Слова на букву get -hard (459) Словарь американских идиом
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EN-DE-FR →  Словарь американских идиом →  --- -be m be n-bull bum -come come-does dog-fill fill-get get -hard hard-in a in a-keep keep-long long-nest nest-open open-pull pull-scen sche-so b so b-take take-turn turn-word


Слова на букву get -hard (459)

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goodness
See: HONEST-TO-GOODNESS, MY GOD or MY GOODNESS.
goodness gracious
{interj.}, {slightly archaic} Exclamation of surprise and a certain degree of disapproval. * /"Can my boyfriend stay overnight, Dad?" Melanie asked. " Goodness ...
goodness knows
See: GOD KNOWS.
goods
See: DELIVER THE GOODS, CONSUMER GOODS.
goof off
{v.}, {slang} To loaf or be lazy; not want to work or be serious; fool around. * /Tow didn't get promoted because he goofed off all the time and never did his homework./ * /If ...
goose
See: COOK ONE'S GOOSE, FOX AND GEESE, KILL THE GOOSE THAT LAID THE GOLDEN EGG, GONE GOOSE.
goose bumps
or[goose pimples] {n. plural}, {informal} Small bumps that come on a person's skin when he gets cold or afraid. * /Nancy gets goose bumps when she sees a snake./ * ...
gopher ball
{n.}, {slang} A baseball pitch that is hit for a home run. * /The pitcher's only weakness this year is the gopher ball./
gosling
See: GONE GOOSE also GONE GOSLING.
gourd
See: SAW WOOD or SAW GOURDS.
gown
See: TOWN AND GOWN.
grab bag
{n.} 1. A bag from which surprise packages are chosen; a bag in which there are many unknown things. * /The woman paid a quarter for a chance at the grab bag./ * ...
grab off
{v.}, {informal} To take quickly; take or grab before anybody else can; choose for yourself. * /The people who got to the show first grabbed off the best seats./ * /The ...
grabs
See: UP FOR GRABS.
grace
See: FALL FROM GRACE, IN ONE'S BAD GRACES, IN ONE'S GOOD GRACES, WITH BAD GRACE, WITH GOOD GRACE.
grace period
or[period of grace] {n.} The time or extra time allowed in which to do something. * /Most insurance companies have a grace period of one month for payments./ * /The teacher ...
grade
See: MAKE THE GRADE.
grain
See: AGAINST THE GRAIN, TAKE WITH A GRAIN OF SALT.
grand slam
{n.} A home run hit when there are three men on the bases. * /Tony's grand slam won the game for the Yankees, 4-0./
grandstand
{v.}, {slang}, {informal} To show off, to perform histrionics needlessly. * /Stop grandstanding and get down to honest work!/
grandstander
{n.}, {slang}, {informal} A showoff, a person who likes to engage in histrionics. * /Many people think that Evel Knievel is a grandstander./
granted
See: TAKE FOR GRANTED.
grasp at straws
or[clutch at straws] {v. phr.} To depend on something that is useless or unable to help in a time of trouble or danger; try something with little hope of succeeding. * ...
grass
See: LET GRASS GROW UNDER ONE'S FEET, SNAKE IN THE GRASS.
grass is always greener on the other side of the fence
or[grass is always greener on the other side of the hill] We are often not satisfied and want to be somewhere else; a place that is far away or different seems better ...
grasshopper
See: KNEE-HIGH TO A GRASSHOPPER
grave
See: ONE FOOT IN THE GRAVE, TURN IN ONE'S GRAVE or TURN OVER IN ONE'S GRAVE.
graveyard shift
{n. phr.} The work period lasting from sundown to sunup, when one has to work in the dark or by artificial light. * /"Why are you always so sleepy in class?" Professor ...
gravy
See: PAN GRAVY.
gravy train
{n.}, {slang}, {informal} The kind of job that brings in a much higher income than the services rendered would warrant. * /Jack's job at the Athletic Club as Social Director ...
gray
See: GET GRAY HAIR or GET GRAY, GIVE GRAY HAIR.
