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Слова на букву dog-fill (459)

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dog
See: EVERY DOG HAS HIS DAY, GO TO THE DOGS, HOT DOG, LEAD A DOG'S LIFE, LET SLEEPING DOGS LIE, RAIN CATS AND DOGS.
dog days
{n. phr.} The hottest days of the year in the Northern Hemisphere (July and August). (The ancient Romans associated this time with the " Dog Star" - Sirius - which becomes ...
dog in the manger
{n. phr.} A person who is unwilling to let another use what he himself has no use for. * /Although Valerie lives alone in that big house, she is like a dog in the ...
dog one's steps
{v. phr.} To follow someone closely. * /All the time he was in Havana, Castro's police were dogging his steps./
dog's age
or[coon's age] {n.}, {informal} A very long time. Usually used after "for" or "in" with a negative. * /Charlie Brown! I haven't seen you for a coon's age./ * /Father hasn't ...
dog's life
{n. phr.} A life of misery, poverty, and unhappiness. * /Diogenes, the Greek philosopher, lived a dog's life inside an empty barrel./
dog-eat-dog(1)
{n.} A way of living in which every person tries to get what he wants for himself no matter how badly or cruelly he must treat others to get it; readiness to do anything ...
dog-eat-dog(2)
{adj.} Ready or willing to fight and hurt others to get what you want. * /During the California gold rush, men had a dog-eat-dog life./
doghouse
See: IN THE DOGHOUSE.
doing
See: NOTHING DOING.
dole out
{v. phr.} To measure out sparingly. * /Since the water ration was running low in the desert, the camp commandant doled out small cups of water to each soldier./
doll up
{v.}, {slang} 1. To dress in fine or fancy clothes. * /The girls dolled up for the big school dance of the year./ * /The girls were all dolled up for the Christmas ...
dollar
See: BET ONE'S BOTTOM DOLLAR at BET ONE'S BOOTS, FEEL LIKE A MILLION or FEEL LIKE A MILLION DOLLARS, LOOK LIKE A MILLION DOLLARS.
don't cross your bridges until you come to them
See: CROSS A BRIDGE BEFORE ONE COMES TO IT.
don't cry before you're hurt
See: CRY BEFORE ONE IS HURT.
don't let's
See: LET'S DON'T.
don't look a gift horse in the mouth
See: LOOK A GIFT HORSE IN THE MOUTH.
done for
{adj. phr.} Finished; dead. * /When the police burst in on the crooks, they knew they were done for./
done to a turn
See: TO A T or TO A TURN.
done with
{adj. phr.} Finished; completed. * /As soon as you're done with your work, give us a call./
door
See: AT DEATH'S DOOR, AT ONE'S DOOR, CLOSED-DOOR, CLOSE ITS DOORS, CLOSE THE DOOR or BAR THE DOOR or SHUT THE DOOR, DARKEN ONE S DOOR, or DARKEN THE DOOR, FOOT IN THE ...
doorstep
See: AT ONE'S DOOR or AT ONE'S DOOR-STEP.
dope out
{v.}, {slang} To think of something that explains. * /The detectives tried to dope out why the man was murdered./ Syn.: FIGURE OUT.
dose of one's own medicine
or[taste of one's own medicine] {n. phr.} Being treated in the same way you treat others; something bad done to you as you have done bad to other people. * /Jim was ...
dose out
{v.} To sell the whole of; end (a business or a business operation) by selling all the goods; also, to sell your stock and stop doing business. * /The store closed out its ...
dot
See: ON THE DOT also ON THE BUTTON.
dot the i's and cross the t's
{v. phr.} To be careful, thorough, and pay close attention to detail. * /"The best way to get an A on the final exam," the teacher said, "is for every one to dot the i's ...
double back
{v.} 1. To turn back on one's way or course. * /The escaped prisoner doubled back on his tracks./ 2. To fold over; usually in the middle. * /The teacher told Johnny to double ...
double check
{n.} A careful second check to be sure that something is right; a careful look for errors. * /The policeman made a double check on the doors in the shopping area./
double date
{n.}, {informal} A date on which two couples go together. * /John and Nancy went with Mary and Bill on a double date./
double duty
{n.} Two uses or jobs; two purposes or duties. * /Matthew does double duty. He's the janitor in the morning and gardener in the afternoon./ * /Our new washer does ...
double nickel
{adv.}, {slang}, {citizen's band radio jargon} The nationally enforced speed limit on some highways - 55 MPH. * /We'd better go double nickel on this stretch, partner; ...
double up
{v.} 1. To bend far over forward. * /Jim was hit by the baseball and doubled up with pain./ 2. To share a room, bed, or home with another. * /When relatives came for a ...
