Слова на букву come-does (459) Словарь американских идиом
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EN-DE-FR →  Словарь американских идиом →  --- -be m be n-bull bum -come come-does dog-fill fill-get get -hard hard-in a in a-keep keep-long long-nest nest-open open-pull pull-scen sche-so b so b-take take-turn turn-word


Слова на букву come-does (459)

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cut one's throat
{v. phr.}, {informal} To spoil one's chances; ruin a person. * /He cut his own throat by his carelessness./ * /The younger men in the company were cutting each other's ...
cut out(1)
{v.}, {slang} 1. To stop; quit. * /All right, now - let's cut out the talking./ * /He was teasing the dog and Joe told him to cut it out./ Compare: BREAK UP(3). 2. To ...
cut out(2)
{adj.} 1. Made ready; given for action; facing. * /Mary agreed to stay with her teacher's children all day; she did not know what was cut out for her./ - Often used in ...
cut rate(1)
{n.} A lower price; a price less than usual. * /Toys are on sale at the store for cut rates./
cut short
{v.} To stop or interrupt suddenly; end suddenly or too soon. * /Rain cut short the ball game./ * /An auto accident cut short the man's life./ * /When Dick began to tell ...
cut teeth
{v. phr.} 1. To have teeth grow out through the gums. * /The baby was cross because he was cutting teeth./ 2. or[cut eye teeth] {informal} To learn something very ...
cut the ground from under
{v. phr.} {informal} To make (someone) fail; upset the plans of; spoil the argument for (a person) in advance. * /Paul wanted to he captain but we cut the ground ...
cut the mustard
{v. phr.}, {slang} To do well enough in what needs to be done; to succeed. * /His older brothers and sisters helped Max through high school, but he couldn't cut the ...
cut to pieces
{v. phr.} 1. To divide into small parts with something sharp; cut badly or completely. * /Baby has cut the newspaper to pieces with scissors./ 2. To ...
cut to the bone
{v. phr.} To make (something) the least or smallest possible amount; reduce severely; leave out everything extra or unnecessary from. * /Father cut Jane's allowance ...
cut to the quick
{v. phr.} To hurt someone's feelings deeply. * /The children 's teasing cut Mary to the quick./
cut two ways
See: CUT BOTH WAYS.
cut up
{v.} 1. {informal} To hurt the feelings of; wound. - Usually used in the passive. * /John was badly cut up when Susie gave him back his ring./ 2. {slang} To act funny or ...
cut-and-dried
{adj. phr.} Decided or expected beforehand; following the same old line; doing the usual thing. * /The decision of the judge was cut-and-dried./ * /The ways of the ...
cut-rate(2)
{adj.} Sold for a price lower than usual; selling cheap things. * /If you buy cut-rate things, be sure they are good quality first./ * /John's brother bought a cut-rate ...
cut-throat
{adj.} Severe; intense; unrelenting. * /There is cut-throat competition among the various software companies today./
cutback
{n.} An act of decreasing monetary sources. * /The cutback in military spending has caused many bases to be closed./
dab
See: SMACK-DAB or SMACK-TO DAB.
dagger
See: CLOAK-AND-DAGGER, LOOK DAGGERS.
daily dozen
{n.}, {informal} Gymnastic exercises; especially, several different exercises done daily. * /The boys did their daily dozen early each morning./
daisy
See: PUSH UP DAISIES.
dam
See: WATER OVER THE DAM.
damn
See: GIVE A HANG, NOT WORTH A TINKER'S DAMN.
damned if one does, damned if one doesn't
{adj. phr.} No matter what one does, someone is likely to criticize one. * /No matter what decisions I make, there are always some people who will approve them and those ...
dance
See: SONG AND DANCE.
dance to another tune
{v. phr.} To talk or act differently, usually better because things have changed; be more polite or obedient because you are forced to do it. * /Johnny refused to do his ...
dander
See: GET ONE'S BACK UP, GET ONE'S DANDER UP or GET ONE'S IRISH UP.
dandy
See: JIM-DANDY.
dangerous
See: A LITTLE KNOWLEDGE IS A DANGEROUS THING.
dare one to do something
{v. phr.} To challenge someone to do something. * /"I dare you to jump off that rock into the sea," Fred said to Jack./
dare say
{v. phr.} To think probable; suppose; believe. - Used in first person. * /Mary is unhappy now but I dare say she will be laughing about this tomorrow./ * /There is no more ...
