Слова на букву hard-in a (459) Словарь американских идиом
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Слова на букву hard-in a (459)

1 2 > >>
hard sell
{n.}, {informal} A kind of salesmanship characterized by great vigor, aggressive persuasion, and great eagerness on the part of the person selling something; opposed to "soft ...
hard sledding
or[rough sledding] or[tough sledding] {n.}, {informal} Difficulty in succeeding or making progress. * /Jane had hard sledding in her math course because she was poorly ...
hard up
{adj.}, {informal} Without enough money or some other needed thing. * /Dick was hard up and asked Lou to lend him a dollar./ * /The campers were hard up for water because ...
hard way
{n.} The harder or more punishing of two or more ways to solve a problem, do something, or learn something. - Used with "the". * /The mayor refused the help of the crooks and ...
hard-and-fast
{adj.} Not to be broken or changed; fixed; strict. * /The teacher said that there was a hard-and-fast rule against smoking in the school./
hard-boiled
{adj.} Unrefined; tough; merciless. * /"Because you were two minutes late," my hard-boiled boss cried, "I will deduct fifteen minutes worth from your salary!"/
hard-fisted
{adj.} 1. Able to do hard physical labor; strong. * /Jack's uncle was a hard-fisted truck driver with muscles of steel./ 2. Not gentle or easy-going; tough; stern. * /The ...
hard-hitting
{adj.} Working hard to get things done; strong and active; stubbornly eager. * /The boys put on a hard-hitting drive to raise money for uniforms for the football ...
hard-liner
{n.} A politician who takes the hard line. See: HARD LINE.
hard-nosed
{adj.}, {slang} Tough or rugged; very strict; not weak or soft; stubborn, especially in a fight or contest. * /Joe's father was a hard-nosed army officer who had seen service ...
hard-on
{n.}, {vulgar}, {avoidable}. An erection of the male sexual organ.
hard-top
{n.} 1. A car that has a metal roof; a car that is not a convertible. * /Every spring Mr. Jones sells his hard-top and buys a convertible./ 2. or[hardtop convertible] A car ...
hardheaded
{adj.} Stubborn; shrewd; practical. * /Don is a hardheaded businessman who made lots of money, even during the recession./
hardhearted
{adj.} Unsympathetic; merciless. * /Jack is so hardhearted that even his own children expect nothing from him./
hardly any
or[scarcely any] Almost no or almost none; very few. * /Hardly any of the students did well on the test, so the teacher explained the lesson again./ * /Charles and his ...
hardly ever
or[scarcely ever] {adv. phr.} Very rarely; almost never; seldom. * /It hardly ever snows in Florida./ * /Johnny hardly ever reads a book./
hare
See: MAD AS A HATTER or MAD AS A MARCH HARE, RUN WITH THE HARE AND HUNT (RIDE) WITH THE HOUNDS.
harebrained
{adj.} Thoughtless; foolish. * /Most of the harebrained things Ed does may be attributable to his youth and lack of experience./
hark back
{v.}, {literary} 1. To recall or turn back to an earlier time or happening. * /Judy is always harking back to the good times she had at camp./ 2. To go back to something ...
harp away at
or[on] {v.} To mention again and again. * /In his campaign speeches, Jones harps on his rival's wealth and powerful friends./
Harry
See: TOM, DICK, AND HARRY.
harum-scarum(1)
{adv.}, {informal} In a careless, disorderly or reckless way. * /Jim does his homework harum-scarum, and that is why his schoolwork is so poor./
harum-scarum(2)
{adj.}, {informal} Careless, wild, or disorderly in one's acts or performance; reckless. * /Jack is such a harum-scarum boy that you can never depend on him to do anything ...
hash
See: SETTLE ONE'S HASH, SLING HASH.
hash house
{n.}, {slang} An eating place where cheap meals are served. * /Joe and his friends went to a hash house around the corner after the game./
hash out
{v.}, {informal} To talk all about and try to agree on; discuss thoroughly. * /The teacher asked Susan and Jane to sit down together and hash out their differences./ * /The ...
hash up
{v.}, {slang} 1. To make a mess of; do badly. * /Bob really hashed up that exam and failed the course./ 2. To bring to life; remember and talk about. * /The teacher ...
haste
See: MAKE HASTE.
hat
See: AT THE DROP OF A HAT, BRASS HAT, HANG ON TO YOUR HAT or HOLD ON TO YOUR HAT or HOLD YOUR HAT, HIGH-HAT, KEEP UNDER ONE'S HAT, OLD HAT, PULL OUT OF A HAT, TAKE OFF ...
hat in hand
{adv. phr.}, {informal} In a humble and respectful manner. * /They went hat in hand to the old woman to ask for her secret recipe./
hatch
See: COUNT ONE'S CHICKENS BEFORE THEY ARE HATCHED.
