Слова на букву dog-fill (459) Словарь американских идиом
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EN-DE-FR →  Словарь американских идиом →  --- -be m be n-bull bum -come come-does dog-fill fill-get get -hard hard-in a in a-keep keep-long long-nest nest-open open-pull pull-scen sche-so b so b-take take-turn turn-word


Слова на букву dog-fill (459)

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every so often
See: EVERY NOW AND THEN.
every time one turns around
{adv. phr.}, {informal} Very often. * /Mr. Winston must be rich. He buys a new suit every time he turns around./ * /No, Charles - I can't drive you to the park every time ...
every which way
also[any which way] In all directions. * /Bricks and boards were scattered in confusion on the ground every which way, just as they had fallen after the tornado./ Compare ...
everything
See: HOLD IT or HOLD EVERYTHING.
evidence
See: IN EVIDENCE.
example
See: FOR EXAMPLE, MAKE AN EXAMPLE OF.
except for
or {formal}[but for] {prep.} 1. With the exception of; if (a certain person or thing) were left out; omitting. * /Except for John, the whole class passed the test./ 2. ...
exception
See: TAKE EXCEPTION TO.
exception proves the rule
Something unusual that does not follow a rule tests that rule to see if it is true; if there are too many exceptions, the rule is no good. - A proverb. * /Frank is very ...
excuse oneself
{v. phr.} 1. To think of reasons for not being to blame; think yourself not at fault. * /John excused himself for his low grades on the ground that the teacher didn't ...
exert oneself
{v. phr.} To make an effort; try hard; work hard. * /Susan exerted herself all year to earn good marks./ * /Jerry exerted himself to please the new girl./
expand on
or[expand upon] See: ENLARGE ON or ENLARGE UPON.
explain away
{v.} To explain (something) so that it does not seem true or important. * /John explained away his unfinished homework by showing the teacher his broken arm in a cast./ * ...
explain oneself
{v. phr.} 1. To make your meaning plainer; make your first statement clear. * /When we didn't understand Fritz, he went on to explain himself./ 2. To give a good reason ...
explode a bombshell
{v. phr.}, {informal} To say something startling; suggest or show something astonishing or shocking, * /The police exploded a bombshell when they arrested the kindly old ...
express oneself
{v. phr.} To say what you think or feel; put your thoughts or feelings into words by speaking or writing. * /The boy expressed himself well in debate./ * /The mayor expressed ...
extend one's sympathy to
{v. phr.} To offer one's condolences on the occasion of a death or similarly tragic event. * /All of Tom's colleagues extended their sympathy to him when his wife and ...
eye
See: APPLE OF ONE'S EYE, BAT AN EYE or BAT AN EYELASH, BELIEVE ONE'S EYES, CATCH ONE'S EYE, CLEAR-EYED, CLOSE ONE'S EYES or SHUT ONE'S EYES, EYES OPEN, EYE OUT, ...
eye for an eye and a tooth for a tooth
A blow or injury should be given back as hard as each one that is received; every crime or injury should be punished or paid back. * /In ancient times if a man's eye was put ...
eye out
Careful watch or attention; guard. - Used after "keep", "have" or "with". * /Keep an eye out. We're close to Joe's house./ - Usually used with "for". * /Mary has her eye ...
eye shadow
{n. phr.} A cream used to darken the eyelids in order to make the eyes more noticeable. * /Jane's mother told her that girls in the ninth grade shouldn't be using eye ...
eye teeth
See: CUT ONE'S EYE TEETH ON at CUT TEETH(2).
eye to
1. Attention to. - Usually used with "have" or "with". * /Have an eye to spelling in these test papers./ 2. Plan for, purpose of. - Usually used with "have" or "with". * ...
eye-catcher
{n.} Something that strongly attracts the eye. See: CATCH ONE'S EYE. * /That new girl in our class is a real eye-catcher./
eye-catching
See: CATCH ONE'S EYE.
eye-filling
{adj.}, {literary} Attractive to the eye; beautiful; especially grand; splendid; majestic. * /The mountains in the distance were an eye-filling sight./
eye-opener
See: OPEN ONE'S EYES.
eyebrow
See: RAISE EYEBROWS.
eyes are bigger than one's stomach
{informal} You want more food than you can eat. * /Annie took a second big helping of pudding, but her eyes were bigger than her stomach./ * /"Your eyes are bigger than your ...
eyes in the back of one's head
{n. phr.}, {informal} Ability to know what happens when your back is turned. * /Mother must have eyes in the back of her head, because she always knows when I do something ...