dark
See: IN THE DARK, SHOT IN THE DARK, WHISTLE IN THE DARK.
dark horse
{n.}, {informal} A political candidate little known to the general voting public; a candidate who was not expected to run. * /Every once in a while a dark horse candidate ...
dark of the moon
{n. phr.}, {literary} A time when the moon is not shining or cannot be seen. * /A was the dark of the moon when the scouts reached camp and they had to use flashlights ...
darken one's door
or[darken the door] To appear, as in a doorway; enter someone's home or establishment. - Used in negative imperative sentences especially with " never" and "again". * ...
dash cold water on
See: THROW COLD WATER ON.
dash light
{n.} A light on the front inside of a car or vehicle. * /Henry stopped the car and turned on the dash lights to read the road map./
dash off
{v.} To make, do, or finish quickly; especially, to draw, paint, or write hurriedly. * /Ann took out her drawing pad and pencil and dashed off a sketch of the Indians./ * ...
date
See: DOUBLE-DATE, TO DATE.
date back
{v. phr.} To go back to a given period in the past. * /My ancestors date back to the sixteenth century./
dawn on
{v.} To become clear to. * /It dawned on Fred that he would fail the course if he did not study harder./
day
See: ALL IN A DAY'S WORK, CALL IT A DAY, CARRY THE DAY, EVERY DOG HAS HIS DAY, FATHER'S DAY, FOREVER AND A DAY, GOOD DAY, MAKE A DAY OF IT, NAME DAY, NIGHT AND DAY, ONE ...
day and night
or[night and day] {adv.} 1. For days without stopping; continually. Syn.: AROUND THE CLOCK. * /Some filling stations on great highways are open day and night 365 ...
day by day
{adv.} Gradually. * /The patient got better day by day./
day in and day out
or[day in, day out] {adv. phr.} Regularly; consistently; all the time; always. * /He plays good tennis day in and day out./ - Also used with several other time words in place ...
day in court
{n. phr.} A chance to be heard; an impartial hearing; a chance to explain what one has done. * /The letters from the faculty members to the dean gave Professor ...
day of grace
{n. phr.} An extension period after the due date of some contract or bond. * /The premium is due on the first of each month, but they allow ten days of grace./
day of reckoning
{n. phr.} 1. A time when one will be made to account for misdeeds. * /When the criminal was caught and brought to trial his victims said, "finally, the day of reckoning has ...
day off
{n.} A day on which one doesn't have to work, not necessarily the weekend. * /Monday is his day off in the restaurant, because he prefers to work on Saturdays and ...
day-to-day
{adj.} Daily; common; everyday. * /For best results, students' homework should be checked on a day-to-day basis./
daydream
{v.} To spend time in reverie; be absentminded during the day. * /John spends so much time daydreaming that he never gets anything done./
daylight
See: SCARE OUT OF ONE'S WITS or SCARE THE DAYLIGHTS OUT OF, SEE DAYLIGHT.
daylight robbery
See: HIGHWAY ROBBERY.
daylight saving time
also[daylight saving] or[daylight time] or [fast time] {n.} A way of keeping time in summer that is one or two hours ahead of standard time. - Abbreviation DST. * /Many ...
days are numbered
(Someone or something) does not have long to live or stay. * /The days of the old school building are numbered./ * /When a man becomes ninety years old, his days are ...
dazzle
See: RAZZLE-DAZZLE.
dead
See: CATCH DEAD, DROP DEAD, STONEDEAD.
dead ahead
{adv.}, {informal} Exactly in front; before. * /The school is dead ahead about two miles from here./ * /Father was driving in a fog, and suddenly he saw another car dead ...
dead and buried
{adj. phr.} Gone forever. * /Slavery is dead and buried in twentieth-century America./
dead as a doornail
{adj. phr.} Completely dead without the slightest hope of resuscitation. * /This battery is dead as a doornail; no wonder your car won't start./
dead broke
See: STONE-BROKE.
dead center
{n.} The exact middle. * /The treasure was buried in the dead center of the island./ Often used like an adverb. * /The arrow hit the circle dead center./
dead duck
{n.}, {slang} A person or thing in a hopeless situation or condition; one to whom something bad is sure to happen. * /When the pianist broke her arm, she was a dead duck./ ...
