Слова на букву fill-get (459) Словарь американских идиом
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Слова на букву fill-get (459)

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fox and geese
{n. phr.} A tag game in which the player representing the fox tries to catch one of the players representing geese as they run around the outside of a circle.
fraidy-cat
or[fraid-cat] or[scaredy-cat] or[scared cat] {n.}, {informal} A shy person; someone who is easily frightened. - Usually used by or to children. * /Tom was a fraidy-cat and ...
frame of mind
{n. phr.} One's mental outlook; the state of one's psychological condition, * /There is no use trying to talk to him while he is in such a negative frame of mind./
freak
{n.}, {slang} 1. A good, or well-liked person, the opposite of a square, someone with long hair and who is likely (or known) to be a marijuana smoker or a drug user. Also said ...
freak out(2)
{v. phr.}, {slang} To lose control over one's conscious self due to the influence of hallucinogenic drugs. * /Joe freaked out last night./
freak-out(1)
{n.}, {slang} An act of losing control; a situation that is bizarre or unusual. * /The party last night was a regular freak-out./
free
See: FOR FREE, MAKE FREE, MAKE FREE WITH, OF ONE'S OWN ACCORD or OF ONE'S OWN FREE WILL.
free agent
{n.} A professional player who does not have a contract with a team. * /The Giants signed two free agents who had been released by the Cardinals./
free and easy
{adj.} Not strict; relaxed or careless. * /The teacher was free and easy with his students./ * /He had a free and easy way of acting that attracted many friends./ * ...
free ball
{n.} A ball in football that is in play, that is not in the possession of anyone, that is not a legally thrown forward pass, and that belongs to the first team which can ...
free enterprise
{n. phr.} A system in which private business is controlled by as few government rules as possible. * /The United States is proud of its free enterprise./
free hand
{n.} Great freedom. * /The teacher had a free hand in her classroom./ * /Bob put paint on the fence with a free hand./ Compare: FREE REIN.
free rein
{n.} Freedom to do what you want. * /The king had free rein in his country./ * /Father is strict with the children, but Mother gives them free rein./ Compare: FREE ...
free throw
{n.} A shot at the basket in basketball without interference from opponents. * /Mike scored the winning point on a free throw./ Compare: FIELD GOAL(2), FOUL SHOT. ...
free-for-all
{n.} 1. Unlimited, free access to something everybody wants. * /The Smith's party was a lavish free-for-all; everybody could eat and drink as much as they ...
freeload
{v.} To have oneself supported in terms of food and housing at someone else's expense. * /When are you guys going to stop freeloading and do some work?/
freeze
See: BLOOD RUNS COLD or BLOOD FREEZES.
freeze one's blood
See: BLOOD RUNS COLD.
freeze out
{v.}, {informal} To force out or keep from a share or part in something by unfriendly or dishonest treatment. * /The other boys froze John out of the club./
freeze over
{v.} To become covered with ice. * /The children wanted the lake to freeze over so they could ice-skate./
French fried potato
or[French fry] {n.} A narrow strip of potato fried in deep fat. - Usually used in the plural. * /Sue ordered a hamburger and french fries./
French leave
{n.} The act of slipping away from a place secretly and without saying good-bye to anyone. * /"It's getting late," Rob whispered to Janet. "Let's take French leave and get ...
fresh from
{adj.} Recently returned from; experienced in. * /Tom was fresh from two years in Paris and was very condescending in matters pertaining to cuisine and wines./
friction tape
{n.} Black cloth tape with one sticky side used around electric wires. * /The boy fixed his cracked baseball bat with some friction tape./
Friday
See: GIRL FRIDAY.
friend
See: BOY FRIEND, FAIR-WEATHER FRIEND, GIRL FRIEND, LADY FRIEND, MAKE FRIENDS.
friends with
Friendly to; a friend of. * /Alice found several girls to be friends with on the first day of school./ * /At first I didn't like John, but now I am friends with him./
frightened out of one's wits
See: OUT OF ONE'S WITS.
frightened to death
See: TO DEATH.
fritter away
See: FOOL AWAY.
fro
See: TO AND FRO.