eyes open
1. Careful watch or attention; readiness to see. - Usually used with "for". * /Keep your eyes open for a boy in a red cap and sweater./ * /The hunter had his eyes open ...
eyes pop out
{informal} (You) are very much surprised. - Used with a possessive noun or pronoun. * /Mary's eyes popped out when her mother entered her classroom./ * /When Joan found a ...
face
See: BLUE IN THE FACE, CUT OFF ONE'S NOSE TO SPITE ONE'S FACE, FLY IN THE FACE OF, HATCHET FACE, HIDE ONE'S FACE, IN ONE'S FACE, IN THE FACE OF, LONG FACE, ...
face down
{v. phr.} To get the upper hand over someone by behaving forcefully; disconcert someone by the displaying of great self-assurance. * /The night guard faced down the ...
face lift
{n. phr.} 1. A surgical procedure designed to make one's face look younger. * /Aunt Jane, who is in her seventies, had an expensive face lift and now she looks as if ...
face the music
{v. phr.}, {informal} To go through trouble or danger, especially because of something you did; accept your punishment. * /The boy was caught cheating in an ...
face up to
{v. phr.} 1. To bravely confront a person or a challenge; admit. * /Jack doesn't want to face up to the fact that Helen doesn't love him anymore./ * /Jane ...
face value
{n.} 1. The worth or price printed on a stamp, bond, note, piece of paper money, etc. * /The savings bond had a face value of $25./ 2. The seeming worth or truth of ...
face-saver
,[face-saving] See: SAVE FACE.
face-to-face
{adv. phr.} 1. With your face looking toward the face of another person; each facing the other. * /Turning a corner, he found himself face-to-face with a policeman./ * /The ...
faced with
{adj. phr.} Confronted with. * /We were all faced with the many wars that broke out in the wake of the collapse of communism./
fact
See: IN FACT, MATTER-OF-FACT.
facts of life
{n. phr.} 1. The truth which we should know about sex, marriage, and births. * /His father told him the facts of life when he was old enough./ 2. The truths one learns ...
fade back
{v.} To back away from the line before passing in football. * /The quarterback is fading back to pass./ Compare: DROP BACK.
fail
See: WITHOUT FAIL.
fail to do
{v. phr.} To neglect to do something that is expected of one. * /Tom waited for Jane for nearly an hour, but she failed to show up./
fair
See: BID FAIR, PLAY FAIR.
fair and square
{adv. phr.}, {informal} Without cheating; honestly. * /He won the game fair and square./
fair catch
{n.} A catch of a kicked football by a player after he holds up his hand to show that he will not run with the ball. * /He saw that he would not be able to run with the ball, ...
fair play
{n.} Equal and right action (to another person); justice. * /The visiting team did not get fair play in the game./ * /The judges decided against Bob, but he said that ...
fair sex
{n. }, {informal} Women in general; the female sex. * /"Better not use four-letter words in front of a member of the fair sex," Joe said./
fair shake
{n.}, {informal} Honest treatment. * /Joe has always given me a fair shake./
fair-haired boy
{n.}, {informal} A person that gets special favors; favorite; pet. * /If he wins the election by a large majority, he will become his party's fair-haired boy./ * /The local ...
fair-weather friend
{n.} A person who is a friend only when you are successful. * /Everyone knows that John's only a fair-weather friend./
fairy godmother
{n.} 1. A fairy believed to help and take care of a baby as it grows up. 2. A person who helps and does much for another. * /The rich man played fairy godmother to the ...
fairy tale
or[story] {n.} An inaccurate, even false account of something; a result of wishful thinking. * /Jeff said he was going to be promoted soon, but we all suspect that it is ...
faith
See: GOOD FAITH, ON FAITH.
fall
See: BOTTOM DROP OUT or BOTTOM FALL OUT, RIDING FOR A FALL.
fall all over
{v. phr.}, {informal} To show too much love or thanks toward (someone). * /She must love him. Every time you see them, she's falling all over him./ * /When Bob found ...
fall asleep at the switch
{v. phr.} To fail to perform an expected task; be remiss in one's duty. * /The two airplanes wouldn't have collided, if the control tower operator hadn't fallen asleep ...
fall away
{v. phr.} To decline; diminish. * /I was shocked to see how haggard Alan looked; he seems to be falling away to a shadow./
fall back
{v.} To move back; go back. - Usually used with a group as subject. * /The army fell back before their stubborn enemies./ * /The crowd around the hurt boy fell back when ...
