate unessentials. * /The governor urged the State Assembly to clear the decks of all but the most ...
clear up
{v.} 1. To make plain or clear; explain; solve. * /The teacher cleared up the harder parts of the story./ * /Maybe we can clear up your problem./ 2. To become clear. * ...
clear-cut
{adj.} Definite; well defined. * /The president's new policy of aggressive action is a clear-cut departure from his old methods of unilateral appeasement./
clear-eyed
{adj.} Understanding problems or events clearly; being able to tell very well the results of a way of acting. * /Tom is very clear-eyed. He knows he doesn't have much chance ...
clerk
See: ROOM CLERK or DESK CLERK.
clifihanger
{n.}, {informal} A sports event or a movie in which the outcome is uncertain to the very end keeping the spectators in great suspense and excitement. * /Did you see "The ...
climb
See: SOCIAL CLIMBER.
climb on the bandwagon
See: ON THE BANDWAGON.
climb the wall
{v. phr.}, {slang}, {informal} 1. To react to a challenging situation with too great an emotional response, frustration, tension, and anxiety. * /By the time I got ...
cling to one's mother's apron strings
See: TIED TO ONE'S MOTHER'S APRON STRINGS.
clinging vine
{n.} A very dependent woman; a woman who needs much love and encouragement from a man. * /Mary is a clinging vine; she cannot do anything without her husband./
clip joint
{n.}, {slang} A low-class night club or other business where people are cheated. * /The man got drunk and lost all his money in a clip joint./ * /The angry woman said the ...
clip one's wings
{v. phr.} To limit or hold you back, bring you under control; prevent your success. * /When the new president tried to become dictator, the generals soon clipped his ...
cloak-and-dagger
{adj.} Of or about spies and secret agents. * /It was a cloak-and-dagger story about some spies who tried to steal atomic secrets./ * /The book was written by a retired ...
clock
See: AGAINST TIME or AGAINST THE CLOCK, AROUND THE CLOCK or THE CLOCK AROUND, PUT BACK THE CLOCK or TURN BACK THE CLOCK, GO LIKE CLOCKWORK or GO OFF LIKE CLOCKWORK, ...
clock watcher
{n. phr.}, {informal} A worker who always quits at once when it is time; a man who is in a hurry to leave his job. * /When Ted got his first job, his father told him to ...
close the books
{v. phr.} To stop taking orders; end a bookkeeping period. * /The tickets were all sold, so the manager said to close the books./ * /The department store closes its ...
close to home
{adv. phr.} Too near to someone's personal feelings, wishes, or interests. * /When John made fun of Bob's way of walking, he struck close to home./ * /When the preacher ...
close at hand
{adj. phr.} Handy; close by; within one's range. * /My calendar isn't close at hand, so I can't tell you whether we can come next week or not./ * /I always keep my pencils and ...
close call
or[shave] {n. phr.} A narrow escape. * /That sure was a close call when that truck came near us from the right!/ * /When Tim fell off his bicycle in front of a bus, it was a ...
close down
or[shut down] {v.} To stop all working, as in a factory; stop work entirely; also: to stop operations in. * /The factory closed down for Christmas./ * /The ...
close in
{v.} To come in nearer from all sides. * /We wanted the boat to reach shore before the fog closed in./ - Often used with "on". * /The troops were closing in on the enemy.
close its doors
{v. phr.} 1. To keep someone or something from entering or joining; become closed. * /The club has closed its doors to new members./ 2. To fail as a business; go bankrupt. ...
close one's eyes
or[shut one's eyes] {v. phr.} To refuse to see or think about. * /The park is beautiful if you shut your eyes to the litter./ * /The ice was very thin, but the boys shut their ...
close quarters
{n. phr.} Limited, cramped space. * /With seven boy scouts in a tent, they were living in very close quarters./
close ranks
{v. phr.} 1. To come close together in a line especially for fighting. * /The soldiers closed ranks and kept the enemy away from the bridge./ 2. To stop quarreling ...
close shave
See: CLOSE CALL.
