Слова на букву in a-keep (459) Словарь американских идиом
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Слова на букву in a-keep (459)

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Indian summer
{n. phr.} A dry and warm period of time late in the fall, usually in October. * /After the cold and foggy weather, we had a brief Indian summer, during which the ...
industrial park
{n.} A complex of industrial buildings and/or businesses usually located far from the center of a city in a setting especially landscaped to make such buildings look ...
inside
See: STEP INSIDE.
inside and out
See: INS AND OUTS, INSIDE OUT(2).
inside of
{prep.} In; within; on or in an inside part of; not beyond; before the end of. * /There is a broom inside of the closet./ * /There is a label on the inside of the box./ ...
inside out
{adv.} 1. So that the inside is turned outside. * /Mother turns the stockings inside out when she washes them./ 2. or [inside and out] also[in and out] In every ...
inside track
{n. phr.} 1. The inside, shortest distance around a curved racetrack; the place that is closest to the inside fence. * /A big white horse had the inside track at the ...
insofar as
{conj.} To the extent that; to the point that; as much as. * /You will learn your lessons only insofar as you are willing to keep studying them./
insomuch as
See: INASMUCH AS.
instance
See: FOR EXAMPLE or FOR INSTANCE.
instead of
or[in place of] also {formal}[in lieu of] {prep.} In the place of; in substitution for; in preference to; rather than. * /I wore mittens instead of gloves./ * /The grown-ups had ...
insult
See: ADD INSULT TO INJURY.
intent
See: TO ALL INTENTS AND PURPOSES.
into a nose dive
See: oo INTO A TAIL SPIN or GO INTO A NOSE DIVE.
into a tail spin
See: GO INTO A TAIL SPIN.
into account
See: TAKE INTO ACCOUNT.
into commission
See: IN COMMISSION.
into effect
{adv. phr.} Into use or operation. * /The new rule was put into effect at once./ * /The judge ordered the old suspended penalty into effect./
into hot water
See: HOT WATER.
into line
{adv. phr.} 1. Into agreement. * /The department's spending was brought into line with the budget./ 2. Under control. * /Independent congressmen were brought into line by ...
into one's blood
See: IN ONE'S BLOOD.
into one's head
See: BEAT INTO ONE'S HEAD, TAKE INTO ONE'S HEAD.
into one's own
See: COME INTO ONE'S OWN.
into one's own hands
See: TAKE THE LAW INTO ONE'S OWN HANDS.
into one's shell
See: IN ONE'S SHELL.
into one's shoes
See: STEP INTO ONE'S SHOES.
into practice
See: IN PRACTICE.
into question
{adv. phr.} Into doubt or argument. - Usually used with "call", " bring" or "come". * /This soldier's courage has never been called into question./ * /If a boy steals, his ...
into the bargain
See: IN THE BARGAIN.
into the fire
See: OUT OP THE FRYING PAN INTO THE FIRE.
into the ground
See: RUN INTO THE GROUND.
into the hands of
See: PLAY INTO THE HANDS OF.
into thin air
{adv. phr.} Without anything left; completely. * /When Bob returned to the room, he was surprised to find that his books had vanished into thin air./ Compare: OUT OF ...
Irish
See: GET ONE'S DANDER UP or GET ONE'S IRISH UP.
iron horse
{n.}, {informal} A railroad locomotive; the engine of a railroad train. * /In its first days, the iron horse frightened many people as it roared across country scattering ...
iron in the fire
{n. phr.} Something you are doing; one of the projects with which a person is busy; job, * /John had a number of irons in the fire, and he managed to keep all of them ...
iron out
{v.}, {informal} To discuss and reach an agreement about (a difference); find a solution for (a problem); remove (a difficulty). * /The company and its ...
is
See: SUCH AS IT IS, THAT IS.
island
See: SAFETY ISLAND.
issue
See: AT ISSUE, TAKE ISSUE.
it figures
{informal sentence} It checks out; it makes sense; it adds up. * /It figures that Bob got the highest raise at our firm; he is the most productive salesman./
it is an ill wind that blows nobody good
No matter how bad a happening is, someone can usually gain something from it. - A proverb. * /When Fred got hurt in the game John got a chance to play. It's an ill wind ...