fall back on
or[fall back upon] v. 1. To retreat to. * /The enemy made a strong attack, and the soldiers fell back on the fort./ 2. To go for help to; turn to in time of need. * ...
fall behind
{v.} To go slower than others and be far behind them. * /When the campers took a hike in the woods, two boys fell behind and got lost./ * /Frank's lessons were too hard for ...
fall by the wayside
also[drop by the wayside] {v. phr.} To give up or fail before the finish. * /The boys tried to make a 50-mile hike, but most of them fell by the wayside./ * /George, ...
fall down on the job
{v. phr.}, {informal} To fail to work well. * /The boss was disappointed when his workers fell down on the job./
fall due
or[come] or[become due] {v. phr.} To reach the time when a bill or invoice is to be paid. * /Our car payment falls due on the first of every month./
fall flat
{v.}, {informal} To be a failure; fail. * /The party fell flat because of the rain./ * /His joke fell flat because no one understood it./
fall for
{v.}, {slang} 1. To begin to like very much. * /Dick fell for baseball when he was a little boy./ 2. To begin to love (a boy or a girl.) * /Helen was a very pretty girl ...
fall from grace
{v. phr.} To go back to a bad way of behaving; do something bad again. * /The boys behaved well during dinner until they fell from grace by eating their dessert with their ...
fall guy
{n.}, {slang} The "patsy" in an illegal transaction; a sucker; a dupe; the person who takes the punishment others deserve. * /When the Savings and Loan Bank failed, due to ...
fall in
{v.} 1. To go and stand properly in a row like soldiers. * /The captain told his men to fall in./ Contrast: FALL OUT(3). 2. to collapse. * /The explosion caused the walls of ...
fall in for
{v.} To receive; get. * /The boy fell in for some sympathy when he broke his leg./ * /The team manager fell in for most of the blame when his team lost the playoffs./ ...
fall in line
or[fall into line] See: IN LINE, INTO LINE.
fall in love
See: IN LOVE.
fall in with
{v.}, {informal} 1. To meet by accident. * /Mary fell in with some of her friends downtown./ 2. To agree to help with; support. * /I fell in with Jack's plan to play a ...
fall into the habit of
{v. phr.} To develop the custom of doing something. * /Jack has fallen into the bad habit of playing poker for large sums of money every night./
fall off
See: DROP OFF(4).
fall off the wagon
{v. phr.}, {slang}, {alcoholism and drug culture} To return to the consumption of an addictive, such as alcohol or drugs, after a period of abstinence. * /Poor Joe has ...
fall on
or[fall upon] {v.} 1. To go and fight with; attack. * /The robbers fell on him from behind trees./ 2. {formal} To meet (troubles). * /The famous poet fell upon ...
fall out
{v.} 1. To happen. * /As it fell out, the Harpers were able to sell their old car./ Compare: TURN OUT(6). 2. To quarrel; fight; fuss; disagree. * /The thieves fell out ...
fall over backwards
or[fall over oneself] {v. phr.} To do everything you can to please someone; try very hard to satisfy someone. * /The hotel manager fell over backwards to give ...
fall over yourself
See: FALL OVER BACKWARDS.
fall short
{v.} To fail to reach (some aim); not succeed. * /His jump fell three inches short of the world record./ * /The movie fell short of expectations./ Contrast: MEASURE ...
fall through
{v.}, {informal} To fail; be ruined; not happen or be done. * /Jim's plans to go to college fell through at the last moment./ * /Mr. Jones' deal to sell his house ...
fall to
{v.} 1. To begin to work. * /The boys fell to and quickly cut the grass./ Syn.: TURN TO. 2. To begin to fight. * /They took out their swords and fell to./ 3. To begin to ...
fall to pieces
{v. phr.} To disintegrate; collapse. * /After the death of Alexander the Great, his empire started to fall to pieces./
fall wide of the mark
See: WIDE OF THE MARK.
falling-out
{n.} Argument; disagreement; quarrel. * /Mary and Jane had a falling-out about who owned the book./ * /The boys had a falling-out when each said that the other had broken ...
fallout
{n.} 1. Result of nuclear explosion; harmful radioactive particles. * /Some experts consider fallout as dangerous as the bomb itself./ 2. Undesirable aftereffects in ...
false
See: PLAY ONE FALSE, SAIL UNDER FALSE COLORS.
family
See: RUN IN THE BLOOD or RUN IN THE FAMILY, IN A FAMILY WAY.