grease monkey
{n., {slang} 1. A person who greases or works on machinery; a mechanic or worker in a garage or gasoline station. * /Hey, grease monkey, fill up my gas tank!/ * /The ...
grease one's palm
or[grease the palm] {slang} 1. To pay a person for something done or given, especially dishonestly; bribe. * /Some politicians will help you if you grease their palms./ 2. ...
grease the wheels
{v. phr.}, {informal} To do something or act to make something go smoothly or happen in the way that is wanted. * /Mr. Davis asked a friend to grease the wheels so he could ...
grease-ball
{n.}, {slang}, {derogatory} (avoid) An immigrant from a southern country, such as Mexico, Italy, or Spain; a person with oily looking black hair. * /Mr. White is a ...
greasy spoon
{n.}, {informal} Any small, inexpensive restaurant patronized by workers or people in a hurry; a place not noted for its excellence of cuisine or its decor. * /I won't have ...
great
See: THINK A GREAT DEAL OF.
great Godfrey
or[great guns] or[great Scott] {interj.}, {informal} A saying usually used to show surprise or anger. * /Great Godfrey! Uncle Willie is sitting on top of the flagpole!/ ...
great deal
See: GOOD DEAL.
great guns
{adv. phr.}, {informal} 1. Very fast or very hard. - Usually used in the phrases " blow great guns", "go great guns". * /The wind was blowing great guns, and big waves beat ...
great many
See: GOOD MANY.
great oaks from little acorns grow
As great oak trees grow from tiny acorns, so many great people or things grew from a small and unimportant beginning, so be patient. - A proverb. * /Many great men ...
Great Scott
See: GREAT GODFREY.
green
See: GRASS IS ALWAYS GREENER ON THE OTHER SIDE OF THE FENCE or GRASS IS ALWAYS GREENER ON THE OTHER SIDE OF THE HILL.
green around the gills
or[pale around the gills] {adj. phr.}, {slang} Pale-faced from fear or sickness; sickly; nauseated. * /Bill's father took him for a ride in his boat while the waves were ...
green power
{n.}, {slang}, {informal} The social prestige or power money can buy one. * /In American political elections the candidates that win are usually the ones who have ...
green thumb
{n.}, {informal} A talent for gardening; ability to make things grow. - Considered trite by many. * /Mr. Wilson's neighbors say his flowers grow because he has a ...
green with envy
{adj. phr.} Very jealous; full of envy. * /Alice's girlfriends were green with envy when they saw her new dress./ * /The other boys were green with envy ...
green-eyed monster
{n. phr.} Jealousy; envy. * /When John's brother got the new bicycle, the green-eyed monster made John fight with him./
grief
See: COME TO GRIEF, GOOD GRIEF, GOOD NIGHT(2) or GOOD GRIEF.
grin and bear it
{v. phr.}, {informal} To be as cheerful as possible in pain or trouble; do something without complaining. * /The doctor told Mrs. Howard that she had to stop eating ...
grind
See: AX TO GRIND.
grind to a halt
{v. phr.}, {informal} To slow down and stop like a machine does when turned off. * /The old car ground to a halt in front of the house./ * /The Cardinals' offense ...
grindstone
See: KEEP ONE'S NOSE TO THE GRINDSTONE.
grip
See: COME TO GRIPS WITH, LOSE ONE'S GRIP.
groove
See: IN THE GROOVE.
gross out
{v.}, {slang} To commit a vulgar act; to repel someone by saying a disgusting or vulgar thing. * /You are going to gross out people if you continue talking like that./
gross-out session
{n.}, {slang}, {avoidable} A verbal contest between teen-agers in which the object of the game is to see who can be more disgusting or vulgar than anybody else. * /When ...
ground
See: BREAK GROUND, COMMON GROUND, COVER GROUND or COVER THE GROUND, CUT THE GROUND FROM UNDER, EAR TO THE GROUND, FEET ON THE GROUND, GAIN GROUND, GET OFF THE ...
