Слова на букву get -hard (459) Словарь американских идиом
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EN-DE-FR →  Словарь американских идиом →  --- -be m be n-bull bum -come come-does dog-fill fill-get get -hard hard-in a in a-keep keep-long long-nest nest-open open-pull pull-scen sche-so b so b-take take-turn turn-word


Слова на букву get -hard (459)

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get off on the wrong foot
{v. phr.} To make a bad start; begin with a mistake. * /Peggy got off on the wrong foot with her new teacher; she chewed gum in class and the teacher didn't like it./ ...
get off one's case
or[back] or[tail] {v. phr.} To stop bothering and constantly checking up on someone; quit hounding one. * /"Get off my case!" he cried angrily. "You're worse than the ...
get off one's back
{v. phr.}, {slang}, {colloquial} To stop criticizing or nagging someone. * /"Get off my back! Can't you see how busy I am?"/
get off one's chest
See: OFF ONE'S CHEST.
get off one's tail
{v. phr.}, {slang} To get busy, to start working. * /OK you guys! Get off your tails and get cracking!/
get off the ground
{v. phr.}, {informal} To make a successful beginning; get a good start; go ahead; make progress. * /Our plans for a party didn't get off the ground because no one could ...
get off the hook
See: OFF THE HOOK.
get off to a flying
or[running start] {v. phr.} To have a promising or successful beginning. * /Ron got off to a flying start in business school when he got nothing but A's./
get on
or[get onto] {v.}, {informal} 1. To speak to (someone) roughly about something he did wrong; blame; scold. * /Mrs. Thompson got on the girls for not keeping their rooms ...
get on in years
See: ALONG IN YEARS.
get on one's good side
{v. phr.} To gain the favor of someone; flatter or please another. * /A clever lobbyist knows how to get on the good side of both the House of Representatives and the ...
get on one's nerves
{v. phr.} To make you nervous. * /John's noisy eating habits get on your nerves./ * /Children get on their parents' nerves by asking so many questions./
get on the ball
See: ON THE BALL.
get on the bandwagon
See: JUMP ON THE BANDWAGON.
get on the good side of
See: ON THE GOOD SIDE OF.
get on the stick
{v. phr.}, {slang}, {informal} To get moving; to stop being idle and to start working vigorously. * /All right, man, let's get on the stick!/ Compare: ON THE BALL, GET OFF ...
get on to one
{v. phr.} To figure someone out; understand what someone else is up to. * /The FBI is on to Jim's secret trading with the enemy./
get one down
{v. phr.}, {informal} 1. To make (someone) unhappy; cause low spirits; cause discouragement. * /Low grades are getting Helen down./ * /Three straight losses got the team ...
get one wrong
{v. phr.} To misinterpret; misunderstand another. * /Don't get me wrong; I didn 't mean to criticize you./
get one's
See: GET WHAT'S COMING TO ONE.
get one's back up
{v. phr.}, {informal} To become or make angry or stubborn. * /Fred got his back up when I said he was wrong./ * /Our criticisms of his actions just got his hack up./
get one's dander up
or[get one's Irish up] {v. phr.} To become or make angry. * /The boy got his dander up because he couldn't go to the store./ * /The children get the teacher's dander up ...
get one's ducks in a row
{v. phr.}, {informal} To get everything ready. * /The scoutmaster told the boys to get their ducks in a row before they went to camp./ * /Mr. Brown got his ducks in a row ...
get one's feet on the ground
See: FEET ON THE GROUND.
get one's feet wet
{v. phr.}, {informal} To begin; do something for the first time. * /The party was at Bill's house and when Ruth and I got there the party had already started. " Jump right in ...
get one's fingers burned
See: BURN ONE'S FINGERS.
get one's foot in the door
See: FOOT IN THE DOOR.
get one's goat
{v. phr.}, {informal} To make a person disgusted or angry. * /The boy's laziness all summer got his father's goat./ * /The slow service at the cafe got Mr. Robinson's ...
get one's hands on
See: LAY ONE'S HANDS ON.
get one's number
or[have one's number] {v. phr.}, {informal} To find out or know what kind of person somebody is. * /The boys soon had the new student's number./ * /The girls got their ...
get one's rear in gear
{v. phr.}, {slang} To hurry up, to get going. * /I'm gonna have to get my rear in gear./
get one's second wind
See: SECOND WIND.
get one's teeth into
or[sink one's teeth into] {v. phr.}, {informal} To have something real or solid to think about; go to work on seriously; struggle with. * /After dinner, John got his teeth ...
get one's tongue
See: CAT GET ONE'S TONGUE.
get out
{v. phr.} 1. Leave or depart. * /"Get out of here!" the teacher shouted angrily to the misbehaving student./ * /"Driver, I want to get out by the opera."/ 2. To publish; ...