close the door
or[bar the door] or[shut the door] {v. phr.} To prevent any more action or talk about a subject. * /The President's veto closed the door to any new attempt to pass the ...
close up shop
{v. phr.} 1. To shut a store at the end of a day's business, also, to end a business. * /The grocer closes up shop at 5 o'clock./ * /After 15 years in business at the ...
close-knit
{adj.} Closely joined together by ties of love, friendship, or common interest; close. * /The Joneses are a close-knit family./ * /The three boys are always ...
close-up
{n.} A photograph, motion picture, or video camera shot taken at very close range. * /Directors of movies frequently show close-ups of the main characters./
closed book
{n.} A secret; something not known or understood. * /The man's early life is a closed book./ * /For Mary, science is a closed book./ * /The history of the town is a ...
closed shop
{n. phr.} 1. A plant or factory that employs only union workers. * /Our firm has been fighting the closed shop policy for many years now./ 2. A profession or line of ...
closed-door
{adj.} Away from the public; in private or in secret; limited to a few. * /The officers of the club held a closed-door meeting./ * /The committee decided on a ...
closet
See: SKELETON IN THE CLOSET.
clothes
See: BEST BIB AND TUCKER or SUNDAY-GO-TO-MEETING CLOTHES.
clothing
See: WOLF IN SHEEP'S CLOTHING.
cloud
See: EVERY CLOUD HAS A SILVER LINING, IN THE CLOUDS, ON CLOUD NINE, UNDER A CLOUD.
clover
See: FOUR-LEAF CLOVER, IN CLOVER or IN THE CLOVER.
club
See: CHRISTMAS CLUB.
cluck and grunt
{n.}, {slang}, {avoid it in restaurants} The familiar restaurant dish of ham and eggs; since ham is made of pork (and pigs grunt) and eggs come from hens (which cluck.) ...
clutch
See: RIDE THE BRAKE.
coal
See: CARRY COALS TO NEWCASTLE, HAUL OVER THE COALS or RAKE OVER THE COALS, HEAP COALS OF FIRE ON ONE'S HEAD.
coast is clear
No enemy or danger is in sight; there is no one to see you. * /When the teacher had disappeared around the corner, John said, " Come on, the coast is clear."/ * /The men knew ...
coat tail
See: ON ONE'S COAT TAILS.
cock
See: GO OFF HALF-COCKED also GO OFF AT HALF COCK.
cock-and-bull story
{n. phr.} An exaggerated or unbelievable story. * /"Stop feeding me such cock-and-bull stories," the detective said to the suspect./
cockeyed
{adj.} Drunk; intoxicated. * /Frank has been drinking all day and, when we met, he was so cockeyed he forgot his own address./
cocksure
{adj.} Overconfident; very sure. * /Paul was cocksure that it wasn 't going to snow, but it snowed so much that we had to dig our way out of the house./
coffee break
{n.} A short recess or time out from work in which to rest and drink coffee. * /The girls in the office take a coffee break in the middle of the morning and the ...
coffee hour
{n.} A time for coffee or other refreshments after a meeting; a time to meet people and have refreshments. * /After the business meeting we had a coffee hour./ * /The ...
coffee table
{n.} A low table used in a living room. * /There were several magazines on the coffee table./
coffin nail
{n.}, {slang} A cigarette. * /"I stopped smoking," Algernon said. " In fact, I haven't had a coffin nail in well over a year."/
cog
See: SLIP A COG or SLIP A GEAR.
coin money
or[mint money] {v. phr.}, {informal} To make a lot of money quickly; profit heavily; gain big profit. * /Fred coined money with many cigarette vending machines and juke boxes./
cold
See: BLOOD RUNS COLD, BLOW HOT AND COLD, CATCH COLD or TAKE COLD, IN COLD BLOOD, OUT COLD, OUT IN THE COLD, PASS OUT(2), STONE-COLD, STOP COLD, THROW COLD ...