family tree
{n.} Ancestry. * /My family tree can be traced back to the sixteenth century./
famine
See: FEAST OR A FAMINE.
fan
See: HIT THE FAN.
fan out
{v. phr.} To spread in several directions. * /The main road fans out at the edge of the forest in four different directions./
fan the breeze
{v. phr.} 1. See: SHOOT THE BREEZE. 2. To swing and miss the ball in baseball. * /The batter tried to hit a home run but he fanned the breeze./
fancy doing something
- An expression of surprise. * /Fancy meeting you here in such an unexpected place!/
fancy pants
{n.}, {slang} A man or boy who wears clothes that are too nice or acts like a woman or girl; sissy. * /The first time they saw him in his new band uniform, they yelled "Hey, ...
far
See: AS FAR AS or SO FAR AS, SO FAR also THUS PAR, BY FAR, FEW AND FAR BETWEEN, SO PAR, SO GOOD.
far afield
{adj. phr.} Remote; far from the original starting point. * /When we started to discuss theology. Jack was obviously getting far afield from the subject at hand./
far and away
{adv. phr.} Very much. * /The fish was far and away the biggest ever caught on the lake./ Compare: BY FAR, HEAD AND SHOULDERS(2).
far and near
{n. phr.} Far places and near places; everywhere. * /People came from far and near to hear him speak./
far and wide
{adv. phr.} Everywhere, in all directions. * /The wind blew the papers far and wide./ * /My old school friends are scattered far and wide now./ * /The movie ...
far cry
{n.} Something very different. * /His last statement was a far cry from his first story./ * /The first automobile could run, but it was a far cry from a modern car./
far from it
{adv. phr.} Not even approximately; not really at all. * /"Do you think she spent $100 on that dress?" Jane asked. " Far from it," Sue replied. "It must have cost at least ...
far gone
{adj. phr.} In a critical or extreme state. * /He was so far gone by the time the doctor arrived, that nothing could be done to save his life./
far-out
{adj.} 1. Very far away; distant. * /Scientists are planning rocket trips to the moon and far-out planets./ 2. {informal} Very different from others; queer; odd, ...
farfetched
{adj.} Exaggerated; fantastic. * /Sally told us some farfetched story about having been kidnapped by little green men in a flying saucer./
farm
See: COLLECTIVE FARM.
farm out
{v.} 1. To have another person do (something) for you; send away to be done. * /Our teacher had too many test papers to read, so she farmed out half of them to a friend./ 2. ...
fashion
See: AFTER A FASHION, HIGH FASHION or HIGH STYLE.
fast
See: HARD-AND-FAST, PLAY FAST AND LOOSE.
fast and furious
{adj.} or {adv. phr.} Very fast; with much speed and energy. * /He was mowing the grass at a fast and furious rate./ * /When I last saw her she was driving fast and ...
fast buck
or[quick buck] {slang} Money earned quickly and easily, and sometimes dishonestly. * /You can make a fast buck at the golf course by fishing balls out of the water ...
fast talker
{n.}, {slang}, {informal} A con artist or a swindler, one who is particularly apt to get away with illegitimate transactions because of the clever way he talks. * /I wouldn't ...
fast time
See: DAYLIGHT SAVING TIME.
fasten on
{v. phr.} To attach; tie something to make it secure. * /"Fasten on your life jackets when you get into the life boats," the captain said./
fat
See: CHEW THE FAT.
fat chance
{n. phr.}, {slang} Little or no possibility; almost no chance. * /A high school team would have a fat chance of beating a strong college team./ * /Jane is pretty and ...
fat city
{n.}, {slang} A state of contentment due to wealth and position. * /Bully for the Smiths; they have arrived in Fat City./
fat is in the fire
Something has happened that will cause trouble or make a bad situation worse. * /He found out you took it? Well, the fat's in the fire now./
fat of the land
{n. phr.} The best and richest food, clothes, everything. * /When I'm rich I'll retire and live off the fat of the land./
fate
See: TEMPT FATE or TEMPT THE FATES.
father
See: LIKE FATHER, LIKE SON.