ground ball
{n.} A ball batted onto the ground in baseball; a grounder. * /Taylor hit a ground ball to the short-stop./
ground floor
{n.} 1. First floor of a house or building. * /Mrs. Turner has an apartment on the ground floor./ 2. {informal} The first or best chance, especially in a business. * /That ...
ground rule
{n.} 1. A rule in sports that is made especially for the grounds or place where a game is played. - Usually used in the plural. * /There was such a big crowd at the ...
grow
See: GREAT OAKS PROM LITTLE ACORNS GROW, LET GRASS GROW UNDER ONE'S FEET.
grow on
or[grow upon] {v.} 1. To become stronger in; increase as a habit of. * /The habit of eating before going to bed grew upon John./ 2. To become more interesting to or liked ...
grow out of
{v. phr.} 1. To outgrow; become too mature for. * /As a child he had a habit of scratching his chin all the time, but he grew out of it./ 2. To result from; arise. * /Tom's ...
grow up
{v.} 1. To increase in size or height; become taller or older; reach full height. * /Johnny is growing up; his shoes are too small for him./ * /I grew up on a farm./ * ...
growing pains
{n.} 1. Pains in children's legs supposed to be caused by changes in their bodies and feelings as they grow. * /The little girl's legs hurt, and her mother told her ...
grudge
See: NURSE A GRUDGE.
guard
See: COLOR GUARD, OFF GUARD, ON GUARD.
guest
See: BF. MY GUEST.
gum up
{v.}, {slang} To cause not to work or ruin; spoil; make something go wrong. - Often used in the phrase "gum up the works". * /Jimmy has gummed up the typewriter./ Syn.: ...
gun
See: BIG CHEESE or BIG GUN, GIVE IT THE GUN or GIVE HER THE GUN, GREAT GODFREY or GREAT GUNS, JUMP THE GUN, SON OF A GUN, STICK TO ONE'S GUNS or STAND BY ONE'S GUNS, ...
gun for
{v.}, {informal} 1. To hunt for with a gun; look hard for a chance to harm or defeat. * /The cowboy is gunning for the man who stole his horse./ * /Bob is gunning for me ...
gung-ho
{adj.}, {colloquial} Enthusiastic, full of eagerness in an uncritical or unsophisticated manner. * /Suzie is all gung-ho on equal rights for women, but fails to see the ...
gut feeling
{n. phr.} An instinctive reaction. * /I have a gut feeling that they will never get married in spite of all they say./
gut reaction
{n. phr.} A mental or physical response that springs from one's depths. * /My gut reaction was to get out of here as fast as possible./
gut talk
{n. phr.} Sincere, honest talk. * /We admire people who speak gut talk and tell exactly what they think and feet./
guts
See: HATE ONE'S GUTS, HAVE THE GUTS TO DO SOMETHING.
guy
See: REGULAR GUY, WISE GUY.
hackle
See: RAISE HACKLES or RAISE ONE'S HACKLES.
had as soon
or[had as lief] See: AS SOON.
had better
or[had best] {informal} Should; must. * /I had better leave now, or I'll be late./ * /If you want to stay out of trouble, you had best not make any mistakes. / * /Jim ...
had rather
or[had sooner] {v.} To choose to (do one thing instead of another thing); like better to; would prefer to. - Used with an infinitive without "to". * /My aunt invited ...
hail from
{v.}, {informal} To have your home in; come from; be from; especially, to have been born and raised in. * /Mrs. Gardner hails from Mississippi./ * /Mr. Brown and Mr. ...
hail-fellow-well-met(1)
{adj. phr.} Talking easily and in a friendly way to everyone you meet. * /John won the election as class president because he was hail-fellow-well-met./
hail-fellow-well-met(2)
{n. phr.} A good friend and companion; buddy; pal. * /John just moved to town but he and the boys in the neighborhood are already hail-fellows-well-met./
hair
See: CURL ONE'S HAIR, GET GRAY HAIR or GET GRAY, GIVE GRAY HAIR, HANG BY A THREAD or HANG BY A HAIR, HIDE OR HAIR or HIDE NOR HAIR, IN ONE'S HAIR, LET ONE'S HAIR ...