it never rains but it pours
One good thing or bad thing is often followed by others of the same kind. - A proverb, * /John got sick, then his brothers and sisters all got sick. It never rains ...
it's a cinch
{informal sentence} It is very easy. * /"What about the final exam?" Fred asked. "It was a cinch" Sam answered./ Compare: PIECE OF CAKE.
it's a deal
{informal sentence} Consider it done; OK; it is agreed. * /"How much for this used car?" Bill asked. "Two thousand," the man answered. "I'll give $1,500," Bill said. ...
it's been ---, it's been real
{informal} Shortened form for "it has been real nice (being with you)" - used colloquially between very close friends.
it's high time
{informal sentence} It is overdue. * /It is high time for John Browning to be promoted to full professor; he has written a great deal but his books went unnoticed./ ...
itching palm
{n.}, {slang} A wish for money; greed. * /He was born with an itching palm./ * /The bellboys in that hotel seem always to have itching palms./
item
See: COLLECTOR'S ITEM, CONSUMER ITEMS.
itself
See: END IN ITSELF.
Ivy League
{n.} A small group of the older and more famous eastern U.S. colleges and universities. * /Several Ivy League teams play each other regularly each year./ * /Harvard, ...
Jack
See: ALL WORK AND NO PLAY MAKES JACK A DULL BOY.
jack of all trades
{n.}, {informal} (Often followed by the words "master of none.") A person who is knowledgeable in many areas. Can be used as praise, or as a derogatory remark depending on the ...
Jack Robinson
See: BEFORE ONE CAN SAY JACK ROBINSON.
jack up
{v.} 1. To lift with a jack. * /The man jacked up his car to fit a flat tire./ 2. {informal} To make (a price) higher; raise. * /Just before Christmas, some stores jack up ...
jack-rabbit start
{n.}, {informal} A very sudden start from a still position; a very fast start from a stop. * /Bob made a jack-rabbit start when the traffic light turned green./ ...
jackpot
See: HIT THE JACKPOT.
jailbait
{n.}, {slang} A girl below the legal age of consent for sex; one who tempts you to intimacy which is punishable by imprisonment. * /Stay away from Arabella, she is ...
jailbird
{n.}, {informal} A convict; someone who is in jail or has been recently released from prison. * /Because Harry was a jailbird, it was understandably hard for him to ...
jake flake
{n.}, {slang} A boring person whose company is usually not wanted. * /Please don't invite Turner, he is a jake flake./
jar on
{v. phr.} To irritate. * /The constant construction noise was beginning to jar on the nerves of the members of the meeting./
jaw
See: GLASS JAW.
jaw drop
or[jaw drop a mile] {informal} Mouth fall wide open with surprise. - Used with a possessive. * /Tom's jaw dropped a mile when he won the prize./
jawbreaker
{n.} 1. A large piece of hard candy or bubblegum. * /Billy asked his mother for a quarter to buy some jawbreakers and a chocolate bar./ 2.[informal] A word or name ...
jaws tight
{adj.}, {slang}, {informal} Angry; uptight; tense. * /Why are you getting your jaws so tight?/
jazz up
{v.}, {slang} To brighten up; add more noise, movement, or color; make more lively or exciting. * /The party was very dull until Pete jazzed it up with his drums./
Jehu
See: DRIVE LIKE JEHU.
jerk
or[jerker] See: SODA JERK or SODA JERKER.
jerry-built
{adj.} 1. Built poorly or carelessly of cheap materials; easily broken. * /That jerry-built cabin will blow apart in a strong wind./ 2. Done without careful ...
Jesus boots
or[Jesus shoes] {n.}, {slang} Men's sandals, particularly as worn by hippies and very casually dressed people. * /I dig your Jesus boots, man, they look cool./
jig's up
See: GAME'S UP.
jim-dandy
{n.}, {slang} Something wonderful; something very good. * /Tommy's new boat is really a jim-dandy! I wish I had one like it./
jink
See: HIGH JINKS.
job
See: DO A JOB ON, FALL DOWN ON THE JOB, LIE DOWN ON THE JOB, ON THE JOB.