double-check
{v.} 1. To do a double check on; look at again very carefully. * /When the last typing of his book was finished, the author double-checked it./ 2. To make a double ...
double-cross
{v.} To promise one thing and deliver another; to deceive. * /The lawyer double-crossed the inventor by manufacturing the gadget instead of fulfilling his promise to ...
double-date
{v.}, {informal} To go on a double date; date with another couple. * /John and Nancy and Mary and Bill double-date./
double-header
{n.} Two games or contests played one right after the other, between the same two teams or two different pairs of teams. * /The Yankees and the Dodgers played a ...
double-park
{v.} To park a car beside another car which is at the curb. * /Jimmy's father double-parked his car and the police gave him a ticket./ * /If you double-park, you block other ...
double-talk
{n.} 1. Something said that is worded, either on purpose or by accident, so that it may be understood in two or more different ways. * /The politician avoided ...
doubt
See: GIVE THE BENEFIT OF THE DOUBT, NO DOUBT.
down and out
{adj. phr.} Without money; without a job or home; broke. * /Poor Sam lost his job after his wife had left him; he is really down and out./
down east
or[Down East] {n.} The northeast coastal part of the United States and part of Canada; especially: the coastal parts of Maine. * /Many people in Boston like to go down east ...
down in the dumps
or[down in the mouth] {adj. phr.}, {informal} Sad or discouraged; gloomy; dejected. * /The boys were certainly down in the dumps when they heard that their team had lost./
down on
{adj. phr.}, {informal} Having a grudge against; angry at. * /John is down on his teacher because she gave him a low grade./
down on one's luck
{adj.}, {informal} Having bad luck; having much trouble; not successful in life. * /Harry asked me to lend him ten dollars, because he was down on his luck./ * /The ...
down one's alley
or[up one's alley] {adj. phr.}, {slang} Suited to your tastes and abilities; what you like or like to do. * /Baseball is right down Jim's alley./ Compare: CUP OF TEA.
down one's neck
See: BREATHE DOWN ONE'S NECK.
down one's nose
See: LOOK DOWN ONE'S NOSE.
down one's throat
See: JUMP DOWN ONE'S THROAT, SHOVE DOWN ONE'S THROAT or RAM DOWN ONE'S THROAT.
down payment
{n.} A retainer paid to a prospective seller. * /How much of a down payment do you require for this new car?/
down the drain
{adj.} or {adv. phr.}, {informal} Wasted; lost. * /It is money down the drain if you spend it all on candy./ * /Our plans to go swimming went down the drain when it ...
down the hatch!
{v. phr.}, {informal} Let us drink! * /When we celebrated Mom's birthday, we all raised our glasses and cried in unison, "Down the hatch!"/
down the line
{adv. phr.}, {informal} 1. Down the road or street; straight ahead. * /The church is down the line a few blocks./ 2. All the way; completely; thoroughly. * /Bob always ...
down to the wire
{adj.}, {slang} 1. Running out of time, nearing a deadline. * /Bob is down to the wire on his project./ 2. Being financially almost broke, being very low on cash or ...
down with a disease
{adj. phr.} Ill or sick. * /Aunt Liz is down with the flu this week; she has to stay in bed./
down-and-outer
{n. phr.} A person who has lost everything and is penniless. * /Joe goes from shelter to shelter asking for food and a place to sleep; he's become a regular down-and-outer./ ...
down-at-heel
or[down-at-the-heel] or[down-at-the-heels] {adj.} Poorly kept up or dressed shabby; not neat; sloppy. * /John is always down-at-the-heels, but his sister is always very neat./ * ...
down-to-earth
{adj.} Showing good sense; practical. * /The committee's first plan for the party was too fancy, but the second was more down-to-earth./ * /Mr. Jenkins never seems ...
dozen
See: BY THE DOZEN, DAILY DOZEN, DIME A DOZEN, SIX OF ONE AND HALF-A-DOZEN OF THE OTHER.
drag in
{v.} To insist on bringing (another subject) into a discussion; begin talking about (something different.) * /No matter what we talk about, Jim drags in ...
drag on
or[drag out] {v.} 1. To pass very slowly. * /The cold winter months dragged on until we thought spring would never come./ 2. To prolong; make longer. * /The meeting would ...
drag on the market
{n. phr.} An article for which the demand has fallen off thus causing an oversupply. * /Your type of word processor went out of style and is now a drag on the market./
drag one's feet
or[drag one's heels] {v. phr.} To act slowly or reluctantly. * /The children wanted to watch television, and dragged their feet when their mother told them to go to bed./ ...
