Слова на букву fill-get (459) Словарь американских идиом
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EN-DE-FR →  Словарь американских идиом →  --- -be m be n-bull bum -come come-does dog-fill fill-get get -hard hard-in a in a-keep keep-long long-nest nest-open open-pull pull-scen sche-so b so b-take take-turn turn-word


Слова на букву fill-get (459)

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fill in
{v.} 1. To write words needed in blanks; put in; fill. * /You should fill in all the blanks on an application for a job./ 2. {informal} To tell what you should know. * /The ...
fill one's shoes
{v. phr.} To take the place of another and do as well; to substitute satisfactorily for. * /When Jack got hurt, the coach had nobody to fill his shoes./ * /Joe hopes to ...
fill out
{v.} 1. To put in what is missing; complete; finish; {especially}, to complete (a printed application blank or other form) by writing the missing facts in the blank spaces; ...
fill the bases
See: LOAD THE BASES.
fill the bill
{v. phr.}, {informal} To be just what is needed; be good enough for something; be just right. * /The boss was worried about hiring a deaf boy, but after he tried Tom out ...
fill up
or[fill it up] or[fill her up] {v. phr.} To fill entirely. (Said by the driver of a car to a gas station attendant). * /When the attendant asked Andrew how much gas he ...
filthy lucre
{n.}, {informal} Money, especially when thought of as bad or shameful. * /When the rich gambler tried to make Sarah marry him, she said, "Keep your filthy lucre - I shall ...
filthy rich
{adj. phr.} Extremely rich but without cultural refinement; nouveau riche. * /"The Murgatroyds are filthy rich," Ted complained. "They are rolling in money but they ...
find
or[get one's bearings] {v. phr.} To know where one is or where one is headed. * /"Without a compass," the sergeant warned the enlisted men, "you will never find your ...
find fault
{v. phr.} To find something wrong; complain; criticize. * /She tries to please him, but he always finds fault./ * /They found fault with every box I made./ ...
find it in one's heart
{v. phr.} To be able or willing because of your nature. * /He could not find it in his heart to tell her about her mother's death./ * /Can you find it in your heart to ...
find one's ---
{v. phr.} To become able to use (some power of the body or mind.) * /In the program for the parents, John was nervous and could not speak at first; then he found his ...
find oneself
{v. phr.} To find out what one is fitted for and succeed in that. * /Mary tried several lines of work, but at last found herself as a teacher./ * /Sometimes young ...
find out
{v.} 1. To learn or discover (something you did not know before.) * /One morning the baby found out for the first time that she could walk./ * /I don't know how this car ...
find out the hard way
See: HARD WAY.
finders keepers
or[finders keepers, losers weepers] {informal} Those who find lost things can keep them. - Used usually by children to claim the right to keep something they have found. * ...
fine feathers do not make fine birds
{literary} A person who wears fine clothes may not be as good as he looks. - A proverb. * /Mary is pretty and she wears pretty clothes, but she is very mean. Fine ...
fine kettle of fish
See: KETTLE OF FISH.
fine-tooth comb
{n. phr.} Great care; careful attention so as not to miss anything. * /The police searched the scene of the crime with a fine-tooth comb for clues./ * /My room is so clean ...
finger
See: BURN ONE'S FINGERS, CROSS ONE'S FINGERS or KEEP ONE'S FINGERS CROSSED, LAY A FINGER ON, LIFT A FINGER, PUT ONE'S FINGER ON also LAY ONE'S FINGER ON, SLIP THROUGH ...
finger in the pie
{n. phr.}, {informal} Something to do with what happens; part interest or responsibility. * /When the girls got up a Christmas party, I felt sure Alice had a finger in the ...
fingertip
See: AT ONE'S FINGERTIPS.
finish up
See: END UP(4).
fire
See: BALL OF FIRE, BETWEEN THE DEVIL AND THE DEEP BLUE SEA or BETWEEN TWO FIRES, BUILD A FIRE UNDER, BURNT CHILD DREADS THE FIRE, CATCH FIRE, DRAW FIRE, FAT'S IN THE ...
firebug
{n.} An arsonist; one who willfully sets fire to property. * /The police caught the firebug just as he was about to set another barn ablaze in the country./
firing squad
{n.} A group of soldiers chosen to shoot a prisoner to death or to fire shots over a grave as a tribute. * /A dictator often sends his enemies before a firing squad./ * ...
first
See: AT FIRST BLUSH, AT FIRST SIGHT, CAST THE FIRST STONE, GET TO FIRST BASE or REACH FIRST BASE, IN THE FIRST PLACE, OF THE FIRST WATER.