cold cash
or[hard cash] {n.} Money that is paid at the time of purchase; real money; silver and bills. * /Mr. Jones bought a new car and paid cold cash for it./ * * /Some stores ...
cold comfort
{n.} Something that makes a person in trouble feel very little better or even worse. * /When Tim lost the race, it was cold comfort to him to hear that he could try ...
cold feet
{n. phr.}, {informal} A loss of courage or nerve; a failure or loss of confidence in yourself. * /Ralph was going to ask Mary to dance with him but he got cold feet ...
cold fish
{n.}, {informal} A queer person; a person who is unfriendly or does not mix with others. * /No one knows the new doctor, he is a cold fish./ * /Nobody invites ...
cold shoulder
{n.}, {informal} Unfriendly treatment of a person, a showing of dislike for a person or of looking down on a person. - Used in the cliches "give the cold shoulder" or "turn ...
cold snap
{n.} A short time of quick change from warm weather to cold. * /The cold snap killed everything in the garden./
cold turkey
{adv.}, {slang}, {informal} 1. Abruptly and without medical aid to withdraw from the use of an addictive drug or from a serious drinking problem. * /Joe is a very brave guy; ...
cold war
{n.} A struggle that is carried on by other means and not by actual fighting; a war without shooting or bombing. * /After World War II, a cold war began between Russia ...
cold-shoulder
{v.}, {informal} To act towards a person; with dislike or scorn; be unfriendly to. * /Fred cold-shouldered his old friend when they passed on the street./ * /It is ...
collar
See: HOT UNDER THE COLLAR, ROMAN COLLAR, SAILOR COLLAR.
collective farm
{n.} A large government-run farm made by combining many small farms. * /The Russian farmers used to live on collective farms./
collector's item
{n.} Something rare or valuable enough to collect or save. * /Jimmy's mother found an old wooden doll in the attic that turned out to be a collector's item./
College Boards
{n.} A set of examinations given to test a student's readiness and ability for college. * /John got a high score on his College Boards./ * /College Boards test both ...
color
See: CHANGE COLOR, GIVE COLOR TO or LEND COLOR TO, HAUL DOWN ONE'S COLORS, HORSE OF A DIFFERENT COLOR, NAIL ONE'S COLORS TO THE MAST, OFF-COLOR or OFF-COLORED, ...
color guard
{n.} A military guard of honor for the flag of a country; also: a guard of honor to carry and protect a flag or banner (as of a club). * /There were four Marines in ...
color scheme
{n.} A plan for colors used together as decoration. * /The color scheme for the dance was blue and silver./ * /Mary decided on a pink and white color scheme for ...
comb
See: FINE-TOOTH COMB.
come
See: CHICKENS COME HOME TO ROOST, CROSS A BRIDGE BEFORE ONE COMES TO IT, EASY COME - EASY GO, FIRST COME - FIRST SERVED, GET WHAT'S COMING TO ONE, HAVE IT COMING, ...
come between
{v.} To part; divide; separate. * /John's mother-in-law came to live in his home, and as time passed she came between him and his wife./ * /Bill's hot rod came ...
come by honestly
{v. phr.}, {informal} To inherit (a characteristic) from your parents. * /Joe comes by his hot temper honestly; his father is the same way./
come in
{v.} 1. To finish in a sports contest or other competition. * /He came in second in the hundred-yard dash./ 2. To become the fashion; begin to be used. * /Swimming ...
come a cropper
1. To fall off your horse. * /John's horse stumbled, and John came a cropper./ 2. To fail. * /Mr. Brown did not have enough money to put into his business ...
come a long way
{v. phr.} To show much improvement; make great progress. * /The school has come a long way since its beginnings./ * /Little Jane has come a long way since she broke her ...
come about
{v.} To take place; happen, occur. * /Sometimes it is hard to tell how a quarrel comes about./ * /When John woke up he was in the hospital, but he didn't know how that had ...
come across
{v.} 1. or[run across] To find or meet by chance. * /He came across a dollar bill in the suit he was sending to the cleaner./ * /The other day I ran across a book ...

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