drag oneself up by one's boot straps
See: PULL ONESELF UP BY THE BOOT STRAPS.
drag out
See: DRAG ON.
drag race
{n.}, {slang} An automobile race in which the drivers try to cover a certain distance (usually one quarter mile) in the shortest possible time. * /Drag races are ...
drag strip
{n.}, {slang} A place where drag races are held. * /Before the race Paul loaded his racer onto the trailer to take it out of town to the drag strip for the race./ ...
drain
See: DOWN THE DRAIN.
draw
See: BEAT TO THE PUNCH or BEAT TO THE DRAW.
draw a bead on
{v. phr.} {informal} 1. To aim at; sight (with a gun). * /The deer bounded into the forest before the hunters could draw a bead on them./ * /John drew a bead on the ...
draw a blank
{v. phr.}, {informal} 1. To obtain nothing in return for an effort made or to get a negative result. * /I looked up all the Joneses in the telephone book but I drew a blank ...
draw a conclusion
{v. phr.} To make an inference. * /After he failed to keep an appointment with me for the third time, I drew the conclusion that he was an unreliable person./
draw a line
or[draw the line] {v. phr.} 1. To think of as different. * /The law in this country draws a line between murder and manslaughter./ * /Can you draw the line between ...
draw a long breath
or[take a long breath] {v. phr.} To breathe deeply when getting ready to speak or act. * /Father asked who broke the window. Jim drew a long breath and admitted that he ...
draw a parallel
{v. phr.} To make a comparison. * /It is easy to draw a parallel between the characters of Saint Francis of Assisi and Great Saint Theresa of Aquila, but this doesn't mean ...
draw and quarter
{v. phr.}, {literary} 1. To execute someone in the barbaric medieval fashion of having him torn into four pieces by four horses tearing his body in four different ...
draw aside
{v. phr.} To separate; take to one side. * /He drew her aside and whispered into her ear, "Johanna, please marry me!"/
draw back
{v.} To move back; back away; step backward; withdraw; move away from. * /When the man spotted the rattlesnake, he drew back and aimed his shotgun./ * /The children drew ...
draw blood
{v. phr.}, {informal} To make someone feel hurt or angry. * /If you want to draw blood, ask Jim about his last money-making scheme./ * /Her sarcastic comments ...
draw fire
{v. phr.} 1. To attract or provoke shooting; be a target. * /The general's white horse drew the enemy's fire./ 2. To bring criticism or argument; make people say bad ...
draw in one's horns
See: PULL IN ONE'S HORNS.
draw interest
{v. phr.} To earn interest on invested capital. * /My savings account draws 4.5% interest./
draw lots
{v. phr.} To select at random from a series in order to determine precedents or apportionment. * /The refugees to be evacuated drew lots on who would get a place on the first ...
draw near
{v. phr.} To approach; come near. * /The time is drawing near when this century will end and the next will begin./
draw off
{v. phr.} To drain away; deflect. * /A light flanking attack was made in order to draw off the enemy's fire./
draw on
{v. phr.} 1. To arrive; approach. * /As midnight drew on, the New Year's Eve party grew louder and louder./ 2. To secure funds from a bank or person. * /Jack kept drawing on ...
draw out
{v. phr.} 1. To take out; remove. * /Johnny drew a dollar out of the bank to buy his mother a present./ * /The hunter drew out his gun and shot the snake./ 2. To ...
draw the fire of
See: DRAW OFF.
draw the line
See: DRAW A LINE.
draw to a close
{v. phr.} To finish; terminate; come to an end. * /The meeting drew to a close around midnight./
draw up
{v.} 1. To write (something) in its correct form; put in writing. * /The rich man had his lawyers draw up his will so that each of his children would receive part of his money ...
drawback
{n.} Disadvantage; obstacle; hindrance. * /The biggest drawback of Bill's plan is the cost involved./
drawer
See: TOP-DRAWER.
drawing card
{n.} The most important figure in a multi-person event; the top entertainer during a show; the best professor or researcher at a university, etc. * /During the ...
dread
See: BURNT CHILD DREADS THE FIRE.
dream of
{v.} To think about seriously; think about with the idea of really doing; consider seriously. - Usually used with a negative. * /I wouldn't dream of wearing shorts to church./ ...
dress a window
See: WINDOW DRESSING.
dress like a million dollars
See: BEST BIB AND TUCKER.
dress up
{v.} 1a. To put on best or special clothes. * /Billy hated being dressed up and took off his best suit as soon as he got home from church./ 1b. To put on a costume ...
dressed fit to kill
See: BEST BIB AND TUCKER.
dressed like a peacock
See: BEST BIB AND TUCKER.