frog
See: BIG FROG IN A SMALL POND, LITTLE FROG IN A BIG POND.
from time to time
{adv. phr.} Not often; not regularly; sometimes; occasionally; at one time and then again at another time. * /Even though the Smiths have moved, we still see them from ...
from --- to ---
1. Used with a repeated word to show that something keeps on. Without ending. * /The world grows wiser from age to age./ * /He goes from day to day without changing his ...
from bad to worse
See: GO FROM BAD TO WORSE.
from grace
See: FALL FROM GRACE.
from hand to hand
{adv. phr.} From one person to another and another. * /The box of candy was passed from hand to hand./ * /Jane brought her engagement ring, and it passed from hand to ...
from hand to mouth
See: LIVE FROM HAND TO MOUTH.
from little acorns
See: GREAT OAKS FROM LITTLE ACORNS GROW.
from Missouri
{adj. phr.}, {slang} Doubtful; suspicious. * /Don't try to fool me. I'm from Missouri./
from mouth to mouth
{adv. phr.} See: BY WORD OF MOUTH.
from pillar to post
{adv. phr.} From one place to another many times. * /Sarah's father changed jobs several times a year, and the family was moved from pillar to post./
from rags to riches
{adv. phr.} Suddenly making a fortune; becoming rich overnight. * /The Smiths went from rags to riches when they unexpectedly won the lottery./
from scratch
{adv. phr.}, {informal} With no help from anything done before; from the beginning; from nothing. * /Dick built a radio from scratch./ * /In sewing class, Mary already ...
from the bottom of one's heart
or[with all one's heart] {adv. phr.} With great feeling; sincerely. * /A mother loves a baby from the bottom of her heart./ * /John thanked his rescuer from the bottom of ...
from the door
See: KEEP THE WOLF FROM THE DOOR.
from the ground up
{adv. phr.} From the beginning; entirely; completely. * /After the fire they had to rebuild their cabin from the ground up./ * /Sam knows about baseball from the ground ...
from the heart
{adv.} Sincerely; honestly. * /John always speaks from the heart./
from the word "go"
{adv. phr.} From start to finish; completely. * /He may look French but he is a New Yorker from the word "go."/
from under
See: OUT FROM UNDER, PULL THE RUG OUT FROM UNDER.
from way back
{adv. phr.} From a previous time; from a long time ago. * /They have known one another from way back when they went to the same elementary school./
front
See: IN FRONT OF.
front and center
{adv.}, {slang} Used as a command to a person to go to someone who wants him. * /Front and center, Smith. The boss wants to see you./
front court
{n.} The half of a basketball court that is a basketball team's offensive zone. * /The guard brought the ball up to the front court./
front office
{n.}, {informal} The group of persons who manage a business; the officers. * /The front office decides how much the workers are paid./
frown upon
{v. phr.} To look with disfavor upon somebody or something. * /Everybody in her family frowns upon her attachment to him./
fruitcake
See: NUTTY AS A FRUITCAKE.
fry
See: OTHER FISH TO FRY, OUT OF THE FRYING PAN INTO THE FIRE, SMALL FRY.
fuck around
{v. phr.}, {vulgar}, {avoidable} 1. To be promiscuous. * /John fucks around with the secretaries./ 2. To play at something without purpose, to mess around. * /He ...
fuck off
{v. phr.}, {vulgar}, {avoidable} 1. Go away! * /Can't you see you're bothering me? Fuck off!/ 2. To be lazy. * /John said "I don't feel like working, so I'll fuck off today."/ ...
fuck up
{v. phr.}, {vulgar}, {avoidable} To make a mess of something or oneself. * /Because he was totally unprepared, he fucked up his exam./ * /He is so fucked up he doesn't ...
fuck-up
{n.}, {vulgar}, {avoidable} A mess; a badly botched situation. * /What a fuck-up the dissolution of the USSR created!/
fuddy-duddy
{n.} A person whose ideas and habits are old-fashioned. * /His students think Professor Jones is an old fuddy-duddy./
fuel
See: ADD FUEL TO THE FLAME.
full
See: HAVE ONE'S HANDS FULL, IN FULL SWING, TO THE FULL.