Father Christmas
{n.}, {British} The joyful spirit of Christmas; Santa Claus. * /English children look forward to the visit of Father Christmas./
Father's Day
{n.} The third Sunday in June set aside especially to honor fathers whether living or dead. * /The children gave nice presents to their father on Father's Day./
fault
See: AT FAULT, FIND FAULT, TO A FAULT.
faultfinding
{n.} Recrimination; nagging; criticism. * /All of this constant faultfinding will only to lead to trouble between you and your wife./
favor
See: CURRY FAVOR, IN FAVOR OF.
favorite son
{n.} A man supported by his home state for President. * /At a national convention, states often vote for their favorite sons first; then they change and vote for ...
fear
See: FOR FEAR.
fear and trembling
or[fear and trepidation] {n. phr.} Great fear. * /He came in fear and trembling to tell his father he had a bad report card./
feast one's eyes on
{v. phr.} To look at and enjoy very much. * /He feasted his eyes on the beautiful painting./
feast or a famine
{n. phr.} Plenty or very little; big success or bad failure. * /In this business it's either a feast or a famine./ * /He is very careless with his money, it is always a feast ...
feather
See: BIRDS OF A FEATHER FLOCK TOGETHER, TAR AND FEATHER, FINE FEATHERS DO NOT MAKE FINE BIRDS, FUSS AND FEATHERS, MAKE THE FEATHERS FLY, RUFFLE FEATHERS.
feather in one's cap
{n. phr.} Something to be proud of; an honor. * /It was a feather in his cap to win first prize./ (From the medieval practice of placing a feather in the helmet of ...
feather one's nest
{v. phr.}, {informal} 1. To use for yourself money and power, especially from a public office or job in which you are trusted to help other people. * /The rich man told his ...
fed up
({informal}) also ({slang})[fed to the gills] or[fed to the teeth] {adj. phr.} Having had too much of something; at the end of your patience; disgusted; bored; tired. * /People ...
feed
See: BITE THE HAND THAT FEEDS ONE, CHICKEN FEED, OFF FEED or OFF ONE'S FEED, SPOON FEED.
feel
See: GET THE FEEL OF and HARD FEELING.
feel a draft
{v. phr.}, {slang} To have the sensation that one is not welcome in a place; that one has gotten a cold reception. * /Let's go, Suzie, I feel a draft./
feel for someone
{v. phr.}, {informal} To be able to sympathize with someone's problems. * /I can really feel for you, John, for losing your job./
feel free to do
{v. phr.} To take the liberty to engage in an activity. * /Please feel free to take off your jackets; this is an informal party./
feel in one's bones
or[know in one's bones] {v. phr.} To have an idea or feeling but not know why. * /I feel in my hones that tomorrow will be a sunny day./ * /I know in my bones that God will ...
feel like
{v.}, {informal} To want to do or have. * /I don't feel like running today./ * /I just don't feel like pancakes this morning./
feel like a million
or[feel like a million dollars] {v. phr.}, {informal} To be in the best of health and spirits. * /I feel like a million this morning./ * /He had a headache yesterday but ...
feel like a new man
{v. phr.} To feel healthy, vigorous, and well again after a major physical illness or emotional upheaval. * /Ted felt like a new man after his successful heart bypass ...
feel like two cents
See: TWO CENTS.
feel low
{v. phr.} To be depressed; be in low spirits. * /I don't know what's the matter with Mary, but she says she has been feeling very low all afternoon./
feel no pain
{v. phr.}, {slang} To be drunk. * /After a few drinks, the man felt no pain and began to act foolishly./
feel one's oats
{v. phr.}, {slang} 1. To feel frisky or playful; be eager and excited. * /The horses were feeling their oats./ * /When they first got to camp, the boys were feeling their ...
feel one's way
{v. phr.} To proceed cautiously by trial and error; probe. * /I won't ask her to marry me directly; I will feel my way first./
feel out
{v.} To talk or act carefully with someone and find what he thinks or can do. * /The pupils felt out the principal about a party after the game./ * /John felt out his ...
feel out of place
{v. phr.} To experience the sensation of not belonging in a certain place or company. * /Dave felt out of place among all those chess players as he knows nothing about ...
feel the pinch
{v. phr.} To be short of money; experience monetary difficulties. * /If we are going to have a recession, everybody will feel the pinch./
feel up
{v. phr.}, {vulgar}, {avoidable} To arouse sexually by manual contact. * /You mean to tell me that you've been going out for six months and he hasn't ever tried to feel you ...
feel up to something
{v. phr.}, {informal} To feel adequately knowledgeable, strong, or equipped to handle a given task. * /Do you feel up to jogging a mile a day with me?/ Contrast: ...
feet
See: FOOT.
feet of clay
{n. phr.} A hidden fault or weakness in a person which is discovered or shown. * /The famous general showed he had feet of clay when he began to drink liquor./ * /The ...