hair stand on end
{informal} The hair of your head rises stiffly upwards as a sign or result of great fright or horror. * /When he heard the strange cry, his hair stood on end./ * /The ...
haircut place
{n.}, {slang}, {citizen's band radio jargon} Bridge or overpass with tight clearance. * /Are we going to make it in that haircut place?/
hairdo
{n.} Style or manner of arranging, combing, or wearing one's hair. * /"How do you like my new hairdo?" Jane asked, as she left the beauty parlor./
hale and hearty
{adj. phr.} In very good health; well and strong. * /Grandfather will be 80 years old tomorrow, but he is hale and hearty./ * /That little boy looks hale and hearty, as if ...
half
See: GO HALVES, GO OFF HALF-COCKED also GO OFF AT HALF COCK, IN HALF, SIX OF ONE AND HALF-A-DOZEN OF THE OTHER, TIME AND A HALF, TOO-BY HALF.
half a chance
or[a half chance] {n.} An opportunity; a reasonable chance. * /Just give yourself half a chance and you will quickly get used to your new job./
half a loaf is better than none
or[half a loaf is better than no bread] Part of what we want or need is better than nothing. - A proverb. * /Albert wanted two dollars for shoveling snow from the ...
half a mind
also[half a notion] {n. phr.}, {informal} A wish or plan that you have not yet decided to act on; a thought of possibly doing something. - Used after "have" or "with" and ...
half an eye
{n. phr.} A slight glance; a quick look. * /The substitute teacher could see with half an eye that she was going to have trouble with the class./ * /While Mary was ...
half bad
See: NOT BAD.
half the battle
{n.phr.} A large part of the work. * /When you write an essay for class, making the outline is half the battle./ * /To see your faults and decide to change is half ...
half-and-half(1)
{adj.} As much one thing as the other. * /We asked the coach if more boys than girls were interested in debating, and he said it was about half-and-half./ * /The show last ...
half-and-half(2)
{n.} A mixture of milk and cream in equal parts, used with cereal or coffee. * /John uses half-and-half with his cereal, but his wife, who is dieting, uses milk./
half-baked
{adj.}, {informal} Not thought out or studied thoroughly; not worth considering or accepting. * /We wish Tom would not take our time at meetings to offer his half-baked ...
half-hearted
{adj.} Lacking enthusiasm or interest. * /Phil made several half-hearted attempts to learn word processing, but we could see that he didn't really like it./
half-holiday
{n.} A day on which you get out of school or work in the afternoon. * /The principal said that Tuesday would be a half-holiday./
half-time
{n.} A rest period in the middle of certain games. * /I saw Henry at the football game and I went over and talked to him at half-time./ * /The pep squad put on a drill ...
halfway
See: GO HALFWAY or MEET ONE HALF-WAY or GO HALFWAY TO MEET ONE.
hall
See: WITHIN CALL or WITHIN HAIL.
halt
See: CALL A HALT, GRIND TO A HALT.
ham actor
{n. phr.}, {slang} An untalented actor; someone who tries so hard to act that his performance becomes foolishly exaggerated. * /Fred is a ham actor who, instead ...
ham it up
{v. phr.}, {slang} To do more than look natural in acting a part; pretend too much; exaggerate. * /When Tom told the teacher he was too sick to do homework, he really ...
ham-handed
{adj.}, {slang} 1. Having very large hands. * /Pete is a big, ham-handed man who used to be a football player./ 2. See: HEAVY-HANDED.
hammer
See: GO AT IT HAMMER AND TONGS, UNDER THE HAMMER.
hammer and tongs
{adv. phr.} Violently. * /Mr. and Mrs. Smith have been at it all day, hammer and tongs./
hammer at
or[hammer away at] {v.} 1. To work steadily at; keep at. * /That lesson is not easy, but hammer away at it and you will get it right./ 2. To talk about again and again; ...
hammer out
{v.} 1. To write or produce by hard work. * /The President sat at his desk till midnight hammering out his speech for the next day./ 2. To remove, change, or work out ...