full blast
{adv.} At full capacity. * /With all the research money at their disposal, the new computer firm was going ahead full blast./
full of oneself
{adj. phr.}, {informal} Interested only in yourself. * /Joe would be a nice boy if he would stop being so full of himself./ Compare: BIG HEAD.
full of beans
{adj. phr.}, {slang} 1. Full of pep; feeling good; in high spirits. * /The football team was full of beans after winning the tournament./ * /The children were full of beans ...
full of it
See: FULL OF THE OLD NICK.
full of prunes
See: FULL OF BEANS(2).
full of the moon
{n. phr.}, {literary} The moon when it is seen as a full circle; the time of a full moon. * /The robbers waited for a dark night when the full of the moon was past./ ...
full of the Old Nick
or[full of the devil] or[full of it] {adj. phr.}, {informal} Always making trouble; naughty; bad. * /That boy is full of the Old Nick./
full tilt
{adv.} At full speed; at high speed. * /He ran full tilt into the door and broke his arm./
full-bodied
{adj.} Mature; of maximum quality. * /The wines from that region in California have a rich, full-bodied flavor./
full-fledged
{adj.} Having everything that is needed to be something; complete. * /A girl needs three years of training to be a full-fledged nurse./ * /The book was a full-fledged ...
fun
See: MAKE FUN OF.
fun and games
{n.}, {slang}, {informal} 1. A party or other entertaining event. 2. Something trivially easy. 3. Petting, or sexual intercourse. 4. (Ironically) An extraordinary ...
fun house
{n.} A place where people see many funny things and have tricks played on them to make them laugh or have a good time. * /The boys and girls had a good time looking at ...
funny bone
{n.} 1. The place at the back of the elbow that hurts like electricity when accidentally hit. * /He hit his funny bone on the arm of the chair./ 2. or {informal}[crazy ...
fur
See: MAKE THE FUR FLY.
furious
See: FAST AND FURIOUS.
fuse
See: BLOW A FUSE.
fuss
See: KICK UP A FUSS.
fuss and feathers
{n.}, {informal} Unnecessary bother and excitement. * /She is full of fuss and feathers this morning./
G.I.
or["government issue"] {n.} An American soldier. * /After the war many GI's were able to get a free education./
gab
See: GIFT OF GAB or GIFT OF THE GAB.
gaff
See: STAND THE GAFF.
gain ground
{v. phr.} 1. To go forward; move ahead. * /The soldiers fought hard and began to gain ground./ 2. To become stronger; make progress; improve. * /The sick man gained ...
gallery
See: PLAY TO THE GALLERY.
gallon
See: TEN-GALLON HAT.
gallows' humor
{n. phr.} Bitter joke(s) that make fun of a very serious matter, e.g. death, imprisonment, etc. * /When the criminal was led to the electric chair on Monday morning, ...
game
See: AHEAD OF THE GAME, LOVE GAME, NAME OF THE GAME, PLAY THE GAME, AT --- STAGE OF THE GAME.
game at which two can play
{n. phr.} A plan, trick, or way of acting that both sides may use. * /Rough football is a game two can play./ * /Politics is a game at which two can play./
game is not worth the candle
{literary} What is being done is not worth the trouble or cost; the gain is not worth the effort. * /I don't want to walk so far on such a hot day. The game is not worth ...
game is up
or {slang}[jig is up] The secret or plan won't work; we are caught or discovered. * /The game is up; the teacher knows who took her keys./ * /The jig's up; the principal knows ...
gang
See: ROAD GANG, SECTION GANG.
gang up on
or[gang up against] {v. phr.}, {informal} To jointly attack someone, either physically or verbally; take sides in a group against an individual. * /The class bully was stronger ...
garbage down
{v. phr.}, {slang} To eat eagerly and at great speed without much regard for manners or social convention. * /The children garbaged down their food./
garden apartment
{n.} An apartment with a garden near it. * /The couple live in a garden apartment./
garment
See: FOUNDATION GARMENT.
gas
See: STEP ON IT or STEP ON THE GAS.
gas up
{v.}, {informal} 1. To fill the gasoline tank of. * /The mechanics gassed up the planes for their long trip./ 2. To fill the tank with gasoline. * /The big truck stopped at ...