Joe Doakes
{n.} A name used informally for the average man. * /Let us say that Joe Doakes goes to the movies three times a year./ Compare: MAN IN THE STREET, SO-AND-SO.
John Doe
{n.} A name used for an unknown person, especially in police and law business. * /The alarm went out for a John Doe who stole the diamonds from the store./
John Hancock
or[John Henry] {n.}, {informal} Your signature; your name in writing. * /The man said, "Put your John Hancock on this paper."/ * /Joe felt proud when he put his John ...
John Q. Public
{n.} A name used informally for the average citizen. * /It is John Q. Public's duty to vote at each election./ Compare: JOE DOAKES.
Johnny-come-lately
{n.} Someone new in a place or group; newcomer; also: a new person who takes an active part in group affairs before tlie group has accepted him; upstart. * /Everybody was ...
Johnny-on-the-spot
{adj. phr.} At the right place when needed; present and ready to help; very prompt; on time. * /A good waterboy is always Johnny-on-the-spot./ * /The firemen were ...
join forces
or[join hands] {v. phr.} To get together for the same aim; group together for a purpose; unite. * /The students and the graduates joined forces to raise money when the ...
join hands
See: JOIN FORCES.
joint
See: CLIP JOINT, PUT ONE'S NOSE OUT OF JOINT.
joke
See: CRACK A JOKE.
joking apart
See: JOKING ASIDE.
joking aside
or[joking apart] {v. phr.}, {informal} No fooling; without exaggerating: seriously. * /Joking aside, although the conditions were not very comfortable, we had a ...
Jones
See: KEEP UP WITH THE JONESES.
jot down
{v. phr.} To quickly commit to writing; make a quick note of something. * /Let me jot down your address so that I can send you a postcard from Europe./
judgment seat
{n.} A place where you are judged; a place where justice and punishment are given out. * /Mrs. Smith is so bossy, she always acts as though she is in the judgment seat./
jug-eared
{adj.} With ears that stick out like the handles of a jug. * /Tommy was a redheaded, freckle-faced, jug-eared boy./
juice
See: STEW IN ONE'S OWN JUICE.
juice dealer
{n.}, {slang} An underworld money lender who charges exorbitant fees to his clientele and frequently collects payment by physical force. * /No matter how broke you are, ...
jump
See: GET THE JUMP ON or HAVE THE JUMP ON, GO JUMP IN THE LAKE, NOT KNOW WHICH WAY TO TURN or NOT KNOW WHICH WAY TO JUMP.
jump all over
See: JUMP ON.
jump at
{v.} To take or accept quickly and gladly. * /Johnny jumped at the invitation to go swimming with his brother./ Compare: TAKE UP(7).
jump bail
or[skip bail] {v. phr.}, {informal} To run away and fail to come to trial, and so to give up a certain amount of money already given to a court of law to hold with ...
jump ball
{n.} The starting of play in basketball by tossing the ball into the air between two opposing players, each of whom jumps and tries to hit the ball to a member of his own team. ...
jump down one's throat
{v. phr.} To suddenly become very angry at someone; scold severely or angrily. * /The teacher jumped down Billy's throat when Billy said he did not do his homework./
jump from the frying pan into the fire
See: OUT OP THE FRYING PAN INTO THE FIRE.
jump on
or[jump all over] or[land on] or[land all over] {v. phr.}, {informal} To scold; criticize; blame. * /Tom's boss jumped all over Tom because he made a careless mistake./ * ...
jump on the bandwagon
or[get on the bandwagon] {v. phr.}, {informal} To join a popular cause or movement. * /At the last possible moment, the senator jumped on the winning ...
jump out of one's skin
{v. phr.}, {informal} To be badly frightened; be very much surprised. * /The lightning struck so close to Bill that he almost jumped out of his skin./ Compare: HAIR STAND ...
jump pass
{n.} A pass (as in football or basketball) made by a player while jumping. * /The Bruins scored when the quarterback tossed a jump pass to the left end./
jump the gun
also[beat the gun] {v. phr.} 1. To start before the starter's gun in a race. * /The runners were called back because one of them jumped the gun./ 2. {informal} To start ...