dead letter
{n. phr.} An undeliverable letter that ends up in a special office holding such letters. * /There is a dead letter office in most major cities./
dead loss
{n. phr.} A total waste; a complete loss. * /Our investment in Jack's company turned out to be a dead loss./
dead on one's feet
{adv. phr.}, {informal} Very tired but still standing or walking; too tired to do more; exhausted. * /Jimmy never leaves a job unfinished. He continues to work even when ...
dead pedal
{n.}, {slang}, {citizen's band radio jargon} A slow moving vehicle. * /Better pass that eighteen wheeler, Jack; it's a dead pedal./
dead ringer
{n. phr.} A person who strongly resembles someone else. * /Charlie is a dead ringer for his uncle./
dead set against
{adj. phr.} Totally opposed to someone or something. * /Jack is dead set against the idea of marriage, which upsets Mary./
dead tired
{adj. phr.}, {informal} Very tired; exhausted; worn out. * /She was dead tired at the end of the day's work./ Compare: DEAD ON ONE'S FEET.
dead to rights
{adv. phr.}, {informal} Without a chance of escaping blame; proven wrong. * /Mother had Bob dead to rights, because she caught him with his hand in the cookie ...
dead to the world
{adj. phr.}, {informal} 1. Fast asleep. * /Tim went to bed very late and was still dead to the world at 10 o'clock this morning./ 2. As if dead; unconscious. * /Tom ...
dead-end
{n.} A street closed at one end; a situation that leads nowhere. * /Jim drove into a dead-end street and had to back out./ * /Mary was in a dead-end job./
deadbeat
{n.}, {slang} A person who never pays his debts and who has a way of getting things free that others have to pay for. * /You'll never collect from Joe - he's a ...
deadhead
{n.}, {slang} An excessively dull or boring person. * /You'll never get John to tell a joke - he's a deadhead./
deadline
{n.} A final date by which a project, such as a term paper, is due. * /The deadline for the papers on Shakespeare is November 10./
deadpan
{adj.}, {adv.}, {slang} With an expressionless or emotionless face; without betraying any hint of emotion. * /She received the news of her husband's death ...
deaf
See: TURN A DEAF EAR TO.
deal
See: GOOD DEAL or GREAT DEAL, NEW DEAL, NO DEAL, THINK A GREAT DEAL OF, WHEEL AND DEAL.
deal in
{v. phr.} To sell; do business in a certain commodity. * /Herb's firm deals in sporting goods./
deal with
{v. phr.} 1. To conduct negotiations or business dealings with. * /John refuses to deal with the firm of Brown and Miller./ 2. To handle a problem. * /Ted is a ...
dealer
See: WHEELER-DEALER at WHEEL AND DEAL.
dear
See: FOR DEAR LIFE.
Dear John letter
{n. phr.} A note or a letter informing one that a romantic relationship or a marriage is over. * /Jane left a " Dear John letter" on the table and went home to live with ...
dear me
{interj.} Used to show surprise, fear, or some other strong feeling. * /Dear me! My purse is lost, what shall I do now?/
death
See: AT DEATH'S DOOR, BETWEEN LIFE AND DEATH, CATCH ONE'S DEATH OF or TAKE ONE'S DEATH OF, SIGN ONE'S OWN DEATH WARRANT, TO DEATH.
death knell
{n.}, {formal} 1. The ringing of a bell at a death or funeral. * /The people mourned at the death knell of their friend./ 2. {literary} Something which shows a future ...
death on
{adj. phr.}, {informal} 1. Very successful in meeting or dealing with. * /Joe is death on fast balls. He usually knocks them out of the park./ 2. Disliking or strongly ...
deck
See: HIT THE DECK, ON DECK.
decked out
{adj. phr.}, {informal} Dressed in fancy clothes; specially decorated for some festive occasion. * /The school band was decked out in bright red uniforms with brass ...
declare
See: I DECLARE.
deep
See: BETWEEN THE DEVIL AND THE DEEP BLUE SEA, GO OFF THE DEEP END, IN DEEP, KNEE-DEEP.
deep water
{n.} Serious trouble or difficulty. * /When Dad tried to take Mom's place for a day, he found himself in deep water./
deep-six
{v.}, {slang} To throw away; dispose of. * /As the police boat came near, the drug smugglers deep-sixed their cargo./ (An expression originally used by sailors, ...
defense
See: ZONE DEFENSE.
defiance
See: IN DEFIANCE OF.
degree
See: TO A DEGREE, TO THE NTH DEGREE.
deliver the goods
{v. phr.} 1. To carry things and give them to the person who wants them. * /Lee delivered the goods to the right house./ 2. {slang} To succeed in doing well what is ...
delta wave
{n.}, {informal}, {semi-technical} A brain wave 1-3 cycles per second, associated with very deep sleep. * /Good night, honey, I'm off to produce some delta waves./ ...
demand
See: IN DEMAND.