dressing down
{n.}, {informal} A scolding. * /The sergeant gave the soldier a good dressing down because his shoes were not shined./
dribs and drabs
{n. phr.} Portions; small bits. * /John paid Oliver back what he owed him in dribs and drabs./
drift off
{v. phr.} 1. To fall asleep, * /He kept nodding and drifting off to sleep while the lecturer was speaking./ 2. To depart; leave gradually. * /One by one, the sailboats ...
drink down
{v. phr.} To drink in one gulp; swallow entirely. * /Steve was so thirsty that he drank down six glasses of orange juice in rapid succession./
drink in
{v. phr.} To absorb with great interest. * /The tourists stood on the beach drinking in the wonderful Hawaiian sunset./
drink like a fish
{v. phr.} To drink (alcoholic beverages) in great quantities; to be addicted to alcohol. * /John is a nice guy but, unfortunately, he drinks like a fish./
drink up
{v. phr.} To finish drinking; empty one's glass. * /"Drink up that cough syrup," the nurse said, "and never mind the taste,"/
drive
See: LINE DRIVE.
drive a bargain
{v. phr.} 1. To buy or sell at a good price; succeed in a trade or deal. * /Tom's collie is a champion; it should be easy for Tom to drive a bargain when he sells ...
drive a hard bargain
See: DRIVE A BARGAIN.
drive at
{v.} To try or want to say; mean. - Used in the present participle. * /John did not understand what the coach was driving at./ * /He had been talking for half an hour before ...
drive home
{v. phr.} To argue convincingly; make a strong point. * /The doctor's convincing arguments and explanation of his X-ray pictures drove home the point to Max that he needed ...
drive like Jehu
{v. phr.}, {informal} To drive very fast, carelessly or recklessly. * /When Joe is late for work, he drives like Jehu./
drive one ape
,[bananas],[crazy],[mad] or[nuts] {v. phr.}, {informal} To irritate, frustrate, or tickle someone's fancy so badly that they think they are going insane. * /"Stop teasing ...
drive one round the bend
{v. phr.}, {informal} To upset someone so much that they think they are going crazy. * /"Slow down, please," Miss Jones cried. "You are driving me around the bend!"/ ...
drive someone bananas
or[drive someone nuts] or[drive someone ape] {v. phr.}, {slang} {informal} To excite someone to the point that he or she goes out of his or her mind; to drive someone ...
drive to the wall
{v. phr.} To defeat someone completely; to ruin someone. * /Poor Uncle Jack was driven to the wall by his angry creditors when his business failed./ Compare: GO TO THE WALL. ...
drive-in
{adj.}/{n.} A kind of movie theater, fast food restaurant, or church, where the customers, spectators, or worshippers do not leave their automobiles but are served ...
driver
See: BACKSEAT DRIVER.
drop
See: AT THE DROP OF A HAT, BOTTOM DROP OUT, JAW DROP or JAW DROP A MILE.
drop a line
{v. phr.} To write someone a short letter or note. * /Please drop me a line when you get to Paris; I'd like to know that you've arrived safely./
drop back
{v.} To move or step backwards; retreat. * /The soldiers dropped back before the enemy's attack./ * /The quarterback dropped back to pass the football./ Compare: ...
drop by
or[stop by] {v.} 1. or[drop around] To make a short or unplanned visit; go on a call or errand; stop at someone's home. * /Drop by any time you're in town./ * /Mv sister ...
drop by the wayside
See: FALL BY THE WAYSIDE.
drop dead
{v.}, {slang} To go away or be quiet; stop bothering someone. - Usually used as a command, * /"Drop dead!" Bill told his little sister when she kept begging to help him ...
drop in
{v.} To make a short or unplanned visit; pay a call. - Often used with "on". * /We were just sitting down to dinner when Uncle Willie dropped in./ * /The Smiths dropped ...
drop in the bucket
{n. phr.} A relatively small amount; a small part of the whole. * /Our university needs several million dollars for its building renovation project; $50,000 is a mere ...
drop name
{v. phr.} To impress people by mentioning famous names. * /He likes to pretend he's important by dropping a lot of names./
drop off
{v.} 1. To take (someone or something) part of the way you are going. * /Joe asked Mrs. Jones to drop him off at the library on her way downtown./ 2. To go to sleep. * ...
drop out
{v.} To stop attending; quit; stop; leave. * /In the middle of the race, Joe got a blister on his foot and had to drop out./ * /Teenagers who drop out of high ...
dropout
{n.} Someone who did not finish school, high school and college primarily. * /Tim is having a hard time getting a better job as he was a high-school dropout./ * /Jack never ...