get out in the open
See: OUT IN THE OPEN.
get out of
{v. phr.} 1. To be excused from; avoid. * /He got out of jury duty because of his illness./ 2. To gain from; extract from. * /Tom complained that he didn't get anything out ...
get out of hand
See: OUT OF HAND, OUT OF CONTROL.
get out of the way
See: OUT OF THE WAY.
get over
{v.} 1. To finish. * /Tom worked fast to get his lesson over./ 2. To pass over. * /It was hard to get over the muddy road./ 3. To get well from; recover from. * /The man ...
give
See: SILENCE GIVES CONSENT.
give (one) up for
{v. phr.} To abandon hope for someone or something. * /After Larry had not returned to base camp for three nights, his fellow mountain climbers gave him up for ...
give a buzz
See: GIVE A RING.
give a cold shoulder
See: COLD SHOULDER.
give a hand
See: LEND A HAND.
give a hang
or[care a hang] {v. phr.}, {informal} To have any interest or liking; care. - Used also with other words in the place of "hang", such as " damn", "rap", " straw"; usually used ...
give a hard time
{v. phr.}, {informal} 1. To give trouble by what you do or say; complain. * /Jane gave her mother a hard time on the bus by fighting with her sister and screaming./ * /Don't ...
give a pain
{v. phr.}, {slang} To make (you) disgusted; annoy. * /Ann's laziness gives her mother a pain./ * /John's bad manners give his teacher a pain./ Compare: PAIN IN THE NECK.
give a wide berth
{v. phr.} To keep away from; keep a safe distance from. * /Mary gave the barking dog a wide berth./ * /Jack gave a wide berth to the fallen electric wires./ * ...
give an ear to
or[lend an ear to] {v. phr.}, {literary} To listen to. * /Children should give an ear to their parents' advice./ * /The king lent an ear to the complaints of his people./
give as good as one gets
{v. phr.} To be able to give back blow for blow; defend yourself well in a fight or argument. * /The Americans gave as good as they got in the war with the ...
give away
{v.} 1. To give as a present. * /Mrs. Jones has several kittens to give away./ 2. To hand over (a bride) to her husband at the wedding. * /Mr. Jackson gave away his daughter./ ...
give birth to
{v. phr.} 1. To bear live offspring. * /The mother gave birth to twin baby girls./ 2. To bring about; create; occasion. * /Beethoven gave birth to a new kind of symphony./ ...
give chase
{v. phr.} To chase or run after someone or something. * /The dog saw a rabbit and gave chase./ * /The policeman gave chase to the man who robbed the bank./
give color to
or[lend color to] {v. phr.} To make (something) seem true or likely. * /The boy's torn clothes gave color to his story of a fight./ * /The way the man ate lent color to ...
give credence to
{v. phr.} 1. To be willing to believe that something is true. * /Larry gave credence to the rumor that Fred used to be a convict./ * /Give no credence to the rumor that ...
give fits
{v. phr.} {informal} To upset; bother very much. * /Paul's higher grades give John fits./ * /The short guard gave his tall opponent fits./ Compare: GIVE A HARD TIME.
give forth
{v. phr.} To emit; produce. * /When the gong was struck it gave forth a rich, resounding sound./
give free rein to
See: GIVE REIN TO.
give gray hair
{v. phr.}, {informal} To make (someone) anxious, confused, or worried. * /The traffic problem is enough to give a policeman gray hairs./ Compare: GET GRAY HAIR.
give ground
{v. phr.} To go backward under attack; move back; retreat. * /After fighting for a while the troops slowly began to give ground./ * /Although they were outnumbered by ...
give her the gun
See: GIVE IT THE GUN.
give in
{v.} To stop fighting or arguing and do as the other person wants; give someone his own way; stop opposing someone. * /Mother kept inviting Mrs. Smith to stay for ...
give it some thought
{v. phr.} To wait and see; consider something after some time has elapsed. * /"Will you buy my car?" Fred asked. "Let me give it some thought," Jim answered./ Contrast: ...
give it the gun
or[give her the gun] {v. phr.}, {slang} To gun or speed up a motor; make a car, airplane, or something driven by a motor go faster. * /The race driver gave it the gun./ ...
give it to
{v. phr.}, {informal} 1. To give punishment to; beat. * /The crowd yelled for the wrestler to give it to his opponent./ Syn.: LET HAVE IT. 2. To scold. * /Jerry's mother ...
give it to one straight
{v. phr.} To be direct; be frank. * /I asked the doctor to give it to me straight how long I have to live./
give no quarter
{v. phr.} To be ruthless and show no mercy. * /The enemy soldiers gave no quarter and shot all the prisoners./
give notice
{v. phr.} To inform an employer, an employee, a landlord, or a tenant of the termination of a contractual agreement of service or tenancy. * /Max gave notice at the ...