hatchet
See: BURY THE HATCHET.
hatchet face
{n.} A long narrow face with sharp parts; also, a person with such a face. * /Johnny was sent to the principal's office because he called his teacher old hatchet ...
hatchet job
{n. phr.}, {slang} 1. The act of saying or writing terrible things about someone or something, usually on behalf of one's boss or organization. * /When Phil makes ...
hatchet man
{n.}, {colloquial} 1. A politician or newspaper columnist whose job is to write and say unfavorable things about the opposition. * /Bill Lerner is the hatchet man for the ...
hate one's guts
{v. phr.}, {slang} To feel a very strong dislike for someone. * /Dick said that he hated Fred's guts because Fred had been very mean to him./
hats off to
or[one's hat is off to] {truncated phr.}, {informal} Used to recognize and praise a job well-done. * /Hats off to anyone who runs the twenty-six mile race./ * /My hat is off ...
hatter
See: MAD AS A HATTER.
haul
See: LONG HAUL.
haul down
{v.}, {informal} 1. To catch (as a ball) usually after a long run. * /Willie hauled down a long fly to center field for the third out./ * /The star halfback hauled ...
haul down one's colors
or[strike one's colors] {v. phr.} 1. To pull down a flag, showing you are beaten and want to stop fighting. * /After a long battle, the pirate captain hauled down his ...
haul in
or[haul up] or[pull in] {v.}, {slang} To bring before someone in charge for punishment or questioning; arrest. * /John was hauled in to court for speeding./ * /The ...
haul in one's horns
See: PULL IN ONE'S HORNS.
haul off
{v.} To move suddenly. - Used with "and" usually before a verb like "hit" or "kick". * /Ed hauled off and hit the other boy in the nose./ * /Lee hauled off and threw a ...
haul over the coals
or[rake over the coals] {v. phr.} To criticize sharply; rebuke; scold. * /The sergeant raked the soldier over the coals for being late for roll call./ Syn.: DRESS ...
have
See: CAT HAS NINE LIVES, ONE'S CAKE AND HAVE IT TOO, EVERY CLOUD HAS A SILVER LINING, EVERY DOG HAS HIS DAY, HAVE NOTHING ON or HAVE ANYTHING ON, LITTLE PITCHERS ...
have a soft spot in one's heart for
{v. phr.} To be sympathetically inclined towards; entertain a predilection for. * /Ron always had a soft spot in his heart for intellectual women wearing miniskirts./
have one's ass in a sling
{v. phr.}, {slang}, {vulgar}, {avoidable} To be in an uncomfortable predicament; to be in the dog-house; to be at a disadvantage. * /Al sure had his ass in a sling ...
have someone by the balls
{v. phr.}, {slang}, {vulgar}, {avoidable} To have someone at a disadvantage or in one's power. * /The kidnappers had the company by the balls for six long weeks./
have a (good) head for
{v. phr.} To have a special talent in a certain area. * /Joan has quite a good head for business administration./
have a (good) mind to
{v. phr.} To consider doing; intend to with a high degree of probability. * /I have a good mind to tell my boss that he doesn't know how to run our enterprise./
have a ball
{v. phr.}, {slang} Enjoy yourself very much; have a wonderful time. * /Johnny had a ball at camp./ * /Mary and Tim have a ball exploring the town./ * /After their parents ...
have a bone to pick
See: BONE TO PICK.
have a care
{v. phr.}, {formal} To be careful what you do. * /Jane, have a care what you're doing with that valuable glass./ * /The judge told him to have a care what he said in ...
have a field day
{v. phr.} To enjoy great success or unlimited opportunity. * /The visiting basketball team was so weak that our school had a field day scoring one point after another./
have a finger in the pie
See: FINGER IN THE PIE.
have a fit
or[have fits] or[throw a fit] {v. phr.} 1. To have a sudden illness with stiffness or jerking of the body. * /Our dog had a fit yesterday./ 2. {informal} To become angry or ...
have a go at
{v. phr.}, {informal} To try, especially after others have tried. * /Bob asked Dick to let him have a go at shooting at the target with Dick's rifle./ * /She had a go at ...
have a good head on one's shoulders
{v. phr.} To be smart; intelligent; well educated. * /Rob is not the handsomest guy in the world but the girls appreciate him because he has a good head on his ...
have a hand in
{v. phr.} To have a part in or influence over; to be partly responsible for. * /Sue's schoolmates respect her and she has a hand in every important decision made by the ...
have a heart
{v. phr.}, {informal} To stop being mean; be kind, generous, or sympathetic. * /Have a heart, Bob, and lend me two dollars./ * /Have a heart, Mary, and help me with ...