jump the traces
See: KICK OVER THE TRACES.
jump the track
{v. phr.} 1. To go off rails; go or run the wrong way. * /The train jumped the track and there was a terrible accident./ * /The pulley of the clothesline jumped the track and ...
jump through a hoop
{v. phr.}, {informal} To do whatever you are told to do; obey any order. * /Bob would jump through a hoop for Mary./ Compare: TWIST AROUND ONE'S LITTLE FINGER, UNDER ...
jump to a conclusion
{v. phr.} To decide too quickly or without thinking or finding the facts. * /Jerry saw his dog limping on a bloody leg and jumped to the conclusion that it had ...
jumping-off place
{n. phr.} 1. A place so far away that it seems to be the end of the world. * /Columbus' sailors were afraid they would arrive at the jumping-off place if they sailed ...
junked up
{adj.} or {v. phr.}, {slang}, {drug culture} To be under the influence of drugs, especially heroine. * /You can't talk to Billy, he's all junked up./
just about
{adv.}, {informal} Nearly; almost; practically. * /Just about everyone in town came to hear the mayor speak./ * /The dress came down to just about the middle of her ...
just for the fun of it
{adv. phr.} Merely as a matter of amusement. * /"I'll bring a goat to class," Bob said to his classmates, "just for the fun of it; I want to see what kind ...
just for the hell of it
See: JUST FOR THE FUN OF IT.
just in case
{adv. phr.} For an emergency; in order to be protected. * /"Here are my house keys. Sue," Tom said. "I'll be back in two weeks, but you should have them, just in ...
just in time
See: IN TIME.
just now
{adv. phr.} 1. Just at this moment; at this time. * /Mr. Johnson isn't here just now. Will you phone back later? 2./ {informal} A very short time ago; only a moment ago; ...
just so(1)
{adj.} Exact; exactly right. * /Mrs. Robinson likes to keep her house just so, and she makes the children take off their shoes when they come in the house./
just so(2)
{conj.} Provided; if. * /Take as much food as you want, just so you don't waste any food./ Syn.: AS LONG AS(2).
just so(3)
{adv. phr.} With great care; very carefully. * /In order to raise healthy African violets you must treat them just so./
just the other way
or[the other way around] {adv. phr.} Just the opposite. * /One would have thought that Goliath would defeat David, but it was the other way around./
just the same
See: ALL THE SAME.
just what the doctor ordered
{n. phr.}, {informal} Exactly what is needed or wanted. * /"Ah! Just what the doctor ordered!" exclaimed Joe when Mary brought him a cold soda./
justice
See: DO JUSTICE TO.
kangaroo court
{n.} A self-appointed group that decides what to do to someone who is supposed to have done wrong. * /The Chicago mob held a kangaroo court and shot the gangster who ...
keel
See: ON AN EVEN KEEL.
keel over
{v.} 1. To turn upside down; tip over; overturn. - Usually refers to a boat. * /The strong wind made the sailboat keel over and the passengers fell into the water./ ...
keen about
or[on] {adj. phr.} Very enthusiastic about someone or something. * /It is well known that Queen Elizabeth is keen on horses./
keep house(1)
{v. phr.} To do the necessary things in a household; do the cooking and cleaning. * /Since their mother died, Mary and her brother keep house for their father./
keep (one) posted
{v. phr.} To receive current information; inform oneself. * /My associates phoned me every day and kept me posted on new developments in our business./
keep a civil tongue in one's head
{v. phr.} To be polite in speaking. * /He was very angry with his boss, but he kept a civil tongue in his head./ * /The bus driver began yelling at the woman and ...
keep a close check on
See: KEEP TAB(S) ON.
keep a stiff upper lip
{v. phr.} To be brave; face trouble bravely. * /He was very much worried about his sick daughter, but he kept a stiff upper lip./ * /Although he was having some ...
keep a straight face
See: STRAIGHT FACE, DEADPAN.
keep abreast (of) someone
or[something] {v. phr.} To be informed of the latest developments. * /It is difficult to keep abreast of all the various wars that are being waged on planet Earth./ Compare: ...