give of oneself
{v. phr.}, {literary} To give your time and effort to help others. * /You should give of yourself sometimes./ * /During World War II, Governor Baldwin gave of himself by ...
give off
{v.} To send out; let out; put forth. * /Rotten eggs give off a bad smell./ * /Burning leaves give off thick smoke./ Syn.: GIVE OUT(2).
give one a dressing down
See: DRESSING DOWN.
give one a free hand
See: FREE HAND.
give one a lift
{v. phr.} 1. To give someone a ride. * /Jack gave me a lift in his new car./ 2. To comfort someone. * /Talking to my doctor yesterday gave me a lift./
give one a piece of one's mind
{v. phr.}, {informal} To scold angrily; say what you really think to (someone). * /Mr. Allen gave the other driver a piece of his mind./ * /The sergeant gave the soldier a ...
give one a ring
also {informal}[give a buzz] To call on the telephone. * /Mrs. Jacobs promised to give her husband a ring in the afternoon./ * /Alice will give her friend a buzz tonight./
give one an inch, and he will take a mile
If you give some people a little or yield anything, they will want more and more; some people are never satisfied. * /I gave Billy a bite of candy and he wanted more and ...
give one enough rope and he will hang himself
{informal} Give a bad person enough time and freedom to do as he pleases, and he may make a bad mistake or get into trouble and be caught. - A proverb. * /Johnny is ...
give one pause
{v. phr.} To astonish someone; cause one to stop and think. * /"Your remark gives me pause," Tom said, when Jane called him an incurable gambler./
give one short shrift
See: SHORT SHRIFT.
give one some of his
or[her own medicine] {v. phr.} To treat someone the way he or she treats others (used in the negative). * /The gangster beat up an innocent old man, so when he resisted ...
give one the eye
{v. phr.}, {slang} 1. To look at, especially with interest and liking. * /A pretty girl went by and all the boys gave her the eye./ 2. To look or stare at, especially in ...
give one the works
See: THE WORKS.
give one's due
{v. phr.} To be fair to (a person), give credit that (a person) deserves. * /The boxer who lost gave the new champion his due./ * /We should give a good worker his due./ ...
give one's right arm for
{v. phr.} To give something of great value; sacrifice. * /During our long hike in the desert, I would have given my right arm for an ice cold drink./
give one's word
{v. phr.} To seriously promise. * /"You gave me your word you would marry me," Mary bitterly complained, "but you broke your word."/
give oneself airs
{v. phr.} To act proud; act vain. * /Mary gave herself airs when she wore her new dress./ * /John gave himself airs when he won first prize./
give oneself away
{v. phr.} To show guilt; show you have done wrong. * /The thief gave himself away by spending so much money./ * /Carl played a joke on Bob and gave himself away by ...
give oneself up
{v.} To stop hiding or running away; surrender. * /The thief gave himself up to the police./ * /Mr. Thompson hit another car, and his wife told him to give himself up./ Compare: ...
give oneself up to
{v. phr.} Not to hold yourself back from; let yourself enjoy. * /Uncle Willie gave himself up to a life of wandering./ * /John came inside from the cold and gave ...
give or take
{v, phr.} To add or subtract. Used with a round number or date to show how approximate it is. * /The house was built in 1900, give or take five years./
give out
{v.} 1. To make known; let it be known; publish. * /Mary gave out that she and Bob were going to be married./ 2. To let escape; give. * /The cowboy gave out a yell./ Syn.: GIVE ...
give pause
{v. phr.} To cause you to stop and think; make you doubt or worry. * /The heavy monthly payments gave Mr. Smith pause in his plans to buy a new car./ * /The bad weather ...
give place to
See: GIVE RISE TO.
give rein to
or[give free rein to] {v. phr.} To remove all restrictions or limitations from someone or something. * /When she wrote her first mystery novel, the talented novelist ...
give rise to
{v. phr.} To be the reason for; cause. * /A branch floating in the water gave rise to Columbus' hopes that land was near./ * /John's black eye gave rise to rumors ...
give signs of
See: SHOW SIGN(S) OF; SHOW NO SIGN OF.
give someone his rights
or[read someone his rights] {v. phr.}, {informal} 1. The act of advising arrested criminals that they have the right to remain silent and that everything they say can be ...
give the glad eye
{v. phr.}, {slang} To give (someone) a welcoming look as if saying " come over here, I want to talk to you." * /I was surprised when Joe gave me the glad eye./
give the air
See: GIVE THE BOUNCE(1).