feet on the ground
{n. phr.} An understanding of what can be done; sensible ideas. Used with a possessive. * /John has his feet on the ground; he knows he cannot learn everything at ...
fell
See: AT ONE FELL SWOOP.
fellow
See: HAIL-FELLOW-WELL-MET, REGULAR GUY or REGULAR FELLOW.
fellow traveller
{n.} A sympathizer with a political movement who does not officially belong to the political party in question. * /Many Germans after World War II were innocently accused of ...
fence
See: GRASS IS ALWAYS GREENER ON THE OTHER SIDE OF THE FENCE, MEND ONE'S FENCES, ON THE FENCE.
fence in
or[hedge in] or[hem in] {v.} To keep (someone) from doing what he or she would like to do. Usually used in the passive. * /Mary felt fenced in because her father would not ...
fence with
or[spar with] {v.} To talk with (someone) as if you were fighting like a swordsman or boxer; to give skillful answers or arguments against (someone). * /The governor was an ...
fence-sitter
{n.} A person unable to pick between two sides; a person who does not want to choose. * /Daddy says he is a fence-sitter because he doesn't know which man he wants for ...
fence-sitting
{n.} or {adj.} Choosing neither side. * /You have been fence-sitting for too long. It is time you made up your mind./ Contrast: MAKE UP ONE'S MIND, TAKE SIDES.
ferret out
{literary} or[smell out] or[sniff out] {v.} To hunt or drive from hiding; to bring out into the open; search for and find. * /John ferreted out the answer to the question ...
few
See: MAN OF FEW WORDS, NOT A FEW, QUITE A FEW.
few and far between
{adj. phr.} Not many; few and scattered; not often met or found; rare. - Used in the predicate. * /People who will work as hard as Thomas A. Edison are few and far between./ ...
fickle finger of fate
See: ACT OF GOD.
fiddle
See: PLAY SECOND FIDDLE.
fiddle around
See: FOOL AROUND(3).
fiddle with
{v. phr.} To carelessly play with something. * /If Jimmy continues to fiddle with our computer, he is liable to ruin it./
fiddler
See: PAY THE PIPER or PAY THE FIDDLER.
field
See: CENTER FIELD, LEFT FIELD, OUT IN LEFT FIELD, PLAY THE FIELD, RIGHT FIELD.
field goal
{n.} 1. A score in football made by kicking the ball over the bar between the goal posts. * /The Giants were not able to make a touchdown but they kicked two field ...
fifth
See: TAKE THE FIFTH.
fifth column
{n. phr.} A group or organization within a country that works to bring about the country's downfall, usually through acts of espionage and sabotage. * /The Communist party in ...
fifty-fifty(2)
{adj.}, {informal} 1. Divided or shared equally. * /It will be a fifty-fifty arrangement; half the money for me and half for you./ 2. Half for and half against; half good ...
fight against time
See: RACING TO STAND STILL.
fight fire with fire
{v. phr.}, {slightly formal}, {of Biblical origin} To fight back in the same way one was attacked; make a defense similar to the attack. * /The candidate was determined to ...
fight it out
See: SLUG IT OUT.
fight off
{v. phr.} 1. To struggle against someone so as to free oneself; push an attacker back. * /Suzy fought off her two attackers in Central Park with a couple of karate ...
fight shy of
{v. phr.} To avoid; escape from. * /Jack always fights shy of anything that even remotely resembles serious work./
fight tooth and nail
See: TOOTH AND NAIL.
fighting chance
{n. phr.} A chance that necessitates struggle and courage; a slim chance. * /The doctor told the family that Jack had a fighting chance to recover./ * /Our business lost ...
figure in
{v.} 1. {informal} To add to a total; remember to put down in figures. * /We figured in the travel expenses but forgot the cost of meals./ 2. To have a part in; be partly ...
figure on
{v.} 1. To expect and think about while making plans. * /We did not figure on having so many people at the picnic./ * /He figured on going to town the next day./ Syn.: ...
figure out
{v.} 1. To find an answer by thinking about (some problem or difficulty); solve. * /Tom couldn't figure out the last problem on the arithmetic test./ * /Sam couldn't ...
figure up
{v. phr.} To calculate; add up. * /If you can figure up how many phone calls I've made from your home, I will pay you right away./
fill (in) the gap
{v. phr.} To supply a missing piece of information; provide a clue during the course of solving a mystery. * /Sherlock Holmes said, " These fingerprints are bound to ...

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