have a heart-to-heart talk
{v. phr.} To confide in someone with great intimacy. * /Jill and her mother had a heart-to-heart talk before she decided to move in with Andrew./
have a mind of one's own
{v. phr.} To be independent in one's thinking and judgment. * /Tow has always had a mind of his own so there is no use trying to convince him how to vote./
have a nodding acquaintance with
See: NODDING ACQUAINTANCE.
have a price on one's head
See: PRICE ON ONE'S HEAD.
have a rough idea about
See: ROUGH IDEA.
have a say in
or[a voice in] {v. phr.} To have the right to express one's opinion or cast a vote in a pending matter. * /Our boss is friendly and democratic; he always encourages us ...
have a screw loose
{v. phr,}, {slang} To act in a strange way; to be foolish. * /Now I know he has a screw loose - he stole a police car this time./ * /He was a smart man but had a screw ...
have a snowball's chance in hell
{v. phr.} To be condemned to failure; enjoy a zero chance of success. * /Pessimists used to think that we had a snowball's chance in hell to put a man on the moon; yet ...
have a sweet tooth
{v. phr.} To be excessively fond of dessert items, such as ice cream, pies, etc. * /Jill has a sweet tooth; she always orders apple pie after a meal in a restaurant./ ...
have a time
{v. phr.}, {informal} 1. To have trouble; have a hard time. * /Poor Susan had a time trying to get the children to go to bed./ * /John had a time passing his math course./ ...
have a way with
{v. phr.} To be able to lead, persuade, or influence. * /Dave has such a way with the campers that they do everything he tells them to do./ * /Ted will be a good ...
have a word with
{v. phr.} 1. To talk, discuss, or speak briefly with. * /Robert, I need to have a word with you about tomorrow's exam./ 2. To engage in a sincere discussion with the ...
have all one's buttons
or[have all one's marbles] {v. phr.}, {slang} To have all your understanding; be reasonable. - Usually used in the negative or conditionally. * /Mike acts sometimes as if ...
have an affair with
{v. phr.} To have a sexual relationship with someone, either before marriage or outside of one's marriage. * /Tow and Jane had a long and complex affair but they never got ...
have an ear for
{v. phr.} To have a keen perception; have a taste or a talent for; be sensitive to something. * /I have no ear whatsoever for foreign languages or music./
have an ear to the ground
See: EAR TO THE GROUND.
have an edge on
{v. phr.}, {informal} 1. To have an advantage over someone or something else in the course of an evaluative comparison. * /I can't beat you at tennis, but I have ...
have an eye
to See: EYE TO.
have an eye for
{v. phr.} To be able to judge correctly of; have good taste in. * /She has an eye for color and style in clothes./ * /He has an eye for good English usage./
have an eye on
or[have one's eye on] {v. phr.}, {informal} 1. To look at or think about (something wanted); have a wish for; have as an aim. * /I bought ice cream, but Jimmy had his eye on ...
have an eye out
See: EYE OUT.
have an itch for
or[to do] See: BE ITCHING TO.
have been around
{v. phr.}, {informal} Have been to many places and done many things; know people; have experience and be able to take care of yourself. * /Uncle Willie is an old sailor and has ...
have dibs on
or[put dibs on] {v. phr.}, {slang} To demand a share of something or to be in line for the use of an object usable by more than one person. * /Don't throw your magazine ...
have done
{v.}, {formal} To stop; finish. * /When the teacher had done, she asked for questions from the class./ * /If you have done, I will explain the matter./
have done with
{v.} To stop doing or using something. * /When you have done with that paintbrush, Barbara, I would like to use it. * /I wish you would have done with your criticisms./
have eyes only for
{v. phr.} To see or want nothing else but; give all your attention to; be interested only in. * /Of all the horses in the show, John had eyes only for the big white ...
have fits
See: HAVE A FIT.
have got to
{v. phr.} Must; be in great need to do something; be obliged to. * /I am sorry but we have got to leave, otherwise, we'll miss the last train./
have had it
{v. phr.}, {slang} To have experienced or suffered all you can; to have come to the end of your patience or life. * /"I've had it," said Lou, "I'm resigning from the ...
have hair
{v. phr.}, {slang} To possess courage, fortitude, guts, sex-appeal. * /I like him, he's got a lot of hair./
have in mind
{v. phr.} To plan; intend; select. * /We don't know whom our boss has in mind for the new position./
have in one's hair
See: IN ONE'S HAIR.
have in the palm of one's hand
{v. phr.} To completely control; have a project finished, all wrapped up. * /Our boss felt that if he could calm his critics he would soon have the entire factory in the ...