drown one's sorrows
or[drown one's troubles] {v. phr.}, {informal} To drink liquor to try to forget something unhappy. * /When his wife was killed in an auto accident, Mr. Green tried to drown ...
drown one's troubles
See: DROWN ONE'S SORROWS.
drown out
{v.} To make so much noise that it is impossible to hear (some other sound). * /The children's shouts drowned out the music./ * /The actor's words were drowned out by ...
drum up
{v.} 1. To get by trying or asking again and again; attract or encourage by continued effort. * /The car dealer tried to drum up business by advertising low prices./ 2. ...
dry
See: CUT AND DRIED, HIGH AND DRY.
dry behind the ears
{adj. phr.}, {informal} Experienced; knowing how to do something. Usually used in the negative. * /John had just started working for the company, and was not dry behind the ...
dry out
{v. phr.} To cure an alcoholic. * /A longtime alcoholic. Uncle Steve is now in the hospital getting dried out./
dry up
{v.} 1. To become dry. * /The reservoir dried up during the four-month drought./ 2. To disappear or vanish as if by evaporating. * /The Senator's influence dried ...
dual highway
See: DIVIDED HIGHWAY.
duck
See: DEAD DUCK, KNEE HIGH TO A GRASSHOPPER or KNEE HIGH TO A DUCK, LAME DUCK, LIKE WATER OFF A DUCK'S BACK.
duck out
{v. phr.} To avoid; escape from something by skillful maneuvering. * /Somehow or other Jack always manages to duck out of any hard work./
duck soup
{n.}, {slang} 1. A task easily accomplished or one that does not require much effort. * /That history test was duck soup./ 2. A person who offers no resistance; a ...
duckling
See: UGLY DUCKLING.
duddy
See: FUDDY-DUDDY.
due
See: GIVE ONE'S DUE, GIVE THE DEVIL HIS DUE, IN DUE COURSE at IN GOOD TIME.
due to
{prep.} Because of; owing to; by reason of. * /His injury was due to his careless use of the shotgun./ * /Joe's application to the University was not accepted due to his ...
dull
See: ALL WORK AND NO PLAY MAKES JACK A DULL BOY.
dumb bunny
{n.}, {slang}, {informal} Any person who is gullible and stupid. * /Jack is a regular dumb bunny./
dumbwaiter
{n.} A small elevator for carrying food, dishes, etc., from one floor to another in hotels, restaurants, or large homes. * /The banquet was delayed because the dumbwaiter ...
dumps
See: DOWN IN THE DUMPS or DOWN IN THE MOUTH.
dust
See: BITE THE DUST, KICK UP A FUSS or KICK UP A DUST, WATCH ONE'S DUST, AFTER THE DUST CLEARS/WHEN THE DUST SETTLES.
dust off
{v.}, {informal} 1. To get ready to use again. * /Four years after he graduated from school, Tom decided to dust off his algebra book./ 2. To throw a baseball pitch ...
Dutch
See: BEAT ALL or BEAT THE DUTCH, GO DUTCH, IN DUTCH.
dutch treat
{n.}, {informal} A meal in a restaurant or an outing at the movies, concert, or theater where each party pays his or her own way. * /"I am willing to accept your ...
duty
See: DO DUTY FOR, DOUBLE DUTY, HEAVY DUTY, OFF DUTY, ON DUTY.
duty bound
{adj. phr.} Forced to act by what you believe is right. * /Abraham Lincoln walked miles once to return a few pennies that he had overcharged a woman because he felt ...
duty calls
{n. phr.} One must attend to one's obligations. * /"I'd love to stay and play more poker," Henry said, "but duty calls and I must get back to the office."/
dwell on
or[dwell upon] {v.} To stay on a subject; not leave something or want to leave; not stop talking or writing about. * /Joe dwelt on his mistake long after the test was ...
dyed-in-the-wool
{adj. phr.} Thoroughly committed; inveterate; unchanging. * /He is a died-in-the-wool Conservative Republican./
dying to
{adj. phr.} Having a great desire to; being extremely eager to. * /Seymour is dying to date Mathilda, but she keeps refusing him./
each and every
{adj. phr.} Every. - Used for emphasis. * /The captain wants each and every man to be here at eight o'clock./ * /The teacher must learn the name of each and every ...
each other
or[one another] {pron.} Each one the other; one the other. * /That man and his wife love each other./ * /Bill and Mary gave one another Christmas presents last year./ * ...
eager beaver
{n. phr.}, {slang} A person who is always eager to work or do anything extra, perhaps to win the favor of his leader or boss. * /Jack likes his teacher and works hard ...