gasket
See: BLOW A FUSE or BLOW A GASKET.
gate
See: GET THE BOUNCE or GET THE GATE, GIVE THE BOUNCE or GIVE THE GATE.
gate crasher
See: CRASH THE GATE.
gather
See: ROLLING STONE GATHERS NO MOSS.
gather in
{v.}, {informal} To catch. * /The end gathered in the pass and went over for a touchdown./
gauntlet
See: RUN THE GAUNTLET, THROW DOWN THE GAUNTLET.
gay nineties
{n.} The years between 1890 and 1900; remembered as a happy exciting time. * /Ladies wore large hats in the gay nineties./ * /Picnics were popular in the gay nineties./
gaze
See: CRYSTAL GAZING.
gear
See: HIGH GEAR, SLIP A COG or SLIP A GEAR, THROW OUT OF GEAR.
gee whiz
{interj.}, {informal} Used as an exclamation to show surprise or other strong feeling. Rare in written English. * /Gee whiz! I am late again./
geese
See: FOX AND GEESE.
general
See: IN GENERAL.
generation gap
{n.}, {informal}, {hackneyed phrase} The difference in social values, philosophies, and manners between children and their parents, teachers and relatives which ...
generous to a fault
{adj. phr.} Excessively generous. * /Generous to a fault, my Aunt Elizabeth gave away all her rare books to her old college./
George
See: LET GEORGE DO IT.
get
See: GIVE AS GOOD AS ONE GETS, EARLY BIRD CATCHES THE WORM or EARLY BIRD GETS THE WORM, GO-GETTER, TELL ONE WHERE TO GET OFF.
get credit for
{v. phr.} To be given points of merit, recognition, or praise for labor or intellectual contribution. * /Our firm got a lot of credit for developing parts of the ...
get one's brains fried
{v. phr.}, {slang}, {also used colloquially} 1. To sit in the sun and sunbathe for an excessive length of time. * /Newcomers to Hawaii should be warned not to sit ...
get rattled
{v. phr.} To become confused, overexcited, or nervous. * /The thief got so rattled when he saw the police following him that he drove his car into a ditch./
get the lowdown on
{v. phr.} To receive the full inside information on a person or thing. * /We need to get the lowdown on Peter before we can decide whether or not to hire him./
get the message
or[get the word] {v. phr.}, {slang} To understand clearly what is meant. * /The principal talked to the students about being on time, and most of them got the ...
get through to
{v.} To be understood by; make (someone) understand. * /The little boy could not get through to his housemother./ * /Deaf people sometimes find it hard to get ...
get (all) dolled up
See: DOLL UP.
get (all) the breaks
{v. phr.} To be fortunate; have luck. * /That fellow gets all the breaks! He's been working here only six months, and he's already been promoted to vice president!/ ...
get a black eye
{v. phr.} 1. To receive a dark ring around the eye after being hit by someone's fist or an object. * /In the fistfight Tom got a black eye from Pete./ * /Sue got ...
get a break
{v. phr.} To receive a stroke of luck. * /Bill got a break when he won the lottery./
get a fix
or[give a fix] {v. phr.}, {slang}, {drug culture} To provide (someone) with an injection of narcotics. * /The neighborhood pusher gave Joe a fix./ Contrast: GET A FIX ON.
get a fix on
{v. phr.}, {informal} Receive a reading of a distant object by electronic means, as by radar or sonar. * /Can you get a fix on the submarine?/ Contrast: GET A FIX.
get a grip on
{v. phr.} To take firm control of something. * /If Tim wants to keep his job, he had better get a grip on himself and start working harder./ Contrast: LOSE ONE'S GRIP.
get a head start on
{v. phr.} To receive preliminary help or instruction in a particular subject so that the recipient is in a favorable position compared to his or her peers. * /At ...
get a kick out of
{v. phr.} To be greatly thrilled; derive pleasure from. * /Tom and Many get a kick out of playing four hands on the piano./
get a line on
{v. phr.} To receive special, sometimes even confidential information about something. * /Before Bill accepted his new position, he got a line on how the business was ...