have it
{v. phr.} 1. To hear or get news; understand. * /I have it on the best authority that we will be paid for our work next week./ 2. To do something in a certain way. * /Make up ...
have it all over
See: HAVE IT OVER.
have it coming
{v. phr.} To deserve the good or bad things that happen to you. * /I feel sorry about Jack's failing that course, but he had it coming to him./ * /Everybody said that Eve ...
have it in for
{v. phr.}, {informal} To wish or mean to harm; have a bitter feeling against. * /George has it in for Bob because Bob told the teacher that George cheated in the ...
have it made
{v. phr.}, {slang} To be sure of success; have everything you need. * /With her fine grades Alice has it made and can enter any college in the country./ * /The other ...
have it out
{v. phr.} To settle a difference by a free discussion or by a fight. * /Joe called Bob a bad name, so they went back of the school and had it out. Joe got a bloody nose and ...
have it over
or[have it all over] {v. phr.} To be better than; be superior to. * /Anne has it all over Jane in looks and charm./ * /A professional golfer usually has it all over an ...
have kittens
{v. phr.}, {slang} To become very much worried or upset. * /Mrs. Jones was having kittens because if was very late and Susan wasn't home yet./ Compare: HAVE A FIT.
have lots (everything) going for one
{v. phr.} To have abilities or qualities that help in achieving one's goal; assets working in one's favor. * /The young woman will surely get the job; she has ...
have money to burn
See: MONEY TO BURN.
have no business
{v. phr.} To have no right or reason. * /Jack had no business saying those nasty things about Dick./ * /Vern's mother told him he had no business going swimming that ...
have no use for
See: NO USE.
have none of
{v. phr.} To refuse to approve or allow. * /The teacher said she would have none of Mike's arguing./ * /When the fullback refused to obey the captain, the captain said ...
have nothing on
or[not have anything on] {v. phr.} Not to be any better than; to have no advantage over. * /Susan is a wonderful athlete, but when it comes to dancing she has ...
have nothing to do with
{v. phr.} To not be involved with; not care about. * /Our firm has nothing to do with oil from the Near East; we are interested in solar energy./
have on
{v.} 1. To be dressed in; wear. * /Mary had on her new dress./ 2. To have (something) planned; have an appointment; plan to do. * /Harry has a big weekend on./ * /I'm sorry ...
have on the ball
See: ON THE BALL.
have one's cake and eat it too
{v. phr.} To enjoy two opposite advantages. * /You can either spend your money going to Europe or save it for a down payment on a house, but you can't do both. That would be ...
have one's ear
{v. phr.} To have access to someone in power; receive audiences rather frequently. * /The national security advisor has the president's ear./
have one's ears on
{v. phr.}, {slang}, {citizen's band radio jargon} To have one's CB radio in receiving condition. * /Good buddy in the eighteen wheeler southbound, got your ears on?/
have one's fill
{v. phr.} To be satisfied; be surfeited; be overindulged. * /Howard says he's had his fill of expensive golf tournaments in Europe./
have one's fling
{v. phr.} To have one or more romantic and/or sexual experiences, usually before marriage. * /Jack has had his fling and now seems to be ready to get married and settle down./
have one's hand in the till
See: ROB THE TILL.
have one's hands full
{v. phr.} To have as much work as you can do; be very busy. * /The plumber said that he had his hands full and could not take another job for two weeks./ * /With ...
have one's hands tied
See: TIED ONE'S HANDS.
have one's head in the sand
See: HIDE ONE'S HEAD IN THE SAND.
have one's head screwed on backwards
{v. phr.} To lack common sense; behave in strange and irrational ways. * /Henry seems to have his head screwed on backwards; he thinks the best time to get a suntan is ...
have one's heart in the right place
See: HEART IS IN THE RIGHT PLACE.
have one's hide
{v. phr.}, {informal} To punish severely. * /John's mother said she would have his hide if he was late to school again./
have one's nose to the grindstone
See: KEEP ONE'S NOSE TO THE GRINDSTONE.
have one's number
See: GET ONE'S NUMBER.
have one's wings clipped
See: CLIP ONE'S WING.
have one's wits about one
{v. phr.} To be alert; remain calm; not panic. * /Sam was the only one who kept his wits about him when the floodwaters of the Mississippi broke into our yard./
have one's work cut out
See: CUT OUT(1).
have oneself
{v. phr.}, {nonstandard} To enjoy. - Sometimes used in very informal speech to provide emphasis. * /As soon as their parents left, the boys had themselves some fun./ * ...
have or take a shot at
See: HAVE GO AT.
have qualms about
{v. phr.} To feel uneasy about; hesitate about something. * /Mike had no qualms in telling Sue that he was no longer in love with her./
have rocks in one's head
{v. phr.}, {informal} To be stupid; not have good judgment. * /When Mr. James quit his good job with the coal company to begin teaching school, some people thought he had ...