keep after
{v.}, {informal} To speak to (someone) about something again and again; remind over and over again. * /Some pupils will do sloppy work unless the teacher keeps after them to ...
keep an ear to the ground
See: EAR TO THE GROUND.
keep an eye on
or[keep one's eye on] or[have one's eye on] {v. phr.} 1. To watch carefully; not stop paying attention to. * /Keep an eye on the stove in case the coffee boils./ * /You ...
keep an eye open
or[keep an eye out for] See: KEEP AN EYE ON.
keep an eye out
See: EYE OUT.
keep at
{v.} To continue to do; go on with. * /Mary kept at her homework until she finished it./ Compare: KEEP ON(1), KEEP UP(1b).
keep away
{v. phr.} To remain at a distance from. * /Her mother advised Diane to keep away from men offering a ride./
keep back
{v. phr.} To refrain or be restrained from entering; remain back. * /The police had a hard time keeping back the crowd when the astronauts came to town after walking on the ...
keep body and soul together
{v. phr.} To keep alive; survive. * /John was unemployed most of the year and hardly made enough money to keep body and soul together./ Compare: KEEP THE WOLF FROM THE ...
keep books
{v. phr.} To keep records of money gained and spent; do the work of a bookkeeper. * /Miss Jones keeps the company's books./
keep company
{v. phr.} 1. To stay or go along with (someone) so that he will not be lonely to visit with (someone). * /John kept Andy company while his parents went to the movies./ * ...
keep cool
{v. phr.} Remain calm; remain unexcited. * /The main thing to remember in an emergency situation is to not lose one's head and keep cool./
keep down
{v.} Keep from progressing or growing; keep within limits; control. * /The children could not keep their voices down./ * /We hoe the garden to keep down the weeds./ * /You ...
keep from
{v.}, {informal} To hold yourself back from; stop or prevent yourself from (doing something). * /Can you keep from repeating gossip?/ * /Jill can't keep from talking ...
keep good time
See: KEEP TIME.
keep house(2)
also[play house] {v. phr.}, {informal} To live together without being married. * /Bob and Nancy keep house these days./
keep in mind
See: IN MIND.
keep in touch with
{v. phr.} To remain in communication with; maintain contact with. * /Don't forget to keep in touch, either by letter or phone, when you're in Europe!/
keep late hours
{v. phr.} To go to bed late; habitually stay up (and work) late. * /"If you always keep such late hours, your health might suffer," Tom's doctor said./
keep off
{v. phr.} To refrain from entering; stay away from. * /"Keep off the grass," the sign in the park indicated./
keep on
{v.} 1. To go ahead; not stop; continue. * /The neighbors asked them to stop making noise, but they kept right on./ * /Columbus kept on until he saw land./ - Often used ...
keep on the good side of
See: ON ONE'S GOOD SIDE.
keep one at a distance
or[keep one at arm's length] {v. phr.} To avoid (someone's) company; not become too friendly toward. * /Mr. Smith is kind to the workers in his store but after work he ...
keep one's balance
{v. phr.} To stay even-tempered; not become overexcited. * /Mike has the best personality to run our office; he always keeps his balance./ Contrast: LOSE ONE'S BALANCE. ...
keep one's chin up
{v. phr.} To be brave; be determined; face trouble with courage. * /He didn't think that he would ever get out of the jungle alive, but he kept his chin up./ Compare: ...
keep one's distance
{v. phr.} To be cool toward someone; avoid being friendly. * /Mary did not like her co-worker, Betty, and kept her distance from her./ Compare: KEEP ONE AT A DISTANCE. ...
keep one's end up
See: HOLD ONE'S END UP.
keep one's eye on the ball
{v. phr.} 1. To watch the ball at all times in a sport, usually in order to hit it or get it; not stop watching the ball. * /Keep your eye on the baseball or you won't ...
keep one's eyes open
See: EYES OPEN.
keep one's eyes peeled
or[keep one's eyes skinned] {v. phr.}, {informal} To watch carefully; be always looking. * /The bird-watcher kept his eyes peeled for bluebirds./ * /When the boys walked ...
keep one's feet
{v. phr.} To keep from falling or slipping down; keep your balance; remain standing. * /The boy stumbled on the stairs but was able to keep his feet./ Compare: REGAIN ONE'S ...