first things first
Other things must wait until the most important and necessary things are done. * /Study your lessons before you go out to play. First things first./
first and last
{adv. phr.} Most noticeably; all the time; chiefly. * /He was first and last a school teacher./ * /Steven joined the army because first and last he wanted to help his ...
first and foremost
{adv. phr.} As the most important thing; first. * /First and foremost they needed food./ * /I want you to remember to pay that bill first and foremost./ * /First ...
first base
{n. phr.} 1. The base that must be touched first by a baseball player after batting. * /He got to first base on four balls./ 2. See: GET TO FIRST BASE.
first class
{n.} 1. The first rank; the highest class; the best group. * /The pianist was quite good but he was not in the first class./ 2. The most expensive or comfortable class of ...
first come, first served
{truncated sent.}, {informal} If you arrive first, you will be served first; people will be waited on in the order they come; the person who comes first will have his ...
first cousin
{n.} The child of your aunt or uncle. * /Tom's only first cousin was Ralph, the son of his Uncle John./
first of all
{adv. phr.} Chiefly; primarily; as the first thing. * /After we get to Chicago, we will, first of all, try to find a reliable used car./
first off
{adv. phr.}, {informal} Before anything else; first. * /First off, I want you to mow the lawn./
first stone
See: CAST THE FIRST STONE.
first string(1)
{n.}, {informal} 1. The best group of players on a team; first team; A team. * /Dick loved basketball and practiced hard until he was put on the first string./ 2. The ...
first thing off the bat
{adv. phr.} Immediately; at once. * /He called home from Paris first thing off the bat as he stepped off the plane./
first-class(1)
{adj.} 1. Of the highest class or best kind; excellent; first-rate. * /Jane did a first-class job of repairing the coat./ * /It was a first-class TV program./ Compare: ...
first-class(2)
{adv.} With the best material; in the best or most expensive way. * /When Mr. Van Smith goes anywhere he always travels first-class./ * /"How did you send the package?" ...
first-run
{adj. phr.} Shown for the first time; new. * /The local theater showed only first-run movies./
first-string
{adj.}, {informal} 1. On the starting team or A team. * /He was the first-string quarterback./ 2. Of the best quality; foremost. * /He was the least expensive of the ...
firsthand
{adj.} Fresh; genuine; from the original source. * /John says he got the information firsthand from the president himself./
fish
See: COLD FISH, KETTLE OF FISH, NEITHER FISH NOR FOWL, NOT THE ONLY FISH IN THE SEA, OTHER FISH TO FRY.
fish for
{v.}, {informal} To try to get or to find out (something), by hinting or by a roundabout way to try to lead someone else to give or tell you what you want by hinting. ...
fish for a compliment
{v, phr.} To try to make someone pay a compliment. * /When Jim showed me his new car, I could tell that he was fishing for a compliment./
fish fry
{n.} An outdoor party or picnic at which fish are fried and eaten. * /The guests at the fish fry caught and cooked their own fish./
fish in muddy
or[troubled waters] {v. phr.} To take advantage of a troubled or confusing situation; seek personal advantage. * /With the police disorganized after the collapse of ...
fish or cut bait
{v. phr.}, {informal} 1. Decide what you want to do and stop wasting time; either act now or give someone else a chance or turn. * /Jack couldn't decide whether to go to ...
fish out of water
{n. phr.} A person who is out of his proper place in life; someone who does not fit in. * /Because Ed could not swim, he felt like a fish out of water at the beach./ ...
fish story
{n. phr.} An unlikely or improbable tale. * /Hunters and fishermen often exaggerate their successes by telling fish stories./
fish-and-chips
{n. phr.} Fried fish and french fried potatoes. * /The family went to a drive-in restaurant and had fish-and-chips./
fist
See: HARD-FISTED.
fit
See: BY FITS AND STARTS, GIVE PITS, HAVE A FIT or HAVE FITS, IF THE SHOE FITS, WEAR IT, SEE FIT also THINK FIT, SURVIVAL OF THE FITTEST.
fit as a fiddle
{adj. phr.} In very good health. * /The man was almost 90 years old but fit as a fiddle./ * /Mary rested at home for a few weeks after her operation; then she felt fit as ...
fit for
{v. phr.} To be suited for; be prepared for. * /"What kind of job is Ted fit for?" the social worker asked./
fit in with
{v. phr.} To fall into agreement or accord with. * /His plans to take a vacation in early July fit in perfectly with the university schedule./
fit like a glove
{v. phr.} To fit perfectly. * /Her new dress fits her like a glove./
fit out
or[fit up] {v.} To give things needed; furnish. * /The soldiers were fitted out with guns and clothing./ * /The government fitted out warships and got sailors for them./ * ...