Hancock
See: JOHN HANCOCK or JOHN HENRY.
hand
See: AT HAND, BIRD IN THE HAND IS WORTH TWO IN THE BUSH, BITE THE HAND THAT FEEDS ONE, CLEAN HANDS, DIRTY ONE'S HANDS, EAT OUT OF ONE'S HAND, FORCE ONE'S HAND, FREE ...
hand and foot
{adv. phr.} 1. So that the hands and feet cannot be used. - Used with " bind" or a synonym. * /The robbers bound him hand and foot and left him on the floor./ 2. So that ...
hand and glove
See: HAND IN GLOVE.
hand down
{v.} To arrange to give or leave after, death. * /Joe will have his father's gold watch because it is handed down in the family./ * /In old times, property was usually ...
hand in
See: TURN IN(1).
hand in glove
or[hand and glove] {adj.} or {adv. phr.} Very close or friendly; working together; in very close agreement or cooperation, especially for bad purposes. * /The Navy ...
hand in hand
{adv. phr.} 1. Holding hands. * /Bob and Mary walked along hand in hand in the park./ Compare: ARM IN ARM. 2. Accompanying each other; together; closely connected. - ...
hand it to
{v. phr.}, {informal} To admit the excellence of; give credit or praise to. * /You have to hand it to Jim; he is very careful and hard-working in all he does./ * /The teacher ...
hand off
{v.} To hand the football to another back. * /The quarterback faked to the fullback and handed off to the halfback./
hand on
{v.} To pass along to the next person who should have it. * /Everyone in class should read this, so when you have finished, please hand it on./ * /In the early days, ...
hand out
{v.}, {informal} To give (things of the same kind) to several people. * /The teacher handed out the examination papers./ * /At the Christmas party Santa Claus handed out ...
hand over
{v.} To give control or possession of; give (something) to another person. * /When the teacher saw Johnny reading a comic book in study period, she made him hand over the ...
hand over fist
{adv. phr.}, {informal} Fast and in large amounts. * /Fred may get a pony for Christmas because his father is making money hand over fist./ * /Business is so bad that ...
hand over hand
{adv. phr.} By taking hold with one hand over the other alternately. * /The only way to climb a rope is hand over hand./
hand something to someone on a silver platter
{v. phr.} To give a person a reward that has not been earned. * /The lazy student expected his diploma to be handed to him on a silver platter./
hand to hand
{adv. phr.} Close together, near enough to hit each other. * /The two soldiers fought hand to hand until one fell badly wounded./ * /In modern naval warfare, men seldom ...
hand-me-down
{n.}, {informal} Something given away after another person has no more use for it; especially, used clothing. * /Alice had four older sisters, so all her clothes were ...
hand-pick
{v.}, {informal} To choose very carefully. * /This debating team should win because its members are all hand-picked./ * /The political bosses hand-picked a man for mayor ...
hand-to-hand
{adj.} Close to each other; near enough to hit each other. * /The result of the battle was decided in hand-to-hand combat./ * /When the police tried to break up ...
hand-to-mouth
{adj.} Not providing for the future; living from day to day; not saving for later. * /Many native tribes lead a hand-to-mouth existence, content to have food for one ...
handle
See: FLY OFF THE HANDLE.
handle to one's name
{n. phr.}, {slang} A special title used before your name. * /Jim's father has a handle to his name. He is Major Watson./ * /Bob came back from the University with a ...
handle with gloves
or[handle with kid gloves] {v. phr.}, {informal} 1. To treat very gently and carefully. * /An atomic bomb is handled with kid gloves./ 2. To treat with great tact and ...
handout
{n.} 1. A free gift of food, clothes, etc. * /The homeless people were standing in a long line for various handouts./ 2. A typed and photocopied sheet or sheets of ...
hands down
{adv.}, {informal} 1. Without working hard; easily. * /The Rangers won the game hands down./ 2. Without question or doubt; without any opposition; plainly. * /Johnny was ...