eagle eye
{n.} Sharp vision like that of an eagle; the ability to notice even the tiniest details. * /The new boss keeps an eagle eye on all aspects of our operation./
ear
See: ABOUT ONE'S EARS or AROUND ONE'S EARS, BELIEVE ONE'S EARS, DRY BEHIND THE EARS, FLEA IN ONE'S EAR, GIVE AN EAR TO or LEND AN EAR TO, GO IN ONE EAR AND OUT THE ...
ear to the ground
{n. phr.}, {informal} Attention directed to the way things are going, or seem likely to go, or to the way people feel and think. * /The city manager kept an ear to the ground ...
early
See: BRIGHT AND EARLY.
early bird
{n} An early riser from bed. * /Jane and Tom are real early birds; they get up at 6 A.M. every morning./
early bird catches the worm
or[early bird gets the worm] A person who gets up early in the morning has the best chance of succeeding; if you arrive early or are quicker, you get ahead ...
earn one's keep
{v. phr.} To merit one's salary or keep by performing the labor or chores that are expected of one. * /John earned his keep at the music conservatory by dusting ...
earnest
See: IN EARNEST.
ears burn
{informal} To feel embarrassment or shame at hearing others talk about you. * /Joan overheard the girls criticizing her and it made her ears burn./ * /Joe's ears burned ...
earth
See: COME BACK TO EARTH or COME DOWN TO EARTH, DOWN-TO-EARTH, IN THE WORLD or ON EARTH, MOVE HEAVEN AND EARTH.
ease
See: AT EASE or AT ONE'S EASE, ILL AT EASE.
ease off
or[ease up] {v.} To make or become less nervous; relax; work easier. * /When the boss realized that John had been overworking, he eased off his load./ * /With success and ...
east
See: DOWN EAST.
easy
See: FREE AND EASY, GET OFF EASY, ON EASY STREET, TAKE IT EASY or GO EASY or TAKE THINGS EASY.
easy as pie
See: PIECE OF CAKE.
easy come, easy go
{truncated sent.}, {informal} Something you get quickly and easily may be lost or spent just as easily. * /Grandfather thought Billy should have to work for the ...
easy does it
{informal} Let's do it carefully, without sudden movements and without forcing too hard or too fast; let's try to just hard enough but not too hard. * /"Easy does it," said ...
easy mark
{n.} A foolishly generous person; one from whom it is easy to get money. * /Bill is known to all the neighborhood beggars as an easy mark./ See: SOFT TOUCH.
easy money
{n.}, {informal} Money gained without hard work; money that requires little or no effort. * /The movie rights to a successful play mean easy money to the writer of the play./ * ...
easygoing
{adj.} Amiable in manner; relaxed; not excited. * /Because Al has an easygoing personality, everybody loves him./
eat
See: DOG-EAT-DOG, LIVE HIGH OFF THE HOG or EAT HIGH ON THE HOG, LOOK LIKE THE CAT THAT ATE THE CANARY.
eat (live) high on the hog
or[eat (live) high off the hog] {v. phr.} To eat or live well or elegantly. * /For the first few days after the check arrived, they ate high on the hog./ Compare: IN ...
eat away
{v.} 1. To rot, rust, or destroy. * /Rust was eating away the pipe./ * /Cancer ate away the healthy flesh./ See: EAT OUT(2). 2. To gradually consume. * /The ocean ...
eat away at
{v. phr.} To psychologically gnaw at; to worry someone. * /Fear of the comprehensive examination was eating away at Sam./
eat crow
{v. phr.} To admit you are mistaken or defeated; take back a mistaken statement. * /John had boasted that he would play on the first team; but when the coach did not choose ...
eat dirt
{v. phr.}, {informal} To act humble; accept another's insult or bad treatment. * /Mr. Johnson was so much afraid of losing his job that he would eat dirt whenever the ...
eat humble pie
{v. phr.} To be humbled; to accept insult or shame; admit your error and apologize. * /Tow told a lie about George, and when he was found out, he had to eat humble ...
eat like a bird
{v. phr.} To eat very little; have little appetite. * /Mrs. Benson is on a diet and she eats like a bird./ * /Alice's mother is worried about her; she eats like a ...
eat like a horse
{v. phr.} To eat a lot; eat hungrily. * /The harvesters worked into the evening, and then came in and ate like horses./ Contrast: EAT LIKE A BIRD.
eat one out of house and home
{v. phr.} 1. To eat so much as to cause economic hardship. * /Our teenaged sons are so hungry all the time that they may soon eat us out of house and home./ 2. To overstay ...
eat one's cake and have it too
{v. phr.} To use or spend something and still keep it; have both when you must choose one of two things. Often used in negative sentences. * /Roger can't make up his ...