fit the bill
See: FILL THE BILL.
fit to a T
See: TO A T.
fit to be tied(1)
{adj. phr.}, {informal} Very angry or upset. * /She was fit to be tied when she saw the broken glass./
fit to be tied(2)
{adv. phr.}, {substandard} Very hard. - Used for emphasis. * /Uncle Willie was laughing fit to be tied at the surprised look on Mother's face./
five o'clock shadow
{n. phr.} A very short growth of beard on a man's face who did shave in the morning but whose beard is so strong that it is again visible in the afternoon. * /"You have a ...
fix
See: GET A FIX or GIVE SOMEONE A FIX, GET A FIX ON.
fix someone up with
{v. phr.}, {informal} To help another get a date with a woman or man by arranging a meeting for the two. * /Say Joe, can you possibly fix me up with someone this weekend? ...
fix someone's wagon
or[fix someone's little red wagon] {v. phr.}, {informal} 1. (Said to a child as a threat) to administer a spanking. * /Stop that right away or I'll fix your ...
fix up
{v. phr.} 1. To repair. * /The school is having the old gym fixed up./ 2. To arrange. * /I think I can fix it up with the company so that John gets the transfer he ...
fizzle out
{v.}, {informal} 1. To stop burning; die out. * /The fuse fizzled out before exploding the firecracker./ 2. To fail after a good start; end in failure. * /The power mower ...
flag down
{v.}, {informal} To stop by waving a signal flag or as if waving a signal flag. * /The signalman flagged down the freight train./ * /A policeman flagged down the car with ...
flakeball
or[flake] {n.}, {slang}, {drug culture} A disjointed, or "flaky" person, who is forgetful and incoherent, as if under the influence of narcotics. * /Hermione is a regular ...
flame
See: ADD FUEL TO THE FLAME, GO UP IN FLAMES.
flanker back
{n.} A football back who can play far to the outside of his regular place. * /The coach is still looking for a speedy boy to play flanker back./
flare up
{v.} 1. To burn brightly for a short time especially after having died down. * /The fire flared up again and then died./ 2. To become suddenly angry. * /The mayor flared ...
flare-up
{n.} The reoccurrence of an infection or an armed conflict. * /He had a flare-up of his arthritis./ * /There was a bad flare-up of hostilities in some countries./
flash
See: IN A FLASH.
flash card
{n.} A card with numbers or words on it that is used in teaching, a class. * /The teacher used flash cards to drill the class in addition./
flash in the pan
{n. phr.}, {slang} A person or thing that starts out well but does not continue. * /The new quarterback was a flash in the pan./ * /Mary got 100 on the first test in arithmetic ...
flat
See: FALL FLAT, IN NO TIME or IN NOTHING FLAT, LEAVE FLAT.
flat as a pancake
{adj. phr.} Very level; very flat; having no mountains or hills. * /A great part of the American Midwest is as flat as a pancake./
flat broke
See: STONE-BROKE.
flat-footed
{adj.}, {informal} 1. Straightforward; forthright; direct; outright. * /The governor issued a flat-footed denial of the accusation./ * /He came out flat-footed against the ...
flat-out
{adv. phr.}, {informal} 1. Without hiding anything; plainly; openly. * /The student told his teacher flat-out that he was not listening to her./ 2. At top speed; as fast ...
flatfoot
{n.}, {slang}, {derogatory} A policeman. * /"What does Joe do for a living? - He's a flatfoot."/
flatter oneself
To be sure of your own talent or skill; highly confident. * /I flatter myself that I am a better swimmer than he is./
flea in one's ear
{n. phr.}, {informal} An idea or answer that is not welcome; an annoying or surprisingly sharp reply or hint. * /I'll put a flea in his ear if he bothers me once more./
flea market
{n. phr.} A place where antiques, second-hand things, and cheap articles are sold, and especially one in the open air. * /The local antique dealers held a flea market ...
flesh
See: IN PERSON also IN THE FLESH, NEITHER FISH NOR FOWL also NEITHER FISH, FLESH, NOR FOWL, PRESS THE FLESH, THORN IN THE FLESH.
flesh and blood
{n.} 1. A close relative (as a father, daughter, brother); close relatives. Used in the phrase "one's own flesh and blood". * /Such an answer from her - and she's my own ...
flesh out
{v.}, {informal} 1. To add to; make fuller, bigger, or longer. * /The author fleshed out his story by adding more about his war experiences./ 2. also[flesh up] To become ...