have second thoughts about
See: SECOND THOUGHT(s).
have seen better days
See: SEE BETTER DAYS.
have something going for one
{v. phr.}, {slang}, {informal} To have ability, talent; good looks, and/or influence in important places helping one to be successful. * /Well now, Pat Jones, that's ...
have something on
{v. phr.}, {informal} To have information or proof that someone did something wrong. * /Mr. Jones didn't want to run for office because he knew the opponents had something ...
have something on the ball
{v. phr.}, {slang}, {colloquial} To be smart, clever; to be skilled and have the necessary know-how. * /You can trust Syd; he's got a lot on the ball OR he's got something ...
have sticky fingers
See: STICKY FINGERS.
have the best of
or[have the better of] See: GET THE BETTER OF(2).
have the better of
or[have the best of] See: GET THE BETTER OF.
have the cart before the horse
See: CART BEFORE THE HORSE.
have the constitution of an ox
{v. phr.} To be able to work extremely hard and to have the stamina to overcome misfortune. * /Stan, who has lost both of his parents within one year and is ...
have the courage of one's convictions
{v. phr.} To be brave enough to act according to your beliefs. * /Steve showed that he had the courage of his convictions by refusing to help another student cheat in ...
have the goods on
See: GET THE GOODS ON.
have the guts to do something
{v. phr.}, {informal} To be brave enough to do something difficult or dangerous. * /Jack wants to marry Jilt, but he doesn't have the guts to pop the question./
have the jump on
See: GET THE JUMP ON.
have the last laugh
or[get the last laugh] {v. phr.} To make someone seem foolish for having laughed at you. * /Other schools laughed at us when our little team entered the state ...
have the laugh on
{v. phr.} To emerge as the victor. * /We were trying to fool Paul by setting him up with a blind date who was reportedly unattractive, but he had the laugh on us ...
have the lead
{v. phr.} To occupy the most prominent part in something. * /Maria has the lead in our school play./
have the makings of
{v. phr.} To possess the basic ingredients; have the basic qualities to do something. * /Tom is still young but he seems to have the makings of an excellent pianist./
have the right-of-way
{v. phr.} To have priority in proceeding in traffic on a public highway while other vehicles must yield and wait. * /"Go ahead," he said. "We have the right-of-way ...
have the time of one's life
See: TIME OF ONE'S LIFE.
have the worst of
See: GET THE WORST OF.
have to
or[have got to] {v.}, {informal} To be obliged or forced to; need to; must. * /Do you have to go now?/ * /He had to come. His parents made him./ * /I have got to go to the ...
have to do with
{v. phr.} 1. To be about; be on the subject of or connected with. * /The book has to do with airplanes./ 2. To know or be a friend of; work or have business with. - Usually ...
have too many irons in the fire
See: TOO MANY IRONS IN THE FIRE.
have two strikes against one
or[have two strikes on one] {v. phr.}, {informal} To have things working against you; be hindered in several ways; be in a difficult situation; be unlikely to succeed. * ...
haw
See: HEM AND HAW.
hay
See: HIT THE HAY.
haystack
See: NEEDLE IN A HAYSTACK.
haywire
See: GO HAYWIRE.
high
See: COME HELL OR HIGH WATER, FLYING HIGH, GO THROUGH HELL AND HIGH WATER, HELL AND HIGH WATER, HIT THE HIGH SPOTS, LIVE HIGH OFF THE HOG or EAT HIGH ON THE HOG, OFF ...
high camp
{n.}, {slang}, {show business} 1. Kitsch, or pretentious material in bad taste that is still liked by higher class audiences. * /"The Potsdam Quartet" is a play full ...
high and dry
{adv.} or {adj. phr.} 1. Up above the water; beyond the reach of splashing or waves. * /Mary was afraid she had left her towel where the tide would reach it, but she found ...
high and low
{adv.} Everywhere. * /The police were searching for the criminal high and low, but they couldn't find him./
high as a kite
{adj.} 1. As excited and happy as one can possibly be. * /When Eric won the lottery he was high as a kite./ 2. Intoxicated or under the influence of some drug. * ...
high fashion
or[high style] {n. phr.} The new style in women's dress set each season by designers in Paris or other fashion centers and accepted by fashionable women. * /The high ...
high gear
{n. phr.}, {informal} Top speed; full activity. * /Production got into high gear after the vacation./ * /An advertising campaign for the new toothpaste promptly moved ...
high jinks
{n. phr.}, {informal} Noisy or rough gaiety; wild play; tricks. * /The sailors were on shore leave, and high jinks were to be expected./ * /The high school seniors ...