keep one's feet on the ground
See: FEET ON THE GROUND.
keep one's fingers crossed
See: CROSS ONE'S FINGERS(1b).
keep one's hand in
{v. phr.} To keep in practice; continue to take part. * /After he retired from teaching, Mr. Brown kept his hand in by giving a lecture once in a while./ * /Mr. ...
keep one's head
also[keep one's wits about one] {v. phr.} To stay calm when there is trouble or danger. * /When Tim heard the fire alarm he kept his head and looked for the nearest ...
keep one's head above water
{v. phr.} To remain solvent; manage to stay out of debt. * /Herb's income declined so drastically that he now has difficulty keeping his head above water./
keep one's mouth shut
{v. phr.}, {informal} To be or stay silent. - A rude expression when used as a command. * /When the crooks were captured by the police, their leader warned them to keep their ...
keep one's nose clean
{v. phr.}, {slang} To stay out of trouble; do only what you should do. * /The boss said Jim could have the job as long as he kept his nose clean and worked hard./ * ...
keep one's nose to the grindstone
or[have one's nose to the grindstone] or[hold one's nose to the grindstone] {v. phr.}, {informal} To work hard all the time; keep busy with boring or ...
keep one's own counsel
{v. phr.}, {formal} To keep your ideas and plans to yourself. * /John listened to what everyone had to say in the discussion, but he kept his own counsel./ * /Although everybody ...
keep one's shirt on
{v. phr.}, {slang} To calm down; keep from losing your temper or getting impatient or excited. * /Bob got very angry when John accidentally bumped into him, but John told ...
keep one's temper
See: HOLD ONE'S TEMPER.
keep one's wits about one
See: KEEP ONE'S HEAD.
keep one's word
{v. phr.} To do what one has promised; fulfill one's promise. * /Paul kept his word and paid me the $250 that he owed me right on time./
keep open house
{v. phr.} To offer hospitality and entertain those who come at any given time on a certain day or afternoon. * /Beth and Charlie have a cottage by the lake where ...
keep out (of)
{v. phr.} 1. To stay out; remain out of. * /The sign on the fence said, "Danger! Keep out!"/ 2. To stave off; not allow in. * /The border patrol near El Paso, Texas, ...
keep pace
{v. phr.} To go as fast; go at the same rate; not get behind. * /When they go for a walk, Johnny has to take long steps to keep pace with his father./ * /When Billy was ...
keep plugging along
{v. phr.}, {informal} To continue to work diligently and with great effort, often against hardship. * /Bob was not particularly talented but he kept plugging along year ...
keep step with
{v. phr.} To maintain the same degree of progress as someone else. * /The United States has no choice but to keep step with potential enemies in terms of modern defense ...
keep tab on
or[keep tabs on] {v. phr.}, {informal} 1. To keep a record of. * /The government tries to keep tabs on all the animals in the park./ 2. To keep a watch on; check. * /The house ...
keep the ball rolling
{v. phr.}, {informal} To keep up an activity or action; not allow something that is happening to slow or stop. * /Clyde kept the ball rolling at the party by dancing ...
keep the faith
{v. phr.} To not abandon hope; stay committed to the cause of democracy and racial equality. * /"Keep the faith, Baby," my neighbor said as he raised his fingers to show the ...
keep the home fires burning
{v. phr.} To keep things going as usual while someone is away; wait at home to welcome someone back. * /While John was in the army, Mary kept the home fires burning./ ...
keep the wolf (wolves) from the door
{v. phr.} To avoid hunger, poverty, and/or creditors. * /"I don't like my job," Mike complained, "but I must do something to keep the wolves from the door."/ Compare: KEEP ...
keep things humming
{v. phr.} To cause thing to perform smoothly and efficiently. * /Until Mr. Long joined our computer center, we had all sorts of problems, but he has corrected them and ...
keep time
{v. phr.} 1. To show the right time. * /My watch has not kept good time since I dropped it./ 2. To keep the beat; keep the same rhythm; keep in step. * /Many people are ...
keep to oneself
See: TO ONESELF(2).

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