flesh up
See: FLESH OUT(2).
flfty-flfty(1)
{adv.}, {informal} Equally; evenly. * /The two boys divided the marbles they won fifty-fifty./ * /When Dick and Sam bought an old car, they divided the cost fifty-fifty./
fling oneself at
See: THROW ONESELF AT.
fling oneself at someone's head
See: THROW ONESELF AT SOMEONE'S HEAD.
flip one's lid
also[flip one's wig] {slang} 1. To lose one's temper. * /When that pushy salesman came back Mom really flipped her lid./ Compare: BLOW A FUSE. 2. To lose your mind; ...
flip out
{v. phr.}, {slang}, {informal} To go insane, to go out of one's mind. * /A is impossible to talk to Joe today - he must have flipped out./
flip-flop(1)
{v.}, {informal} To alternate the positions of; exchange the places of; switch. * /The football coach had one play in which he flip-flopped his left halfback and ...
flip-flop(2)
{n.}, {informal} A complete change; a switch from one thing to an entirely different one. * /John wanted to be a carpenter like his father, but when he saw the ...
flip-flop(3)
{adj. phr.}, {informal} Involving or using a change from one of two places, positions, or alternatives to the other. * /The machine was controlled by a flip-flop switch./ ...
flock
See: BIRDS OF A FEATHER FLOCK TOGETHER.
floor
See: GROUND FLOOR, MOP THE FLOOR WITH, WALK THE FLOOR.
floor one
{v. phr.} To overwhelm; astound; nonplus. * /John's sudden announcement that he would retire floored all of us in the office./
floorwalker
{n.} A section manager in a department store. * /To exchange this pair of shoes, you must first get the floorwalker's approval./
flop
See: FLIP-FLOP.
flower child
{n.}, {slang}, {informal} 1. A young person who believes in nonviolence and carries flowers around to symbolize his peace-loving nature. * /Flower children are supposed ...
flower power
{n.}, {slang} The supposed power of love and nonviolence as intended to be used by members of the anti-culture to change American society. * /The young people were ...
fluff one's lines
See: BLOW ONE'S LINES.
fluff stuff
{n.}, {slang}, {citizen's band radio jargon} Snow. * /We can expect some fluff stuff this afternoon./
flunk out
{v. phr.} To have to withdraw from school or college because of too many failing grades. * /Fred flunked out of college during his junior year./
flush it
{v. phr.}, {slang} 1. To fail (something). * /I really flushed it in my math course./ 2. {interj.}, {used imperatively} Expression registering refusal to believe ...
fly
See: BIRD HAS FLOWN, GO FLY A KITE, MAKE THE FEATHERS FLY, MAKE THE FUR FLY, ON THE FLY, POP FLY, SACRIFICE FLY.
fly at one's throat
{v. phr.} To attack you suddenly with great anger. * /When Tom called Dick a bad name, Dick flew at his throat./
fly ball
{n.} A baseball hit high into the air. * /He hit an easy fly ball to center field./
fly blind
{v. phr.} 1. To fly an airplane by instruments alone. * /In the heavy fog he had to fly blind./ 2. {informal} To do something without understanding what you are doing. * ...
fly by the seat of one's pants
{v. phr.}, {slang} To fly an airplane by feel and instinct rather than with the help of the instruments. * /Many pilots in World War I had to fly by the seat of ...
fly in the face of
or[fly in the teeth of] {v. phr.} To ignore; go against; show disrespect or disregard for. * /You can't fly in the face of good business rules and expect to he successful./ ...
fly in the ointment
{n. phr.}, {informal} An unpleasant part of a pleasant thing; something small that spoils your fun. * /We had a lot of fun at the beach; the only fly in the ointment was ...
fly into a rage
or[temper] {v. phr.} To become very angry. * /By the time we mention the name of her ex-husband, she flies into a rage./
fly off the handle
{v. phr.}, {informal} To become very angry. * /John flew off the handle whenever Mary made a mistake./ * /The children's noise made the man next door fly off the ...
fly the coop
{v. phr.}, {slang} To leave suddenly and secretly; run away. * /The robbers flew the coop before the police arrived./ * /His partner flew the coop with all the money./
fly-by-night(1)
{adj.} Set up to make a lot of money in a hurry, then disappear so people can't find you to complain about poor work, etc.; not trustworthy; not reliable. * /Mrs. Blank ...
fly-by-night(2)
{n.}, {informal} 1. A company that sells many cheap things for a big profit and then disappears. * /A dependable company honors its guarantees, but a fly-by-night ...
flying
See: WITH FLYING COLORS.