Dennis the Menace
{n. phr.} After the notorious television character played by a young boy who always creates trouble for the grownups. Any hyperactive little boy who needs calming down. ...
dent
See: MAKE A DENT IN.
deposit
See: ON DEPOSIT.
depth
See: BEYOND ONE'S DEPTH.
desk clerk
See: ROOM CLERK.
detective
See: HOUSE DETECTIVE.
devil
See: BETWEEN THE DEVIL AND THE DEEP BLUE SEA, FULL OF THE OLD NICK or FULL OF THE DEVIL, GIVE THE DEVIL HIS DUE, GO TO THE DEVIL, PLAY THE DEVIL WITH, RAISE THE ...
devil of it
or[heck of it] {n. phr.} 1. The worst or most unlucky thing about a trouble or accident; the part that is most regrettable. * /Andy lost his notebook, and the devil ...
devil to pay
{n. phr.} Great trouble. - Used after "the". * /There'll be the devil to pay when the teacher finds out who broke the window./ * /When Jim wrecked his father's car, ...
devil-may-care
{adj.} Not caring what happens; unworried. * /Johnny has a devil-may-care feeling about his school work./ * /Alfred was a devil-may-care youth but became more serious as he ...
devil-may-care attitude
{n. phr.} An attitude of no concern for financial or other loss. * /"Easy come, easy go," John said in a devil-may-care attitude when he lost all of his money during ...
dewey-eyed
See: MISTY-EYED.
diamond in the rough
{n. phr.} A very smart person without a formal education who may have untutored manners. * /Jack never went to school but he is extremely talented; he is a veritable ...
dibs
See: TO HAVE DIBS ON or TO PUT DIBS ON.
dice
See: NO DEAL or NO DICE.
Dick
See: TOM, DICK AND HARRY.
die
See: CROSS ONE'S HEART or CROSS ONE'S HEART AND HOPE TO DIE, DO-OR-DIE, NEVER SAY DIE.
die is cast
{v. phr.}, {literary} To make an irrevocable decision. (From Julius Caesar's famous words in Latin, "alea iacta est", when he crossed the river Rubicon, which ...
die away
or[die down] {v.} To come slowly to an end; grow slowly less or weaker. * /The wind died down./ * /The music died away./ * /He waited until the excitement had died down./ * ...
die in one's boots
or[die with one's boots on] {v. phr.}, {informal} To be killed or hanged rather than die in bed. * /The badmen of the Old West usually died in their boots./ * /The ...
die off
{v.} To die one at a time. * /The flowers are dying off because there has been no rain./
die on the vine
or[wither on the vine] {v. phr.} To fail or collapse in the planning stages. * /The program for rebuilding the city died on the vine./
die out
{v.} To die or disappear slowly until all gone. * /This kind of bird is dying out./ * /If you pour salt water on grass, it dies out./ * /The American colonists ...
difference
See: MAKE A DIFFERENCE, SPLIT THE DIFFERENCE.
different
See: SING A DIFFERENT TUNE or WHISTLE A DIFFERENT TUNE.
dig down
{v.}, {slang} To spend your own money. * /The school let the club use the bus and driver free for their trip, but they had to dig down to pay for gas and meals./ * /"So ...
dig in
{v.}, {informal} 1. To dig ditches for protection against an enemy attack. * /The soldiers dug in and waited for the enemy to come./ 2a. To go seriously to work; work hard. * ...
dig out
{v.} 1. To find by searching; bring out (something) that was put away. * /Jack dug his sled out of the cellar./ * /The newspaper printed an old story dug out of ...
dig up
{v.}, {informal} To find or get (something) with some effort. * /Sue dug up some useful material for her English composition./ * /Jim asked each boy to dig up ...
dilemma
See: HORNS OF A DILEMMA.
dim
See: TAKE A DIM VIEW OF.