high off the hog
See: LIVE HIGH OFF THE HOG.
high on
{adj. phr.} 1. Intoxicated on some drug or alcoholic drink. * /Rob was severely scolded by the dean for always being high on marijuana./ 2. Enthusiastic about something. * ...
high place
{n. phr.} A position of responsibility, honor, and power. * /Jones had reached a high place in the government at Washington./
high seas
{n. phr.} The open ocean, not the waters near the coast. * /It was a big powerful liner built to sail on the high seas./ * /The ships of every country have the right to ...
high season
{n. phr.} The time of year when the largest number of passengers are travelling; the time when airfare costs more. * /We had to pay $100 more for our tickets because it was ...
high sign
{n. phr.}, {informal} A silent signal of recognition, greeting, or warning; an open or secret signal between two persons. - Used with "get" or "give". * /The Joneses saw ...
high style
See: HIGH FASHION.
high time
{adj. phr.}, {used predicatively} (stress on "time") Dire, necessary, and sufficient circumstances prompting action. * /It is high time we sold the old house; it will fall ...
high-and-mighty
{adj.}, {informal} Feeling more important or superior to someone else; too proud of yourself. * /John wasn't invited to the party, because he acted too ...
high-class
{adj.} Of the best quality; very good; superior. - Avoided by many careful speakers. * /When Mr. Brown got a raise in pay, Mrs. Brown started to look for a high-class ...
high-handed
{adj.} Depending on force rather than right; bossy; dictatorial. * /With high-handed daring, John helped himself to the best food on the table./ * /Mr. Smith was a ...
high-hat(1)
{adj.}, {slang} Treating others as inferior; acting above others. /It was an expensive place to eat, and the customers were likely to be a little high-hat./ /Jones acted ...
high-hat(2)
{v.}, {slang} To treat others as inferior; look down on. * /After she had married a rich man, Mary high-hatted her former friends./ * /"Don't high-hat me," Fred warned, when ...
high-sounding
{adj.} Sounding important; said for showing off; too fancy. * /The politician's speech was full of high-sounding words./ * /Mr. Brown filled his son with many ...
high-strung
{adj.} Nervous; sensitive; tense. * /Gary has been rather high-strung lately because of too much work at the office./
highbrow
{adj.} Very well educated or even over-educated; belonging to the educated middle class; sophisticated. * /Certain novels are not for everyone and are ...
higher education
{n.} Schooling after graduation from high school, especially in a college or university. * /Tom plans to get his higher education at the state university./
higher-up
{n.}, {informal} One of the people who has one of the more important positions in an organization; an important official. * /The teacher's problem was discussed by the ...
hightail it
{v. phr.}, {slang} To travel fast; move rapidly. * /After school, Frank would hightail it home./ * /The two men who held up the bank hightailed it out of town./
highway
See: DIVIDED HIGHWAY or DUAL HIGHWAY.
highway robbery
{n. phr.} 1. A hold-up of or theft from a person committed on an open road or street usually by an armed man. * /Highway robbery was common in England in ...
hill
See: GRASS IS ALWAYS GREENER ON THE OTHER SIDE OF THE FENCE or GRASS IS ALWAYS GREENER ON THE OTHER SIDE OF THE HILL, HEAD FOR THE HILLS.
hilt
See: TO THE HILT or UP TO THE HILT.
hinge on
or[hinge upon] {v.} To depend on as decisive: be decided by. * /In a dictatorship, everything hinges on one man./ * /A tobacco grower's income for the year may hinge on ...
hire out
{v.}, {informal} 1. To accept a job; take employment. * /Frank hired out as a saxophonist with a dance band./ 2. To rent (as owner). * /John used to hire out his tractor ...
hired man
{n. phr.} A man employed to do jobs every day about a house or farm. * /The hired man was sick, and a lot of the daily chores were not done./
history
See: GO DOWN IN HISTORY or GO DOWN IN THE RECORDS.
hit
See: HARD-HITTING, MAKE A HIT, SMASH HIT.
hit the books
{v. phr.}, {informal} To study your school assignments, prepare for classes. * /Jack broke away from his friends, saying, "I've got to hit the books."/
hit the jackpot
{v. phr.}, {slang} To be very lucky or successful. * /Mr. Brown invented a new gadget which hit the jackpot./ * /Mrs. Smith hit the jackpot when she got Lula for a ...
hit and miss
See: HIT OR MISS.
hit below the belt
See: BELOW THE BELT.
hit between the eyes
{v. phr.}, {informal} To make a strong impression on; surprise greatly. * /Helen hit Joe right between the eyes the moment he saw her./ * /It was a wonderfully ...