flying high
{adj.}, {slang} Very happy; joyful. * /Jack was flying high after his team won the game./ Compare: IN THE CLOUDS, ON TOP OP THE WORLD.
flying saucer
See: U.F.O.
flying start
See: GET OFF TO A FLYING START.
flying tackle
{n.}, {informal} A tackle made by jumping through the air at the person to be tackled. * /Most football coaches don't want their players to make flying tackles./ * /The ...
flying visit
{n. phr.} A visit of very short duration. * /Tom came to New York for only a flying visit. We had hardly eaten lunch when he had to leave./
flying wedge
{n.}, {informal} 1. An offensive formation in football in which players link arms and line up to form a "V" with the ball carrier in the middle. * /The flying wedge ...
foam at the mouth
{v. phr.}, {slang} To be very angry, like a mad dog. * /By the time Uncle Henry had the third flat tire he was really foaming at the mouth./
fob off
{v.}, {informal} 1. To get something false accepted as good or real. * /The peddler fobbed off pieces of glass as diamonds./ Syn.: PALM OFF, PASS OFF. 2. To put aside; ...
fog
See: IN A FOG.
foggy bottom
{n.}, {slang} An area in downtown Washington, D.C. where many offices of the Department of State are located; hence figuratively, the U.S. Department of State. * /The ...
fold up
{v.}, {informal} To collapse; fail. * /The team folded up in the last part of the season./ * /The new restaurant folded up in less than a year./ Compare: FALL APART.
folk
See: WEE FOLK.
follow
See: AS FOLLOWS.
follow in one's footsteps
also[follow in one's tracks] {v. phr.} To follow someone's example; follow someone exactly, * /He followed in his father's footsteps and became a doctor./ Compare: LIKE ...
follow one's heart
{v. phr.} To do what one wishes to do rather than to follow the voice of reason. * /Instead of accepting a lucrative job in his father's business, Jim followed his ...
follow one's nose
{v. phr.}, {informal} 1. To go straight ahead; continue in the same direction. * /Just follow your nose and you'll get there./ 2. To go any way you happen to think of. * ...
follow out
{v. phr.}, {informal} 1. To do fully; finish (what you are told to do.) * /The boy followed out the instructions and made a fine model plane./ Compare: FOLLOW THROUGH. 2. To ...
follow suit
{v. phr.} 1. To play a card of the same color and kind that another player has put down. * /When diamonds were led, I had to follow suit./ 2. To do as someone ...
follow through
{v. phr.} 1. To finish a movement that you have started; continue an action to its natural ending. * /A football passer should follow through after he throws the ...
follow up
{v. phr.}, {informal} 1. To chase or follow closely and without giving up. * /The Indians followed up the wounded buffalo until it fell dead./ 2. Make (one action) more ...
follow-up
{n.} Additional work or research by means of which an earlier undertaking's chances of success are increased. * /I hope you'll be willing to do a bit of follow-up./
follower
See: CAMP FOLLOWER.
fond of
Having a liking for; attracted to by strong liking. * /Alan is fond of candy./ * /Uncle Bill was the children's favorite, and he was fond of them too./
food for thought
{n. phr.} Something to think about or worth thinking about; something that makes you think. * /The teacher told John that she wanted to talk to his father, and that gave ...
fool
See: CHILDREN AND FOOLS SPEAK THE TRUTH, MAKE A FOOL OF.
fool and his money are soon parted
A foolish person soon wastes his money. - A proverb, * /Jimmy spends all his pennies for candy. A fool and his money are soon parted./
fool around
or[mess around] or[play around] or[monkey around] {v.}, {informal} 1. To spend time playing, fooling, or joking instead of being serious or working; waste time. * /If you go ...
fool away
or[fritter away] {v.}, {informal} To waste foolishly. * /Paul failed history because he fooled away his time instead of studying./ * /The man won a lot of money, but he ...
fool's paradise
See: LIVE IN A FOOL'S PARADISE.
foolish
See: PENNY WISE AND POUND FOOLISH.
foolproof
{adj.} So constructed that not even a fool can spoil it; easy. * /This entrance examination is so easy that it is actually foolproof./
foot
See: AT ONE'S FEET, COLD FEET, DEAD ON ONE'S FEET, DRAG ONE'S FEET, FROM HEAD TO FOOT, GET OFF ON THE WRONG FOOT, GET ONE'S FEET WET, HAND AND FOOT, KEEP ONE'S ...
foot in the door
{n. phr.}, {informal} The first step toward getting or doing something; a start toward success; opening. * /Don't let Jane get her foot in the door by joining the club ...