get a load of
{v. phr.}, {slang} 1. To take a good look at; see (something unusual or interesting.) - Often used to show surprise or admiration. * /Get a load of that pretty girl!/ * ...
get a move on
{informal} or {slang}[get a wiggle on] {v. phr.} To hurry up; get going. - Often used as a command. * /Get a move on, or you will be late./
get a raise
{v. phr.} To receive an increment in salary. * /Because of his good work, Ted got a raise after May 1./
get a rise out of
{v. phr.}, {slang} 1. To have some fun with (a person) by making (him) angry; tease. * /The boys get a rise out of Joe by teasing him about his girl friend./ 2. {vulgar}, ...
get a wiggle on
See: GET A MOVE ON.
get a word in
or[get a word in edgewise] also[get a word in edgeways] {v. phr.} To find a chance to say something when others are talking. * /The little boy listened to the older ...
get about
See: GET AROUND(1b).
get across
{v.} 1. To explain clearly, make (something) clear; to make clear the meaning of. * /Mr. Brown is a good coach because he can get across the plays./ Syn.: PUT ACROSS. 2. To ...
get after
{v.}, {informal} 1. To try or try again to make someone do what he is supposed to do. * /Ann's mother gets after her to hang up her clothes./ 2. To scold or make an attack on. ...
get ahead
{v.} 1. {informal} To become successful. * /Mr. Brown was a good lawyer and soon began to get ahead./ * /The person with a good education finds it easier to get ahead./ ...
get along
also[get on] {v.} 1. To go or move away; move on. * /The policeman told the boys on the street corner to get along./ 2. To go forward; make progress; advance, * /John ...
get an earful
{v. phr.}, {informal} To hear more (of usually unwelcome news) than one expects or wishes to hear. * /I asked how Tim and his wife were getting along, and I certainly ...
get around
{v.} 1a. To go to different places; move about. * /Mary's father really gets around; Monday he was in Washington; Wednesday he was in Chicago; and today he is in ...
get around to
{v.} To do (something) after putting it off; find time for. * /Mr. Lee hopes to get around to washing his car next Saturday./
get at
{v.} 1. To reach an understanding of; find out the meaning. * /This book is very hard to get at./ 2. To do harm to. * /The cat is on the chair trying to get at the ...
get away
{v.} 1. To get loose or get free; become free from being held or controlled; succeed in leaving; escape. * /As Jim was trying the bat, it got away from him and hit Tom./ * ...
get away with
{v.}, {informal} To do (something bad or wrong) without being caught or punished. * /Some students get away without doing their homework./ See: GET BY(3).
get away with murder
{v. phr.}, {informal} To do something very bad without being caught or punished. * /John is scolded if he is late with his homework, but Robert gets away with murder./ * ...
get back at
{v.}, {informal} To do something bad to (someone who has done something bad to you) hurt in return. * /John played a joke on Henry, and next day Henry got back at him./ * ...
get back on one's feet
{v. phr.} To once again become financially solvent; regain one's former status and income, or health. * /Max got back on his feet soon after his open heart surgery. Tom's ...
get behind
{v.} 1. To go too slowly: be late; do something too slowly. * /The post office got behind in delivering Christmas mail./ Syn.: FALL BEHIND. Contrast: KEEP UP. 2. ...
get busy
{v. phr.} To accelerate the pace in one's activities. * /We've got to get busy if we want to make the deadline./
get by
{v.}, {informal} 1. To be able to go past; pass. * /The cars moved to the curb so that the fire engine could get by./ 2. To satisfy the need or demand. * /Mary can get ...
get carried away with
See: CARRY AWAY.
get couthed up
{v. phr.}, {slang} To get oneself dressed up neatly and look elegant and presentable. * /What are you getting all couthed up for?/ (This derives from "uncouth" ...
get cracking
{v. phr.}, {slang}, {informal} To hurry up, to start moving fast. (Used mostly as an imperative). * /Come on, you guys, let's get cracking!/ (Let's hurry up!) Compare: GET ...
get down cold
{v. phr.} To memorize perfectly. * /Terry got the text of his speech down cold./
get down off your high horse
See: OFF ONE'S HIGH HORSE.