give the ax
{v. phr.}, {colloquial} 1. Abruptly to finish a relationship. * /She gave me the ax last night./ 2. To fire an employee in a curt manner. * /His boss gave John ...
give the benefit of the doubt
{v. phr.} To believe (a person) is innocent rather than guilty when you are not sure. * /The money was stolen and John was the only boy who had known where it was, but ...
give the bounce
or[give the gate] {v. phr.}, {slang} 1. or[give the air] To stop being a friend or lover to (a person); separate from. * /Mary gave John the bounce after she saw him dating ...
give the creeps
See: THE CREEPS.
give the devil his due
{v. phr.} To be fair, even to someone who is bad; tell the truth about a person even though you don't like him, * /I don't like Mr. Jones, but to give the devil his due, I ...
give the gate
See: GIVE THE BOUNCE.
give the go-by
{v. phr.} To pay no attention to a person; avoid. * /John fell in love with Mary, but she gave him the go-by./ * /The boy raised his hand to answer the question, but the ...
give the high sign
See: HIGH SIGN.
give the hook
See: GIVE THE BOUNCE(2).
give the lie to
{v. phr.}, {literary} 1. To call (someone) a liar. * /The police gave the lie to the man who said that he had been at home during the robbery./ 2. To show (something) to ...
give the sack
See: GIVE THE BOUNCE(2).
give the shirt off one's back
{v. phr.}, {informal} To give away something or everything that you own. * /He'd give you the shirt off his back./
give the show away
{v. phr.} To reveal a plan or information that is supposed to be secret. * /You have read further in the book than I have, but please don't tell me where the treasure ...
give the slip
{v.} To escape from (someone); run away from unexpectedly; sneak away from. * /An Indian was following, but Boone gave him the slip by running down a hill./ * /Some ...
give the willies
{v. phr.} To cause someone to be uncomfortable, fearful, or nervous. * /Sue hates to camp out in a tent; the buzzing of the mosquitoes gives her the willies./
give thought to
{v. phr.} To consider; think about. * /Have you given any thought to the question of how to sell Grandpa's old house?/ Contrast: GIVE IT SOME THOUGHT.
give to understand
{v. phr.}, {informal} 1. To make a person think that something is true but not tell him; suggest; hint. * /Mr. Johnson gave Billy to understand that he would pay him if ...
give up
{v.} 1a. To stop trying to keep; surrender; yield. * /The dog had the ball in his mouth and wouldn't give it up./ * /Jimmy is giving up his job as a newsboy when he goes back ...
give up the ghost
{v. phr.} To die; stop going. * /After a long illness, the old woman gave up the ghost./ * /The motor turned over a few times and gave up the ghost./
give up the ship
{v. phr.} To stop fighting and surrender; stop trying or hoping to do something. * /"Don't give up the ship, John," said his father when John failed a test./
give voice
{v. phr.}, {formal} To tell what you feel or think; especially when you are angry or want to object. - Used with "to". * /The students gave voice to their pleasure over the ...
give way
{v.} 1. To go back; retreat. * /The enemy army is giving way before the cannon fire./ Compare: FALL BACK. 2. To make room, get out of the way. * /The children gave way and ...
give way to
{v. phr.} 1a. To make room for; allow to go or pass; yield to. * /John gave way to the old lady and let her pass./ 1b. To allow to decide. * /Mrs. Rogers gave way lo her ...
give-and-take
{n. phr.} 1. A sharing; giving and receiving back and forth between people; a giving up by people on different sides of part of what each one wants so that they can agree. ...
giveaway
or[dead giveaway] {n.} (stress on "give") 1. An open secret. * /By mid-afternoon, it was a dead giveaway who the new boss would be./ 2. A forced or sacrifice sale at ...
given to
{adj. phr.} Having a tendency to; addicted to. * /Phil is given to telling fantastic tales about his chateau in France./
glad hand
{n.}, {informal} A friendly handshake; a warm greeting. * /Father went to the front door to give Uncle Fred the glad hand when he arrived./ * /The politician went down the ...
glad rags
{n.}, {slang} Clothes worn to parties or on special occasions; best clothes. * /Mrs. Owens put on her glad rags for the party./ Compare: BEST BIB AND TUCKER.
glance
See: AT FIRST GLANCE or AT FIRST SIGHT.
glance off
{v. phr.} To ricochet. * /The bullet glanced off the wall and wounded an innocent bystander./
glass
See: PEOPLE WHO LIVE IN GLASS HOUSES SHOULD NOT THROW STONES, SAFETY GLASS.
glass jaw
{n.}, {slang} The inability of a boxer to get a hard punch on the jaw without being knocked out; a tendency to be knocked out easily. * /He would have been champion ...