foot the bill
{v. phr.} To cover the expenses of; pay for something. * /The bride's father footed two-thirds of the bill for hix daughter's wedding./ Compare: PICK UP THE TAB.
footed
See: FLAT FOOTED.
footloose and fancy-free
{adj. phr.} Free and free to do what one wants (said of unmarried men). * /Ron is a merry bachelor and seems to enjoy greatly being footloose and fancy-free./
footstep
See: FOLLOW IN ONE'S FOOTSTEPS.
for real(1)
{adj. phr.}, {informal} Not practice or play; earnest, real, serious. * /The war games were over now. This battle was for real./
for sure
or[for certain] {adv. phr.} 1. Without doubt; certainly; surely. * /He couldn't tell for sure from a distance whether it was George or Tom./ * /He didn't know ...
for a fall
See: RIDING FOR A FALL.
for a loop
See: KNOCK FOR A LOOP or THROW FOR A LOOP.
for a loss
See: THROW FOR A LOSS.
for a ride
See: TAKE FOR A RIDE.
for a song
{adv. phr.}, {informal} At a low price; for a bargain price; cheaply. * /He sold the invention for a song and its buyers were the ones who got rich./ * /They bought the ...
for all
1. In spite of; even with, despite. - Used for contrast. * /For all his city ways, he is a country boy at heart./ * /There may be mistakes occasionally, but for all that, it ...
for all one cares
{adv. phr.} In the opinion of one who is not involved or who does not care what happens. * /For all Jane cares, poor Tom might as well drop dead./
for all one is worth
With all of your strength; as hard as you can. * /Roger ran for all he was worth to catch the bus./
for all one knows
{adv. phr.} According to the information one has; probably. * /For all we know, Ron and Beth might have eloped and been married in a French chateau./
for all that
{adv. phr.} In spite of what has been said, alleged, or rumored. * /Well, for all that, we think that she is still the most deserving candidate for Congress./
for all the world
{adv. phr.} 1. Under no circumstances. * /Betty said she wouldn't marry Jake for all the world./ 2. Precisely; exactly. * /It began for all the world like a ...
for as much as
{conj.}, {formal} Because; since. * /For as much as the senator is eighty years old, we feel he should not run for reelection./ Syn.: INASMUCH AS.
for aught
See: FOR ALL(2).
for bear
See: LOADED FOR BEAR.
for better or worse
or[for better or for worse] {adv. phr.} 1. With good or bad effect, depending on how one looks at the matter. * /The historian did justice, for better or worse, to the ...
for broke
See: GO FOR BROKE.
for certain
See: FOR SURE.
for crying out loud
{informal} Used as an exclamation to show that you feel surprised or cross. * /For crying out loud, look who's here!/ * /For crying out loud, that's the third time ...
for days on end
{adv. phr.} For a long time; for many days. * /The American tourists tried to get used to Scottish pronunciation for days on end, but still couldn't understand what ...
for dear life
{adv. phr.} As though afraid of losing your life. * /He was running for dear life toward town./ * /When the horse began to run, she held on for dear life./
for example
or[for instance] {adv. phr.} As an example; as proof; to give an example or illustration. * /Not only rich men become President. For example, Lincoln was born poor./ * ...
for fear
Because of fear. * /He left an hour early for fear of missing his train./ * /She worried for fear that the child would be hurt./
for fear of
{adv. phr.} Because of being afraid of something; on account of being scared. * /Dave refuses to go to Europe for fear of an airplane crash and for fear of a ...
for free
{adj. phr.}, {substandard} Without having to pay; free. * /Hey you guys, look at this balloon! They're for free down at the new store./
for fun
{prep. phr.} As amusement, not seriously, as a joke. * /Let's try to play Beethoven's Emperor Concerto together, you on one piano, and I on another one./ Compare: IN FUN. ...
for good
also[for good and all] Permanently, forever, for always. * /The lost money was gone for good./ * /He hoped that the repairs would stop the leak for good./ * /When ...
for good measure
{adv. phr.} As something more added to what is expected or needed; as an extra. * /He sold me the car at a cheap price and included the radio for good measure./ * /She ...
for granted
See: TAKE FOR GRANTED.
for Heaven's sake!