hit bottom
or[touch bottom] {v. phr.}, {informal} 1. To be at the very lowest. * /In August there was a big supply of corn and the price hit bottom./ * /When Johnny failed the exam ...
hit home
{v. phr.} To go directly to the mark; strike a vulnerable spot. * /His remark hit home when he referred to those who do not contribute sufficiently to the college ...
hit it off
{v. phr.}, {informal} To enjoy one another's company; be happy and comfortable in each other's presence. * /Tom and Fred hit it off well with each other./ * /Mary and Jane hit ...
hit on
or[hit upon] {v.} To happen to meet, find, or reach; to choose or think by chance, * /John hit on a business that was just starting to grow rapidly./ * /There seemed ...
hit on all cylinders
{v. phr.} 1. To run smoothly or at full power without any missing or skipping. - Said of a motor. * /The mechanic tuned the car engine until it was hitting on all ...
hit one's stride
{v. phr.} 1. To walk or run at your best speed; reach your top speed or game. * /After walking the first mile, Jim was just hitting his stride./ * /The horse began to hit ...
hit or miss
also[hit and miss] {adv.} In an unplanned or uncontrolled way; aimlessly; carelessly. * /George didn't know which house on the street was Jane's, so he began ringing ...
hit parade
{n.} 1. A list of songs or tunes arranged in order of popularity. * /Tom was overjoyed when his new song was named on the hit parade on the local radio station./ 2. {slang} ...
hit the bull's-eye
{v. phr.}, {informal} To go to the important part of the matter; reach the main question. * /John hit the bull's-eye when he said the big question was one of ...
hit the ceiling
or[hit the roof] {v. phr.}, {slang} To become violently angry; go into a rage. * /When Elaine came home at three in the morning, her father hit the ceiling./ * /Bob hit the ...
hit the deck
{v. phr.} To get up from bed, to start working. (From sailor's language as in "All hands on the deck!") * /OK boys, it's time to hit the deck!/
hit the dirt
{v. phr.}, {slang}, {military} To take cover under gunfire by falling on the ground. * /We hit the dirt the moment we heard the machine gun fire./
hit the fan
{v. phr.}, {informal} To become a big public problem or controversy. * /The whole mess hit the fan when the judge was arrested for drunken driving for the second time./ ...
hit the hay
or[hit the sack] {v. phr.}, {slang} To go to bed. * /The men hit the hay early, in order to be out hunting at dawn./ * /Louis was so tired that he hit the sack soon ...
hit the high spots
{v. phr.} To consider, mention, or see only the more important parts of something such as a book, war, or school course. * /In his lecture, the speaker hit the high ...
hit the nail on the head
{v. phr.} To get something exactly right; speak or act in the most fitting or effective way. * /The mayor's talk on race relations hit the nail on the head./
hit the road
{v. phr.}, {slang} 1. To become a wanderer; to live an idle life; become a tramp or hobo. * /When Jack's wife left him, he felt a desire to travel, so he hit the road./ 2. To ...
hit the roof
See: HIT THE CEILING.
hit the sack
See: HIT THE HAY.
hit the sauce
{v. phr.}, {slang} To drink alcoholic beverages - especially heavily and habitually. * /When Sue left him, Joe began to hit the sauce./
hit the spot
{v. phr.}, {informal} To refresh fully or satisfy you; bring back your spirits or strength. - Used especially of food or drink. * /A cup of tea always hits the spot when ...
hit town
{v. phr.} To arrive in town. * /Give me a phone call as soon as you hit town./
hit upon
See: HIT ON.
hit-and-run
{adj.} 1. Of or about an accident after which a motorist drives away without giving his name and offering help. * /Judges are stern with hit-and-run drivers./ 2. ...
hit-or-miss
also[hit-and-miss] {adj.} Unplanned; uncontrolled; aimless; careless. * /John did a lot of hit-or-miss reading, some of it about taxes./ * /Mary packed her bag in ...
hitch one's wagon to a star
{v. phr.} To aim high; follow a great ambition or purpose, * /In trying to be a famous pianist, Mary had hitched her wagon to a star./ * /John hitched his wagon to a star ...
hither and thither
or[hither and yon] {adv. phr.}, {literary} In one direction and then in another. * /Bob wandered hither and thither looking for a playmate./ Compare: HERE AND THERE.
hither and yon
See: HITHER AND THITHER.
hitter
See: PINCH HIT, PINCH HITTER, PULL HITTER.
hob
See: PLAY THE DEVIL WITH or PLAY HOB WITH.
hoe
See: HARD ROW TO HOE or TOUGH ROW TO HOE.
hoe one's own row
{v. phr.} To make your way in life by your own efforts; get along without help. * /David's father died when he was little, and he has always had to hoe his own row./ Syn.: ...