glasses
See: LOOK AT THE WORLD THROUGH ROSE-COLORED GLASSES.
globe-trotter
{n.} One who has travelled far and wide. * /Tim and Nancy are regular globe-trotters; there are few countries they haven't been to./
glory
See: IN ONE'S GLORY.
gloss over
{v.} To try to make what is wrong or bad seem right or not important; try to make a thing look easy; pretend about; hide. * /Billy broke a window and Mother tried to gloss it ...
glove
See: FIT LIKE A GLOVE, HAND IN GLOVE or HAND AND GLOVE, HANDLE WITH GLOVES.
glutton for punishment
{n. phr.} A greedy person; someone who wants too much of something, such as food or drink, which will make him sick. * /Fred eats so much red meat that he is a regular ...
go
See: HERE GOES, HERE GOES NOTHING, BEST BIB AND TUCKER or SUNDAY-GO-TO-MEETING CLOTHES, COMINGS AND GOINGS, EASY COME EASY GO, GET GOING, GET-UP-AND-GO, HAVE A GO ...
go from strength to strength
{v. phr.} To move forward, increasing one's fame, power, or fortune in a series of successful achievements. * /Our basketball team has gone from strength to ...
go like clockwork
or[go off like clockwork] {v. phr.}, {informal} To run smoothly and regularly like the workings of a clock; go smoothly and without difficulty; go on time or as planned. ...
go over one's head
{v. phr.} 1. To be too difficult to understand. * /Penny complains that what her math teacher says simply goes over her head./ 2. To do something without the ...
go about
{v.} 1. To be busy with; keep busy at or working on; start working on; do. * /Bobby is going about his homework very seriously tonight./ * /Just go about your ...
go about one's business
{v. phr.} To mind one's own affairs. * /Fred kept bothering me with his questions all day, so I finally told him to go about his business and leave me alone./
go after
{v.} To try to get. * /"First find out what job you want and then go after it," said Jim's father./
go against the grain
See: AGAINST THE GRAIN(2).
go ahead
{v.} To begin to do something; not wait. * /The teacher told the students not to write on the paper yet, but John went ahead and wrote his name./ * /"May I ask you a ...
go all the way with
See: ALL THE WAY.
go along
{v.} 1. To move along; continue. * /Uncle Bill made up the story as he went along./ Compare: GO ON(1). 2. To go together or as company; go for fun. - Often used with ...
go ape
{v. phr.}, {slang} To become highly excited or behave in a crazy way. * /Amy went ape over the hotel and beautiful beaches./ * /The electric door opener malfunctioned and ...
go around
{v.} 1a. To go from one place or person to another. * /Mr. Smith is going around looking for work./ * /Don't go around telling lies like that./ * /Chicken pox is ...
go around in circles
See: IN A CIRCLE.
go astray
{v. phr.} To become lost. * /The letter has obviously gone astray; otherwise it would have been delivered a long time ago./
go at
{v.} 1. To start to fight with; attack. * /The dog and the cat are going at each other again./ 2. To make a beginning on; approach; tackle. * /How are you going to go ...
go at it hammer and tongs
{v. phr.}, {informal} 1. To attack or fight with great strength or energy; have a bad argument. * /Bill slapped George's face and now they're going at it hammer and ...
go AWOL
See: ABSENT WITHOUT LEAVE.
go back on
{v. phr.} 1. To turn against; not be faithful or loyal to. * /Many of the man's friends went back on him when he was sent to prison./ * /The boy's father told him not to go back ...
go off
{v.} 1. To leave; to depart. * /Helen's mother told her not to go off without telling her./ 2a. To be fired; explode. * /The firecracker went off and scared Jack's dog./ ...
go off half-cocked
also[go off at half cock] {v. phr.}, {informal} To act or speak before getting ready; to do something too soon. * /Bill often goes off half cocked./ * /Mr. Jones was ...
go off in a huff
{v. phr.} To depart in anger. * /Marian went off in a huff just because Jeff failed to open the door for her./
go off like clockwork
See: GO LIKE CLOCKWORK.
go off the deep end
or[go overboard] {v. phr.}, {informal} To act excitedly and without careful thinking. * /John has gone off the deep end about owning a motorcycle./ * /Mike warned his ...
go on
{v.} 1a. To continue; not stop. * /After he was hit by the ball, Billy quit pitching and went home, but the game went on./ * /The TV picture began to jump, and it went on like ...
go on record
{v. phr.} To make an official statement as opposed to an informal one; say something officially that may be quoted with the person's name added for reference. * /I want to ...
go on the rocks
See: ON THE ROCKS.
go one's way
{v. phr.} 1. To start again or continue to where you are going. * /The milkman left the milk and went his way./ * /The man stopped and asked me for a match, then went his ...