{adv. phr.} Please. * /"Help me, for Heaven's sake!" the injured man cried./
for hours on end
{adv. phr.} For many hours; for a very long time. * /We have been trying to get this computer going for hours on end, but we need serious professional help./
for instance
See: FOR EXAMPLE.
for it
See: RUN FOR IT.
for keeps
{adv. phr.} 1. For the winner to keep. * /They played marbles for keeps./ 2. {informal} For always; forever, * /He left town for keeps./ Syn.: FOR GOOD. 3. Seriously, not ...
for laughs
{adv. phr.} For pleasure; for fun; as a joke. * /The college boys climbed up into the girls' dorms and stole some of their dresses just for laughs, but they were punished all ...
for love or money
{adv. phr.} For anything; for any price. Used in negative sentences. * /I wouldn't give him my dog for love or money./ Compare: FOR ALL THE WORLD(1).
for no man
See: TIME AND TIDE WAIT FOR NO MAN.
for one
As the first of several possible examples; as one example. * /Manv people do not like certain foods. I for one do not like cabbage./ - Also used with similar words ...
for one thing
{adv. phr.} As one thing of several; as one in a list of things. * /The teacher said, "You get a low mark, for one thing, because you did not do your homework."/ * /The ...
for one's sake
{adv. phr.}, {informal} Used with different possessive nouns to show surprise, crossness, or impatience. * /For heaven's sake, where did you come from?/ * /For ...
for one's money
{prep. phr.} Regarding one's endorsement or support; as far as one is concerned. * /For my money, the best candidate for Congress is Ms. Smith./
for one's part
also[on one's part] {adv. phr.} As far as you are concerned; the way you feel or think. * /I don't know about you, but for my part I don't want to go to that place./ ...
for real(2)
{adv. phr.}, {substandard} Not for practice; really; seriously. * /Let's do our work for real./
for shame
{interj.} Shame on you; you should be ashamed of yourself. - An exclamation no longer in common use, having been largely replaced by " shame on you". * /"For ...
for short
{adv. phr.} So as to make shorter; as an abbreviation or nickname. * /The boy's name was Humperdink, or "Dink" for short./ * /The National Broadcasting Company is called ...
for that matter
{adv. phr.} With regard to that; about that. * /I don't know, and for that matter, I don't care./ * /Alice didn't come, and for that matter, she didn't even telephone./ ...
for the asking
{adv. phr.} By asking; by asking for it; on request. * /John said I could borrow his bike any time. It was mine for the asking./ * /Teacher said her advice was free ...
for the best
{adj.} or {adv. phr.} good or best; not bad as thought; lucky; well, happily. * /Maybe it's for the best that your team lost; now you know how the other boys felt./ ...
for the better
{adj.} or {adv. phr.} With a better result; for something that is better. * /The doctor felt that moving Father to a dry climate would be for the better./ * /The new ...
for the birds
{adj. phr.}, {slang} Not interesting; dull; silly; foolish; stupid. * /I think history is for the birds./ * /I saw that movie. It's for the birds./
for the books
See: ONE FOR THE BOOKS.
for the devil
or[heck] or[the hell of it] {adv. phr.} For no specific reason; just for sport and fun. * /We poured salt into Uncle Tom's coffee, just for the heck of it./ See: DEVIL ...
for the hills
See: HEAD FOR THE HILLS.
for the life of one
{adv.}, {informal} No matter how hard you try. - Used for emphasis with negative statements. * /I can't for the life of me remember his name./
for the moon
See: ASK FOR THE MOON or CRY FOR THE MOON.
for the most part
{adv. phr.} In general; mostly; most of the time; commonly; generally. * /European countries are, for the most part, tired of war./ Syn.: BY AND LARGE, ON THE WHOLE. ...
for the nonce
See: FOR THE TIME BEING.
for the ride
See: ALONG FOR THE RIDE.
for the sake of
or[for one's sake] {adv. phr.} On behalf of; for the benefit of. * /For the sake of truth and freedom, Dr. Sakharov, the Soviet dissident, was willing to be banished from ...
for the time being
also {literary}[for the nonce] {adv. phr.} For now; for a while; temporarily. * /I haven't any note paper, but this envelope will do for the time being./ * /She ...
for the world
See: NOT FOR THE WORLD.
for the worse
{adj. phr.} or {adv. phr.} For something that is worse or not as good, with a worse result. * /He bought a new car but it turned out to be for the worse./ * /The sick ...
for to
{prep. phr.}, {dialect} So that you can; to. * /Simple Simon went a-fishing for to catch a whale./ Syn.: IN ORDER TO.
for you
See: THAT'S --- FOR YOU.
forbid
See: GOD FORBID.
force
See: IN FORCE, JOIN FORCES.
force one's hand
{v. phr.} To make you do something or tell what you will do sooner than planned. * /Ben did not want to tell where he was going, but his friend forced his hand./ * /Mr. Smith ...
force play
or[force-out] {n.} A play in baseball in which a runner is out because he does not run to the next base before the fielder with the ball touches the base. * /Bob was ...