eat one's heart out
{v. phr.} To grieve long and hopelessly; to become thin and weak from sorrow. * /For months after her husband's death, Joanne simply ate her heart out./ * /We sometimes ...
eat one's words
also[swallow one's words] {v. phr.} To take back something you have said; admit something is not true. * /John had called Harry a coward, but the boys made him eat his ...
eat out
{v.} 1. To eat in a restaurant; eat away from home. * /Fred ate out often even when he wasn't out of town./ 2. To rust, rot, or be destroyed in time. * /Rust had eaten out ...
eat out of one's hand
{v. phr.}, {informal} To trust someone fully; believe or obey someone without question. * /The governor has the reporters eating out of his hand./ * /Helen is so ...
eat up
{v.} 1. To eat all of. * /After hiking all afternoon, they quickly ate up all of the dinner./ 2. To use all of. * /Idle talk had eaten up the hour before they knew it./ 3. ...
eating one
{v. phr.} To cause someone to be angry or ill-humored. * /We can't figure out what's eating Burt, but he hasn't spoken one pleasant word all day./
edge
See: HAVE AN EDGE ON, ON EDGE, SET ONE'S TEETH ON EDGE, TAKE THE EDGE OFF, THE EDGE.
edge away
{v. phr.} To withdraw or retreat gradually. * /Frightened by the growling tiger guarding its catch, the hunter carefully edged away./
edge in
{v.} To move slowly; get in quietly, especially with some difficulty, by force or without a big enough opening. * /People had crowded around the senator, but Don succeeded ...
edge in (on)
{v. phr.} 1. To gradually approach an individual or a group with the intent of taking over or wielding power. * /Jack was edging in on the firm of Smith and Brown and ...
edge on
{adv. phr.} Edgewise; with the narrow side forward. * /The board struck him edge on./
edge out
{v.} To defeat in competition or rivalry; take the place of; force out. * /Harry edged out Tom for a place in Mary's affections./ * /Signal lights on cars have ...
edgeways
See: GET A WORD IN or GET A WORD IN EDGEWISE, also GET A WORD IN EDGEWAYS.
edgewise
See: GET A WORD IN or GET A WORD IN EDGEWAYS.
education
See: HIGHER EDUCATION.
effect
See: IN EFFECT, INTO EFFECT, SOUND EFFECTS, TAKE EFFECT, TO THAT EFFECT, TO THE EFFECT THAT,
effigy
See: HANG IN EFFIGY or BURN IN EFFIGY.
egg
See: BAD EGG, GOOD EGG, KILL THE GOOSE THAT LAID THE GOLDEN EGG, LAY AN EGG, PUT ALL ONE'S EGGS IN ONE BASKET, ROTTEN EGG.
egg on
{v.} To urge on; excite; lead to action. * /Joe's wife egged him on to spend money to show off./ * /The big boys egged on the two little boys to fight./ Compare: PUT UP(6).
either a feast or a famine
See: FEAST OR A FAMINE.
either hide or hair
See: HIDE OR HAIR.
eke out
{v.} 1. To fill out or add a little to; increase a little. * /Mr. Jones eked out a country teacher's small salary by hunting and trapping in the winter./ * /The ...
elbow
See: AT ONE'S ELBOW, ELBOW ROOM, RUB ELBOWS, UP TO THE CHIN IN or UP TO THE ELBOWS IN.
elbow grease
{n.} Exertion; effort; energy. * /"You'll have to use a little more elbow grease to get these windows clean," Mother said to Ed./
elbow one's way into
or[out of] {v. phr.} To force entry into a place by using one's elbows. * /The bus was so crowded that, in order to get off in time, we had to elbow our way to the exit ...
elbow room
{n.} Adequate space to move around or to work in. * /He doesn't require a huge office, but we must at least give him elbow room./
element
See: IN ONE'S ELEMENT, OUT OF ONE'S ELEMENT.
eleventh hour
{adj. phr.} Pertaining to the last minutes; the last opportunity to accomplish a task. * /The editors made several eleventh hour changes in the headlines of the morning ...
else
See: SOMETHING ELSE AGAIN.
emcee
See: MASTER OF CEREMONIES.
en masse
{adv. phr.} As a group; in one big mass or group. - Used after the word it modifies. * /The school turned out en masse to cheer the returning astronaut./
end
See: AT LOOSE ENDS, AT ONE'S WITS' END, BURN THE CANDLE AT BOTH ENDS, GO OFF THE DEEP END, HAIR STAND ON END, HOLD ONE'S END UP or HOLD UP ONE'S END or KEEP ONE'S ...