go or drive to the wall
See: TO THE WALL.
go out
{v. phr.} 1. To pass out of date or style. * /Short skirts are gradually going out./ 2. To stop giving off light or burning. * /Put more wood on the fire or it will go ...
go out for
or[come out for] {v. phr.} To try for a place on (an athletic team.) * /Ten boys went out for track that spring./ * /The coach asked Tom why he didn't come out for ...
go out of business
{v. phr.} To cease functioning as a commercial enterprise. * /The windows of the store are all boarded up because they went out of business./
go out of one's way
{v. phr.} To make an extra effort; do more than usual. * /Jane went out of her way to be nice to the new girl./ * /Don did not like Charles, and he went out of his way to ...
go out the window
{v. phr.}, {informal} To go out of effect; be abandoned. * /During the war, the school dress code went out the window./
go over
{v.} 1. To examine; think about or look at carefully. * /The teacher went over the list and picked John's name./ * /The police went over the gun for fingerprints./ 2. To ...
go over like a lead balloon
{v. phr.}, {informal} To fail to generate a positive response or enthusiasm; to meet with boredom or disapproval. * /The president's suggested budget cuts went over like ...
go over with a fine-tooth comb
See: FINE-TOOTH COMB.
go places
See: GO TO TOWN(2).
go sit on a tack
{v.}, {slang} Shut up and go away; stop bothering. - Usually used as a command and considered rude. * /Henry told Bill to go sit on a tack./ Compare: GO JUMP IN THE ...
go somebody one better
{v. phr.}, {informal} To do something better than (someone else); do more or better than; beat. * /Bill's mother gave the boys in Bill's club hot dogs for ...
go stag
{v. phr.} 1. To go to a dance or party without a companion of the opposite sex. * /When Sally turned him down, Tom decided to go stag to the college prom./ 2. To ...
go steady
{v. phr.} To go on dates with the same person all the time; dale just one person. * /At first Tom and Martha were not serious about each other, but now they are going ...
go straight
{v. phr.}, {slang} To become an honest person; lead an honest life. * /After the man got out of prison, he went straight./ * /Mr. Wright promised to go straight if the judge ...
go the rounds
{v. phr.} To pass or be told from one person to another; spread among many people. * /There is a rumor going the rounds that Mr. Norton will be the new ...
go the whole hog
or[go whole hog] {v. phr.}, {informal} To do something completely or thoroughly; to give all your strength or attention to something. * /When Bob became ...
go through
{v.} 1. To examine or think about carefully; search. * /I went through the papers looking for Jane's letter./ * /Mother went through the drawer looking for the sweater./ ...
go through hell and high water
{v. phr.}, {informal} To go through danger, or trouble. * /John is ready to go through hell and high water to help his chum./ * /The soldiers went through hell and ...
go through the motions
{v. phr.} To pretend to do something by moving or acting as if you were really doing it; do something without really trying hard or caring. * /Jane was angry because she ...
go through with
{v. phr.} To finish; do as planned or agreed; not stop or fail to do. * /The boys don't think Bob will go through with his plans to spend the summer at a camp./ * /Mr. Trent ...
go to
{v.} To be ready to do; start doing something. * /When Jack went to write down the telephone number, he had forgotten it./
go to any length
{v. phr.} To do everything you can. * /Bill will go to any length to keep Dick from getting a date with Mary./ Compare: ALL-OUT.
go to bat for
{v. phr.}, {informal} To help out in trouble or need; give aid to. * /Everybody else thought Billy had broken the window, but Tom went to bat for him./ * /Mary went ...
go to bed with the chickens
{v. phr.}, {informal} To go to bed early at night. * /On the farm John worked hard and went to bed with the chickens./ * /Mr. Barnes goes to bed with the chickens ...
go to great lengths
See: GO TO ANY LENGTH.
go to hell
See: GO TO THE DEVIL.
go to it!
{v. phr.} An expression of encouragement meaning go ahead; proceed. * /"Go to it!" my father cried enthusiastically, when I told him I had decided to become a doctor./
go to one's head
{v. phr.} 1. To make one dizzy. * /Beer and wine go to a person's head./ * /Looking out the high window went to the woman's head./ 2. To make someone too proud; make a ...
go to pieces
{v. phr.} To become very nervous or sick from nervousness; become wild. * /Mrs. Vance went to pieces when she heard her daughter was in the hospital./ * /The man went ...
go to pot
{v. phr.}, {informal} To be ruined; become bad; be destroyed. * /Mr. Jones' health has gone to pot./ * /The motel business went to pot when the new highway was ...
go to prove
See: GO TO SHOW.