dime a dozen
{adj. phr.}, {informal} Easy to get and so of little value; being an everyday thing because there are many of them; common. * /Mr. Jones gives A's to only one or two ...
dime store
or[five-and-dime] or[five-and-ten] {n. phr.} A store that sells things that cost little. * /Charles bought a pencil at the five-and-dime./
dine out
{v. phr.} To not eat at home but to go to a restaurant. * /"Let's dine out tonight, honey," she said to her husband. "I am tired of cooking dinner every night."/ See: ...
dint
See: BY DINT OF.
dip into
{v. phr.} 1. To scan or sample lightly and briefly (said of printed materials). * /I didn't get a chance to read all of War and Peace, but I dipped into it here and there./ 2. ...
dirt
See: EAT DIRT, HIT THE DIRT, PAY DIRT.
dirt cheap
{adj.} Extremely inexpensive. * /The apartment we are renting is dirt cheap compared to other apartments of similar size in this neighborhood./
dirty
See: AIR ONE'S DIRTY LINEN IN PUBLIC or WASH ONE'S DIRTY LINEN IN PUBLIC.
dirty look
{n.}, {informal} A look that shows dislike. * /Miss Parker sent Joe to the principal's office for giving her a dirty look./
dirty old man
{n. phr.} An older man who shows an unhealthy interest in young girls. * /"Stay away from Uncle Algernon, Sally," her mother warned. "He is a dirty old man."/
dirty one's hands
or[soil one's hands] {v. phr.} To lower or hurt one's character or good name; do a bad or shameful thing. * /The teacher warned the children not to dirty their hands by ...
dirty story
{n. phr.} An improper or obscene story. * /Uncle Bill is much too fond of telling dirty stories in order to embarrass his friends./
dirty trick
{n. phr.} A treacherous action; an unfair act. * /That was a dirty trick John played on Mary when he ran away with her younger sister./
disappear
or[evaporate] or[vanish into thin air] {v. phr.} To disappear quickly, without leaving a trace. * /Money seems to disappear into thin air these days./ * /Jack just ...
dish
See: COVERED-DISH SUPPER.
dish of tea
See: CUP OF TEA.
dish out
{v.} 1. To serve (food) from a large bowl or plate. * /Ann's mother asked her to dish out the beans./ 2. {informal} To give in large quantities. * /That teacher dished ...
dish the dirt
{v. phr.}, {slang} To gossip, to spread rumors about others. * /Stop dishing the dirt. Sally, it's really quite unbecoming!/
disk jockey
{n.} An employee at a radio station or in a dance club who puts on the records that will be broadcast. * /Jack is working as a disk jockey at the local FM station./
dispose of
{v.} 1. To throw away; give away, or sell; get rid of. * /John's father wants to dispose of their old house and buy a new one./ * /The burglars had difficulty in ...
dispute
See: IN DISPUTE.
distance
See: KEEP AT A DISTANCE, KEEP ONE'S DISTANCE.
ditch
See: LAST DITCH,
dive
See: GO INTO A TAIL SPIN or GO INTO A NOSE DIVE.
do
See: HAVE DONE, HAVE DONE WITH, HAVE TO DO WITH, LET GEORGE DO IT, LET ONE'S RIGHT HAND KNOW WHAT ONE'S LEFT HAND IS DOING, LET'S DON'T, MAKE DO, WELL-TO-DO, WHAT'S ...
do one good
or[do one's heart good] {v. phr.} To give satisfaction; please; gratify. * /It does my heart good to see those children play./
do a double take
{v. phr.}, {informal} To look again in surprise; suddenly understand what is seen or said. * /John did a double take when he saw Bill in girls' clothes./ * /When Evvie ...
do a job on
{v. phr.}, {slang} To damage badly; do harm to; make ugly or useless. * /The baby did a job on Mary's book./ * /Jane cut her hair and really did a job on herself./
do a stretch
{v. phr.} To spend time in jail serving one's sentence. * /Jake has disappeared from view for a while; he is doing a stretch for dope smuggling./
do away with
{v.} 1. To put an end to; stop. * /The teachers want to do away with cheating in their school./ * /The city has decided to do away with overhead wires./ Compare: RID OF. 2. To ...
do by someone or something
{v.} To deal with; treat. - Used with a qualifying adverb between "do" and "by". * /Andy's employer always does very well by him./
do credit
or[do credit to] also ({informal})[do proud] To add to or improve the reputation, good name, honor, or esteem of; show (you) deserve praise. * /Your neat appearance ...