end for end
{adv. phr.} In a reversed or opposite position (as upside down or backwards); the other way around; over. * /The box turned end for end as it fell, and everything ...
end in itself
{n. phr.} Something wanted for its own sake; a purpose, aim, or goal we want for itself alone and not as a way to something else. * /The miser never spent his ...
end of one's rope
or[end of one's tether] {n. phr.}, {informal} The end of your trying or imagining; the last of your ability, or ideas of how to do more. * /Frank was out of work and ...
end of the road
or[end of the line] {n. phr.} The final result or end (as of a way of action or behavior); the condition that comes when you can do no more. * /He had left a trail of ...
end run
{n.} A football play in which a back tries to run around one end of the opponent's line. * /Smith's end run scored the winning touchdown./
end up
{v.} 1. To come to an end; be ended or finished; stop. * /How does the story end up?/ 2. To finally reach or arrive; land. * /I hope you don't end up in jail./ 3. {informal} ...
end zone
{n.} Either of the marked areas behind the goal line. * /He caught a pass in the end zone for a touchdown./
engage in small talk
{v. phr.} To converse with a stranger or casual acquaintance about matters of no great importance in order to make the time go faster. * /The patients in the doctor's ...
English
See: BODY ENGLISH.
enjoy oneself
{v. phr.} To have a good time; be happy; feel pleasure. * /Mary enjoyed herself at the party./ * /"Enjoy yourselves, children," Mother urged the guests at our party./
enlarge on
or[enlarge upon] or[expand on] or[expand upon] {v.} To talk or write more about; say or explain more completely or at greater length. * /The teacher enlarged on the uses of ...
enough
See: GIVE ONE ENOUGH ROPE, AND HE WILL HANG HIMSELF, KNOW ENOUGH TO COME IN OUT OF THE RAIN, LET WELL ENOUGH ALONE, SURE ENOUGH.
enough is enough
That's enough, let's not have any more; that will do, let's cut it short; that's the limit, let's stop there. * /"I don't mind good clean fun, but enough is enough," ...
enterprise
See: FREE ENTERPRISE.
entry
See: PORT OF ENTRY.
envy
See: GREEN WITH ENVY.
equal to
{adj. phr.} Able to meet, do, or control; able to do something about. * /The situation took quick thinking, but John was equal to it./ * /When a guest upset the coffee ...
equal to the occasion
{adj. phr.} Capable of handling the situation. * /Although he had never before assisted in childbirth, the taxi driver proved equal to the occasion and helped deliver ...
error
See: TRIAL AND ERROR.
evaporate into thin air
See: DISAPPEAR INTO THIN AIR.
eve
See: ON THE EVE OF.
even
See: BREAK EVEN, GET EVEN, ON AN EVEN KEEL.
even so
{adv.} Although that is true; nevertheless; still. * /The fire was out, but even so, the smell of smoke was strong./
evening
See: GOOD EVENING.
event
See: IN ANY CASE or AT ALL EVENTS, IN ANY CASE also IN ANY EVENT or AT ALL EVENTS, IN CASE or IN THE EVENT, IN CASE OF also IN THE EVENT OF.
ever
See: FOREVER AND EVER, HARDLY EVER or SCARCELY EVER.
ever so much
{adv.} Very much; truly. * /I am ever so much in your debt for your kind assistance when I needed it most./
every
See: AT EVERY TURN, EACH AND EVERY.
every inch
{adv. phr.} To the last part, in every way; completely. * /He was every inch a man./ * /Henry looked every inch a soldier./
every cloud has a silver lining
Every trouble has something hopeful that you can see in it, like the bright edge around a dark cloud. - A proverb. * /The doctor told Tommy to cheer up when he had ...
every dog has his day
Everyone will have his chance or turn; everyone is lucky or popular at some time. - A proverb. * /Mary will be able to go to dances like her sister when she grows up. ...
every last
See: EVERY SINGLE.
every last man
also[every man jack] {n. phr.} Every single man; each man without exception. * /I want every last man to be here on time tomorrow morning./ * /Every man jack of you must ...
every man jack
See: EVERY LAST MAN.
every now and then
or[every now and again] or[every so often] or[every once in a while] {adv. phr.} At fairly regular intervals; fairly often; repeatedly. * /John comes to visit me every ...
every other
{adj. phr.} Every second; every alternate. * /The milkman comes every other day./ * /On St. Patrick's Day, it seems as if every other man you meet is wearing a shamrock./ ...
every single
or[every last] {adj. phr.} Every. - Used for emphasis. * /She dropped the box, and when she opened it, every single glass was broken./ * /When she got home she found ...

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