hands off
{informal} Keep your hands off or do not interfere; leave that alone. - Used as a command. * /I was going to touch the machine, but the man cried, "Hands off!" and I let ...
hands up
{informal} Hold up your hands! Put your hands up high and keep them there! - Used as a command. * /The sheriff pointed his gun at the outlaws and called out, "Hands up!"/ ...
hands-down
{adj.}, {informal} 1. Easy. * /The Rangers won a hands-down victory in the tournament./ 2. Unopposed; first; clear. * /Johnny was the hands-down favorite for president ...
hands-off
{adj.}, {informal} Leaving alone, not interfering; inactive. * /The United States told the European governments to follow a hands-off policy toward Latin America./ * /I did ...
handsome is as handsome does
{informal} A person must act well and generously so that he will be truly worth respecting. - A proverb. * /Everyone thinks that Bon is a very handsome boy, but he is very ...
handwriting on the wall
{n. phr.} A sign that something bad will happen. * /When Bill's team lost four games in a row, he saw the handwriting on the wall./ * /John's employer had less and ...
hang
See: GO HANG, GIVE A HANG or CARE A HANG, GIVE ONE ENOUGH ROPE, AND HE WILL HANG HIMSELF, LEAVE HANGING or LEAVE HANGING IN THE AIR.
hang around
{v.}, {informal} 1. To pass time or stay near without any real purpose or aim; loaf near or in. * /The principal warned the students not to hang around the corner ...
hang back
or[hang off] or[hang behind] 1. To stay some distance behind or away, be unwilling to move forward. * /Mary offered the little girl candy, but she was shy and hung ...
hang behind
See: HANG BACK(1).
hang by a hair
See: HANG BY A THREAD.
hang by a thread
or[hang by a hair] {v. phr.} To depend on a very small thing; be in doubt. * /For three days Tom was so sick that his life hung by a thread./ * /As Joe got ready to ...
hang fire
{v. phr.} 1. To fail or be slow in shooting or firing. * /Smith pulled the trigger, but the gun hung fire and the deer escaped./ 2. To be slow in beginning; to be ...
hang heavy
or[hang heavy on one's hands] {v. phr.} To pass slowly or uninterestingly; be boring with little to do. * /The vacation time hung heavy on Dick's hands because all ...
hang in (there)
{v. phr.}, {slang}, {informal} To persevere; not to give up; to stick to a project and not lose faith or courage. * /Hang in there old buddy; the worst is yet to come./ ...
hang in effigy
or[burn in effigy] {v. phr.} To hang or burn a figure, usually a stuffed dummy, representing a person who is disliked or scorned. * /When the high school team lost the ...
hang in the balance
{v. phr.} To have two equally possible results; to be in doubt; be uncertain. * /Until Jim scored the winning touchdown, the outcome of the game hung in the balance./ ...
hang it
{interj.}, {informal} An exclamation used to express annoyance or disappointment. * /Oh, hang it! I forgot to bring the book I wanted to show you./ * /Hang it all, why ...
hang off
See: HANG BACK.
hang on
{v.} 1. To hold on to something, usually tightly. * /Jack almost fell off the cliff, but managed to hang on until help came./ Syn.: HOLD ON(1). 2a. To continue doing ...
hang on the words of
also[hang on the lips of] {v. phr.} To listen very attentively to. * /Ann hangs on every word of her history teacher and takes very careful notes. / * /As he went on ...
hang on to
{v.} To hold tightly; keep firmly. * /The child hung on to its mother's apron, and would not let go./ * /John did not like his job, but decided to hang on to it until he ...
hang on to one's mother's apron strings
See: TIED TO ONE'S MOTHER'S APRON STRINGS.
hang on to your hat
or[hold on to your hat] or[hold your hat] {v. phr.}, {informal} 1. Watch out; be prepared. - Used as a command, usually to warn of an unexpected action. * /"Hold on to your ...
hang one on
{v. phr.}, {slang} 1. To give a heavy blow to; hit hard. * /The champion hung one on his challenger in the second round and knocked him out of the ring./ 2. To get very ...