go to seed
or[run to seed] {v. phr.} 1. To grow seeds. * /Onions go to seed in hot weather./ 2. To lose skill or strength; stop being good or useful. * /Sometimes a good athlete ...
go to show
or[go to prove] {v. phr.}, {informal} To seem to prove; act or serve to show (a fact); demonstrate. - Often used after "it". * /Our team beat a bigger team, and it just ...
go to the chair
{v. phr.} To be executed in the electric chair. * /After many stays of execution, the criminal finally had to go to the chair./
go to the devil
{v. phr.}, {informal} 1. To go away, mind your own business. - Used as a command; considered rude. * /George told Bob to go to the devil./ * /"Go to the devil!" said Jack, ...
go to the dogs
{v. phr.}, {informal} To go to ruin; to be ruined or destroyed. * /The man went to the dogs after he started drinking./ * /After the death of the owner, the business went ...
go to the trouble
or[take the trouble] {v. phr.} To make trouble or extra work for yourself; bother. * /John told Mr. Brown not to go to the trouble of driving him home./ * /Since your aunt ...
go to town
{v. phr.}, {slang} 1. To do something quickly or with great force or energy; work fast or hard. * /The boys went to town on the old garage, and had it torn down before ...
go to waste
{v. phr.} To be wasted or lost; not used. * /The strawberries went to waste because there was nobody to pick them./ * /Joe's work on the model automobile went to waste ...
go to wrack and ruin
{v. phr.} To fall apart and be ruined; to become useless. * /The barn went to wrack and ruin after the farmer moved./ * /The car will soon go to wrack and ruin standing ...
go together
{v.} 1. To go with the same boy or girl all the time; date just one person. * /Herbert and Thelma go together./ Compare: GO STEADY, GO WITH(2), KEEP COMPANY. 2. To be ...
go under
{v.} 1. To be sunk. * /The ship hit an iceberg and went under./ 2. To fail; be defeated. * /The filling station went under because there were too many others on the ...
go under the hammer
{v. phr.} To be auctioned off. * /Our old family paintings went under the hammer when my father lost his job./
go up
{v.} 1. To go or move higher; rise. * /Many people came to watch the weather balloon go up./ * /The path goes up the hill./ 2. To be able to become heard; become loud or ...
go up in smoke
or[go up in flames] {v. phr.} To burn; be destroyed by fire. 1. * /The house went up in flames./ * /The barn full of hay went up in smoke./ 2. Disappear; fail; ...
go up in the air
{v. phr.} To become angry; lose one's temper. * /Herb is so irritable these days that he goes up in the air for no reason at all./
go with
{v.} 1. To match; to look good with. * /A yellow blouse goes with her blonde hair./ * /The woman bought a purse to go with her new shoes./ 2. To go out in the company of. * ...
go without
See: DO WITHOUT.
go without saying
{v. phr.} To be too plain to need talking about; not be necessary to say or mention. * /It goes without saying that children should not be given knives to play with./ * ...
go wrong
{v. phr.} 1. To fail; go out of order. * /Something went wrong with our car and we stalled on the road./ 2. To sink into an immoral or criminal existence. * /In a large ...
go-between
{n.} An intermediary. * /They expect Mr. Smith to act as a go-between in the dispute between management and labor./
go-by
See: GIVE THE GO-BY.
go-getter
{n.} A person who works hard to become successful; an active, ambitious person who usually gets what he wants. * /The governor of the state has always been a ...
go-go
{adj.}, {slang}, {informal} 1. Vigorous youthful, unusually active. * /Joe is a go-go kind of guy./ 2. Of a discotheque or the music or dances performed there. 3a. ...
goal
See: FIELD GOAL.
goal line
{n.} A line that marks the goal in a game (as football.) * /The fullback went over the goal line from five yards out./
goal line stand
{n.} A strong defensive effort right in front of the goal line. * /A goal line stand by the home team held the visitors on the two-yard line./
goat
See: GET ONE'S GOAT.
God
See: IN THE LAP OP THE GODS also ON THE KNEES OP THE GODS, MY GOD or MY GOODNESS, WOULD THAT or WOULD GOD.
God forbid
{interj.} May God prevent (something from happening); I hope that will not happen or is not true. * /Someone told the worried mother that her son might have ...
God knows
or[goodness knows] or[heaven knows] {informal} 1. Maybe God knows but I don't know and no one else knows. - Often used with " only". * /Do you know where Susan is? God ...
God tempers the wind to the shorn lamb
{literary} A person who is already helpless will not have more trouble; you will not have more trouble than you can bear. * /After Mr. Smith lost his job, the Smith's ...
Godfrey
See: GREAT GODFREY.