hog
See: EAT (LIVE) HIGH ON THE HOG or EAT (LIVE) HIGH OFF THE HOG, GO THE WHOLE HOG or GO WHOLE HOG, ROAD HOG.
hog-tie
{v.}, {informal} 1. To tie (an animal) so it is unable to move or escape. * /The Cowboy caught a calf and hog-tied it./ 2. To make someone unable to act freely; limit. * /The ...
hoist with one's own petard
{adj. phr.} Caught in your own trap or trick. * /Jack carried office gossip to the boss until he was hoisted by his own petard./ (From Shakespeare; literally, blown ...
hold
See: GET HOLD OF, LAY HOLD OF, LEAVE HOLDING THE BAG or LEAVE HOLDING THE SACK.
hold a brief for
{v. phr.} To argue in support of; defend. - Usually used with a negative. * /I hold no brief for John, but I do not think he was responsible for the accident./ * /The ...
hold a candle to
also[hold a stick to] {v. phr.} To be fit to be compared with; be in the same class with. - A trite phrase used in negative, interrogative, and conditional sentences. * ...
hold all the trumps
{v. phr.} To have the best chance of winning; have all the advantages; have full control. * /Most of the team wants John for captain and he is the best player. He will he ...
hold back
{v.} 1. To stay back or away; show unwillingness. * /The visitor tried to gel the child to come to her, but he held back./ * /John held back from social activity because he ...
hold court
{v. phr.} 1. To hold a formal meeting of a royal court or a court of law. * /Judge Stephens allowed no foolishness when he held court./ 2. {informal} To act like a king ...
hold down
{v.} 1. To keep in obedience; keep control of; continue authority or rule over. * /Kings used to know very well how to hold down the people./ 2. {informal} To work ...
hold everything
See: HOLD IT.
hold fire
See: HOLD ONE'S FIRE.
hold forth
{v.} 1. To offer; propose. * /As a candidate, Jones held forth the promise of a bright future./ 2. To speak in public; preach. - Usually used with little respect. * ...
hold good
{v.} 1. To continue to be good; last. * /The coupon on the cereal box offered a free toy, but the offer held good only till the end of the year./ * /Attendance at the ...
hold it
or[hold everything] {v. phr.}, {informal} To stop something one is doing or getting ready to do. - Usually used as a command. * /The pilot was starting to take off, ...
hold off
{v.} 1a. To refuse to let (someone) become friendly. * /The president's high rank and chilly manner held people off./ Compare: KEEP AT A DISTANCE. 1b. To be rather ...
hold on
{v.} 1. To keep holding tightly; continue to hold strongly. * /As Ted was pulling on the rope, it began to slip and Earl cried, " Hold on, Ted!"/ Syn.: HANG ON. 2. To ...
hold on to
{v. phr.} 1a. or[hold to] To continue to hold or keep; hold tightly. * /When Jane played horse with her father, she held on to him tightly./ * /The teacher said ...
hold on to your hat
See: HANG ON TO YOUR HAT.
hold one's horses
{v. phr.}, {informal} To stop; wait; be patient. - Usually used as a command. May be considered rude. * /"Hold your horses!" Mr. Jones said to David when David wanted to ...
hold one's breath
{v. phr.} 1. To stop breathing for a moment when you are excited or nervous. * /The race was so close that everyone was holding his breath at the finish./ 2. To ...
hold one's end up
or[hold up one's end] or[keep one's end up] or[keep up one's end] {v. phr.}, {informal} To do your share of work; do your part. * /Mary washed the dishes so fast that Ann, ...
hold one's fire
or[hold fire] {v. phr.} To keep back arguments or facts; keep from telling something. * /Tow could have hurt Fred by telling what he knew, but he held his fire./ * /Mary ...
hold one's head up
{v. phr.} To show self-respect; not be ashamed; be proud. * /When Mr. Murray had paid off his debts, he felt that he could hold his head up again./
hold one's nose to the grindstone
See: KEEP ONE'S NOSE TO THE GRINDSTONE.
hold one's own
{v. phr.} To keep your position; avoid losing ground; keep your advantage, wealth, or condition without loss. * /Mr. Smith could not build up his business, but he held ...
hold one's peace
{v. phr.}, {formal} To be silent and not speak against something; be still; keep quiet. * /I did not agree with the teacher, but held my peace as he was rather angry./ ...
hold one's temper
or[keep one's temper] {v. phr.} To make yourself be quiet and peaceful; not become angry. * /The meeting will go smoothly if the president keeps his temper./ * /Dave ...
hold one's tongue
{v. phr.} To be silent; keep still; not talk. - May be considered rude. * /The teacher told Fred to hold his tongue./ * /If people would hold their tongues from unkind ...

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