hang one's head
{v. phr.} To bend your head forward in shame. * /Johnny hung his head when the teacher asked him if he broke the window./ Compare: HIDE ONE'S HEAD.
hang out
{v.} 1. {slang} To spend your time idly or lounging about. * /The teacher complained that Joe was hanging out in poolrooms instead of doing his homework./ Compare: HANG ...
hang out one's shingle
{v. phr.}, {informal} To give public notice of the opening of an office, especially a doctor's or lawyer's office, by putting up a small signboard. * /The young doctor ...
hang over
{v.} 1. To be going to happen to; threaten. * /Great trouble hangs over the little town because its only factory has closed down./ 2. To remain to be finished or settled. * ...
hang over one's head
{v. phr.} To be a danger or threat to you. - An overused phrase. * /Over Jimmy's head hung the teacher's suspicion that Jimmy had cheated in the final examination./ * /Death ...
hang round
See: HANG AROUND.
hang ten
{v.}, {slang} 1. To be an outstanding performer on a surfboard or on a skateboard (referring to the user's ten toes). * /I bet I am going to be able to hang ten if you let ...
hang together
{v.} 1. To stay united; help and defend one another. * /The club members always hung together when one of them was in trouble./ Syn.: STICK TOGETHER. Compare: STAND ...
hang up
{v.} 1. To place on a hook, peg, or hanger. * /When the children come to school, they hang up their coats in the cloakroom./ 2a. To place a telephone receiver back on ...
hang-up
{n.}, {informal} (stress on "hang") 1. A delay in some process. * /The mail has been late for several days; there must be some hang-up with the trucks somewhere./ 2. A ...
hanger
See: CREPE HANGER.
hangover
{n.} A bad feeling of nausea and/or headache the day after one has had too much to drink. * /Boy, did I have a hangover after that party yesterday!/
happen on
or[happen upon] {v.}, {literary} To meet or find accidentally or by chance. * /The Girl Scouts happened on a charming little brook not far from the camp./ * /At the ...
happy
See: STRIKE A HAPPY MEDIUM, TRIGGER HAPPY at QUICK ON THE TRIGGER.
happy as the day is long
{adj. phr.} Cheerful and happy. * /Carl is happy as the day is long because school is over for the summer./
happy hour
{n.}, {informal} A time in bars or restaurants when cocktails are served at a reduced rate, usually one hour before they start serving dinner. * /Happy hour is between ...
happy hunting ground
{n. phr.} 1. The place where, in American Indian belief, a person goes after death; heaven. * /The Indians believed that at death they went to the happy hunting ...
happy-go-lucky
See: FOOTLOOSE AND FANCY-FREE.
hard
See: GIVE A HARD TIME, GO HARD WITH, SCHOOL OF HARD KNOCKS.
hard as nails
{adj. phr.}, {informal} 1. Not flabby or soft; physically very fit; tough and strong. * /After a summer of work in the country, Jack was as hard as nails, without a ...
hard cash
See: COLD CASH.
hard feeling
{n.} Angry or bitter feeling; enmity. - Usually used in the plural. * /Jim asked Andy to shake hands with him, just to show that there were no hard feelings./ * /Bob and ...
hard going
{adj. phr.} Fraught with difficulty. * /Dave finds his studies of math hard going./
hard line
{n. phr.} Tough political policy. * /Although modern economists were trying to persuade him to open up to the West, Castro has always taken the hard line approach./
hard luck
See: TOUGH LUCK.
hard nut to crack
also[tough nut to crack] {n. phr.}, {informal} Something difficult to understand or to do. * /Tom's algebra lesson was a hard nut to crack./ * /Mary found knitting a hard ...
hard of hearing
{adj.} Partially deaf. * /Some people who are hard of hearing wear hearing aids./
hard put
or[hard put to it] {adj.} In a difficult position; faced with difficulty; barely able. * /John was hard put to find a good excuse for his lateness in coming to ...
hard row to hoe
or[tough row to hoe] {n. phr.} A hard life to live; a very hard job to do. * /She has a hard row to hoe with six children and her husband dead./ * /Young people ...

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