Godmother
See: FAIRY GODMOTHER.
going and coming
See: COMING AND GOING.
going for one
{adj. phr.} Working to help; in one's favor. * /The young woman surely will get the job; she has everything going for her./
going on
{adv. phr.} Almost; nearly. * /Joe is going on six years old./ * /It is going on six o'clock./
going through changes
{v. phr.}, {slang}, {informal} To be in trouble, to have difficulties, to be trapped in unfavorable circumstances. * /"What's the matter with Joe?" - "He's going ...
going to
Can be expected to; planning to. - Used after "is" (or "was", etc.), with an infinitive, in the same way "will" is used, to show future. * /Some day that big tree is going to ...
gold
See: HEART OF GOLD.
golden
See: KILL THE GOOSE THAT LAID THE GOLDEN EGG.
goldfish bowl
{n.}, {slang}, {informal} 1. A situation in which it is not possible to keep things secret for any length of time. * /Washington Society is a goldfish bowl./ 2. An ...
golf widow
{n.}, {informal} A woman whose husband is often away from home playing golf. * /Mrs. Thompson didn't like being a golf widow./
gone goose
also[gone gosling] {n.}, {slang} A person for whom there is no hope. * /Herbert's grades have been so low that he is a gone goose for the year./ * /The man was a gone ...
gone with the wind
{adj. phr.} Gone forever; past; vanished. * /All the Indians who used to live here are gone with the wind./ * /Joe knew that his chance to get an "A" was gone with the wind ...
good
See: AS GOOD AS, AS GOOD AS ONE GETS, BUT GOOD, DO ONE GOOD, FOR GOOD, FOR GOOD MEASURE, GET THE GOODS ON, HOLD GOOD, IN GOOD, IN GOOD FAITH, IN GOOD TIME, IN ONE'S ...
good buddy
{n.}, {slang}, {citizen's hand radio jargon} Salutation used by truckers and automobile drivers who have CB radios. * /What's the Smokey situation, good buddy?/
good and ---
{adv.}, {informal} Very; completely. * /John's father was good and mad when John came home late./ * /Jack knew good and well that Tom had thrown the snowball at him./ * /I ...
good as
See: AS GOOD AS.
good as one's promise
See: AS GOOD AS ONE'S WORD.
good as one's word
See: AS GOOD AS ONE'S WORD.
good command
See: HAVE A GOOD COMMAND OF.
good day
{interj.} Hello or goodbye. - Used as a formal greeting or salute when you meet or leave someone during the day. * /Miss Rogers said, "Good day!" when she met her friend ...
good deal
or[great deal] {n.}, {informal} A large amount; much. - Used with "a". * /Mrs. Walker's long illness cost her a good deal./ * /George spends a great deal of his time ...
good egg
{slang} or {informal}[good scout] {n. phr.} A friendly, kind or good-natured person, a nice fellow. * /Tommy is such a good egg that everybody wants to be his friend./ ...
good evening
{interj.} Hello or goodbye. - Used as a formal greeting or salute when you meet or leave someone in the evening. * /When the TV program began, an announcer appeared ...
good faith
{n.} 1. Belief in another person's honesty; trust. * /Uncle Dick let me have the keys to his candy store to show his good faith./ - Often used in the phrase " in good ...
good for
or[hurrah for] {adj. phr.} Used with a name or pronoun to praise someone. * /Good for George! He won the 100-yard dash./ * /You got 100 on the test? Hurrah for you./
good grief!
{interj.}, {informal} Wow! Indication of surprise, good or bad. * /"Good grief," Joe cried out loud. "Is this all you will pay me for my hard work?"/ * /What a figure ...
good head on one's shoulders
{n. phr.} Good sense; good judgment. * /Jack has a good head on his shoulders; he never drives too fast./ * /Alice is a girl with a good head on her shoulders, she always ...
good many
or[great many] {n.} or {adj.} A large number (of); very many. Used with "a". * /We found some fall flowers, but the frost had already killed a good many./ * /A great many ...
good nature
{n.} Readiness to please others and to be pleased. Cheerfulness, pleasantness. * /Everybody likes Mr. Crowe because of his good nature./ * /Miss Reynolds was remembered by ...
good night
{interj.} 1. Used as a polite phrase when you leave someone at night. * /"Good night!" said Bob as he left Dick's house after the party. "I'll see you in the morning."/ ...
good riddance
{n.} A loss that you are glad about. Often used as an exclamation, and in the sentence "good riddance to bad rubbish". To show that you are glad that something or somebody has ...
good scout
See: GOOD EGG.
good show!
{adj. phr.} Excellent; terrific; wonderful. * /"Good show, boys!" the coach cried, when our team won the game./
good-for-nothing
{adj. phr.} Worthless. * /While Janice works hard each day, her good-for-nothing husband hangs around in the bars./

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