do duty for
{v. phr.} To substitute for; act in place of. * /The bench often does duty for a table./
do for
{v.}, {informal} To cause the death or ruin of; cause to fail. - Used usually in the passive form "done for". * /The poor fellow is done for and will die before ...
do in
{v.}, {slang} 1. To ruin; destroy. * /Mr. Smith's business was done in by a fire that burned down his store./ 2a. To kill; murder. * /The poor man was done in by two ...
do justice to
{v. phr.} 1. To do (something) as well as you should; do properly. * /Barbara had so many things to do that she could not do justice to her lessons./ * /The newspaper ...
do one a good turn
{v. phr.} To perform an act of kindness, friendship, or help to another person, unselfishly, without expectation of reward. * /"I'll be happy to help you any ...
do one good
{v. phr.} To benefit. * /The fresh air will do you good after having been inside the house all day./
do one's best
{v. phr.} To perform at one's optimum capacity; spare no effort in fulfilling one's duties. * /"I've really done my best teaching you people," the tired professor said on ...
do one's bit
or[part] {v. phr.} To shoulder one's share of responsibility in a communal undertaking; shirk one's obligation. * /"Let me go home and rest, fellows, " John said. "I ...
do one's thing
or[do one's own thing] {v. phr.}, {informal} 1. To do what one does well and actually enjoys doing. * /Two thousand fans paid $15 each to hear the rock group do their ...
do one's worst
{v. phr.} To do one's utmost by resorting to every foul means possible. * /Hitler did his worst to drive out the Allied invasion from Europe, but he failed./
do over
{v. phr.} 1. To renovate; redecorate. * /The new owners are going to do over the entire building in the fall./ 2. To repeat. * /Please do that math problem over until you get ...
do proud
See: DO CREDIT.
do someone out of something
{v.}, {informal} To cause to lose by trickery or cheating. * /The clerk in the store did me out of $2.00 by overcharging me./
do tell
{interj.}, {informal} An inelegant expression used to show that you are a little surprised by what you hear. * /"You say George is going to get married after all ...
do the business
{v. phr.}, {informal} To do what is needed or wanted; get the job done; take proper action. * /The boys had trouble in rolling the stone, but four of them did the ...
do the honors
{v. phr.} To act as host or hostess (as in introducing guests, carving, or paying other attentions to guests.) * /The president of the club will do the honors at the ...
do the trick
{v. phr.}, {informal} To bring success in doing something; have a desired result. * /Jim was not passing in English, but he studied harder and that did the trick./ * ...
do things by halves
{v. phr.} To do things in a careless and incomplete way. * /When he reads a book he always does it by halves; he seldom finishes it./
do time
or[doing time] See: DO A STRETCH.
do to death
{v. phr.} To overdo; do something so often that it becomes extremely boring or tiresome. * /The typical car chase scene in motion pictures has been done to death./
do up
{v.} 1a. To clean and prepare for use or wear; launder. * /Ann asked her mother to do up her dress./ 1b. To put in order; straighten up; clean. * /At camp the girls ...
do up brown
{v. phr.}, {slang} To do in a thorough or complete way. * /When Jim does a job, he does it up brown./
do well by
{v. phr.} To benefit; help; treat exceptionally well. * /In his will Grandpa did well by all of his grandchildren and left each of them one million dollars./
do with
{v.} 1. To find enough for one's needs; manage. - Usually follows "can". * /Some children can do with very little spending money./ Compare: GET ALONG, MAKE DO. 2. To ...
do without
or[go without] {v.} 1. To live or work without (something you want); manage without. * /Ann said that she likes candy, but can do without it./ * /We had to go ...
do-or-die
{adj.} Strongly decided, very eager and determined. * /With a real do-or-die spirit the team scored two touchdowns in the last five minutes of the game./ * /The other army ...
Doakes
See: JOE DOAKES.
doctor
See: JUST WHAT THE DOCTOR ORDERED.
doctor up
{v. phr.} To meddle with; adulterate. * /You don't have to doctor up this basic salad with a lot of extras as I am trying to lose weight./
Doe
See: JOHN DOE.
doesn't add up to a can of beans
{v. phr.} To be of little or no value. (Said of plans, ideas, etc.) * /"That's a fairly interesting concept you got there, Mike, but the competition is bound to say that it ...

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