get down to
{v.}, {informal} To get started on, being on. * /Joe wasted a lot of time before he got down to work./ * /Let's get down to work./ Compare: GET AT(3), GET GOING, GET TO.
get down to brass tacks
also[get down to cases] {v. phr.}, {informal} To begin the most important work or business; get started on the most important things to talk about or know. * /The men ...
get down to business
or[work] {v. phr.} To start being serious; begin to face a problem to be solved, or a task to be accomplished. * /Gentlemen, I'm afraid the party is over and we must get ...
get down to work
See: GET DOWN TO BUSINESS.
get even
{v.}, {informal} 1. To owe nothing. * /Mr. Johnson has a lot of debts, but in a few years he will get even./ 2. To do something bad to pay someone back for something bad; get ...
get going
{v.}, {informal} 1. To excite; stir up and make angry. * /The boys' teasing gets John going./ * /Talking about her freckles gets Mary going./ 2. or {chiefly British}[get ...
get gray hair
or[get gray] {v. phr.}, {informal} To become old or gray from worrying; become very anxious or worried. - Often used with "over". * /"If John doesn't join the team, I won't ...
get his or hers
{v. phr.} To receive one's proper reward or punishment. * /Tim will get his when his wife finds out that he's been seeing other women./
get hitched
{v. phr.} To get married. * /After a long period of dating, Fred and Mary finally got hitched./
get hold of
{v.} 1. To get possession of. * /Little children sometimes get hold of sharp knives and cut themselves./ 2. To find a person so you can speak with him. * /Mr. Thompson ...
get in
{v. phr.} 1. To be admitted. * /Andy wants to go to medical school but his grades aren't good enough for him to get in./ 2. To arrive. * /What time does the plane from ...
get in on
{v. phr.} To be permitted to participate; become privy to; be included. * /This is your chance to get in on a wonderful deal with the new company if you're willing to make ...
get in on the
or[one's act] {v. phr.} To do something because others are engaged in the same act; join others. * /John's business is succeeding so well that both of his brothers want to ...
get in on the ground floor
{v. phr.} To be one of the first members or employees to participate in the growth of a firm, educational institution, etc. * /Elliott got in on the ground ...
get in one's hair
See: IN ONE'S HAIR.
get in one's way
See: IN ONE'S WAY.
get in touch with
See: IN TOUCH.
get in with
{v. phr.} To join up with; begin to associate with; be accepted by. * /He got in with the wrong gang of boys and wound up in jail./ * /She got in with her father's firm and ...
get in wrong
{v. phr.} To incur the anger or dislike of someone; come into disfavor. * /Although he means well, Fred is always getting in wrong with someone at the office./
get into
See: BE INTO SOMETHING.
get into line
{v. phr.} To cooperate; conform. * /The maverick members of the party were advised to get into line unless they wanted to be expelled./ Contrast: OUT OF LINE.
get involved with
See: BE INVOLVED WITH.
get it
{v.} 1. See: CATCH IT. 2. To understand; comprehend; grasp. * /"I can't get it," John said. "Why do you spend so much on clothes."/
get it all together
{v. phr.} 1. To be in full possession and control of one's mental faculties; have a clear purpose well pursued. * /You've sure got it all together, haven't you?/ 2. ...
get it in the neck
See: CATCH IT IN THE NECK.
get lost
{v. phr.}, {slang} Go away! - Used as a command. * /Get lost! I want to study./ * /John told Bert to get lost./ Compare: DROP DEAD.
get mixed up
See: MIXED UP.
get next to
See: BE CLOSE TO.
get off
{v.} 1. To come down from or out of. * /The ladder fell, and Tom couldn't get off the roof./ * /The bus stopped, the door opened, and Father got off./ 2. To take off. ...
get off cheap
{v. phr.} 1. To receive a lesser punishment than one deserves. * /Ted could have been sentenced to fifteen years in prison; he got off cheap by receiving a reduced ...
get off easy
{v. phr.}, {informal} To have only a little trouble; escape something worse. * /The children who missed school to go to the fair got off easy./ * /John got off easy because ...
get off it
See: COME OFF IT.

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