fore
See: TO THE FORE.
foremost
See: FIRST AND FOREMOST.
forest
See: CAN'T SEE THE WOOD FOR THE TREES or CAN'T SEE THE FOREST FOR THE TREES.
forever and ever
{adv. phr.} Forever; always. - Used for emphasis, usually about spiritual things. * /God will live forever and ever./
forever and a day
{adv. phr.}, {informal} For a seemingly endless time; forever; always. Used for emphasis. * /We waited forever and a day to find out who won the contest./ * /They promised ...
forget
See: FORGIVE AND FORGET.
forget oneself
{v. phr.} To do something one should have remembered not to do; do something below one's usual conduct although one knows better; let one's self-control slip. * /He ...
forgive and forget
{v.} To have no bad feelings about what happened in the past. * /After the argument the boys decided to forgive and forget./ Syn.: LET BYGONES BE BYGONES, LIVE ...
fork over
or[fork out] also[fork up] {v.} To pay; pay out. * /He had to fork over fifty dollars to have the car repaired./ Compare: HAND OVER.
fork over a lot of money
{v. phr.} To pay an excessive amount of money often unwillingly. * /"According to my divorce decree," Alan complained, "I have to fork over a lot of money to my ex-wife ...
forked tongue
See: SPEAK WITH A FORKED TONGUE.
form
See: RAN TRUE TO FORM.
fort
See: HOLD THE FORT.
forth
See: AND SO FORTH, BACK AND FORTH, CALL FORTH, HOLD FORTH, SET FORTH.
forty winks
{n. phr.}, {informal} A short period of sleep; a nap. * /When the truck driver felt sleepy, he stopped by the side of the road to catch forty winks./ Compare: SHUT-EYE. ...
forward
See: BACKWARD AND FORWARD, LOOK FORWARD TO, PUT ONE'S BEST FOOT FORWARD.
forward wall
{n.} The line of a football team. * /Princeton 's line outplayed the Rutgers forward wall./
foul ball
{n.} A batted baseball that lands outside the foul line. * /Mickey hit a long foul ball that landed on the roof./
foul line
{n.} 1. Either of two lines separating fair from foul ground in baseball. * /Willie hit the ball just inside the foul line for a double./ 2. A line across the upper ...
foul out
{v.} 1. To make an out in baseball by hitting a foul fly ball that is caught. * /He fouled out to the catcher./ 2. To be forced to leave a basketball game because of getting ...
foul play
{n.} Treachery; a criminal act (such as murder). * /After they discovered the dead body, the police suspected foul play./ * /"She must have met with foul play," the chief ...
foul shot
{n.} A free throw given in basketball to a player who has been fouled. * /Tony was given two foul shots when he was fouled while trying to shoot./ Compare: FIELD GOAL 2, ...
foul up
{v.}, {informal} 1. To make dirty. * /The birds fouled up his newly washed car./ 2. To tangle up. * /He tried to throw a lasso but he got the rope all fouled up./ 3. To ruin ...
foul-up
{n.} (stress on "foul") 1. {informal} A confused situation; confusion; mistake. * /The luncheon was handled with only one or two foul-ups./ 2. {informal} A ...
foundation garment
{n.} A close-fitting garment designed for women to wear underneath their clothes to make them look slim; a piece of woman's underwear. * /Jane wears a foundation ...
four
See: HIT ON ALL FOUR, ON ALL FOURS.
four bits
{n.}, {slang} Fifty cents. * /Tickets to the play are four bits," said Bill./ Compare: TWO BITS.
four corners
{n.} All parts of a place. * /People came from the four corners of the world to see him./ * /He has been to the four corners of the country./ Compare: ALL OVER.
four-eyes
{n.}, {slang} A person who wears glasses. - A rude expression, * /Hey, four-eyes, come over here./
four-leaf clover
{n.} A small green plant with four leaves which many people think means good luck because clover plants usually have three leaves. * /John has a four-leaf clover in his ...
fourth class
{n.} A class of mail that is not sealed and weighs a pound or more, that includes things that are bought and sold and sent in the mail, and printed things that are not second ...
fourth world
{n.}, {informal} The poor nations of the world, as distinguished from the oil-rich nations of the third world. * /Sri Lanka will never join OPEC, since it is a fourth world ...
fourth-class(1)
{adj.} Belonging to the fourth class of mail. * /The package weighed a pound and a half, so it had to be sent by fourth-class mail./
fourth-class(2)
{adv.} By fourth-class mail. * /How did the company mail the package? Fourth-class./
fowl
See: NEITHER FISH NOR FOWL.

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